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Creating_Making

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2014 Creating_Making Forum

Creating Making 2014 Program Download

Creating_Making schedule

 

The Creating_Making Forum, hosted by the Division of Architecture in the College of Architecture at The University of Oklahoma, promotes collaboration and critical inquiry, as well as curiosity about creating, about making, and the intersections of creating and making in all design-related disciplines. This Forum offers an opportunity for scholars, students, and professionals to analyze emerging landscapes of thought, materiality, politics, and pedagogy, through lectures, paper and visual presentations, discussions, field trips, and informal meetings. Held in conjunction with the Bruce Goff Chair of Creative Architecture Lecture Series and drawing inspiration from the experimental character of Bruce Goff’s work, the Creating_Making Forum renews our understanding of possibilities for creating sensory environments in the twenty-first century.

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2014 Creating_Making Forum Information

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AIA Learning Objectives

  • Do the Tools Matter? Technology in an Evolving Industry
  • APPROVED 1.5 HSW
  • Participants will be able to identify the concept of customized repetitive manufacturing, and how innovative technology can be used to integrate customized repetitive manufactured components in the building’s overall design and aesthetics.
  • Participants will be able to describe a computational design tool for mass-customization of bricks in order to create better performing structural assemblies.
  • Participants will be able to identify affordable ways for structural brick construction using computational tools.
  • Participants will be able to describe the process used and the development of the process tools for customized repetitive manufacturing of a building component.

 

  • Lessons From Home: Policies and Practices for a Rapidly Urbanizing World
  • APPROVED 1.5 LUs
  • Participants will recognize the primary differences between the architecture and social life of formal and informal settlements.
  • Participants will examine the social, cultural and economic characteristics of residents of informal settlements.
  • Participants will be able to compare the housing conditions of those living in informal settlements in 4 countries.
  • Participants will discuss future policies that enable residents of informal settlements to obtain develop the housing prototypes that meet their physical and financial needs.
  • Fabricating Political Capital: Material Expressions of Power
  • APPROVED 1.5 LUs
  • Participants will be able to distinguish some of the nuanced ways in which political power has been constituted in the environment historically as evidenced through form, materials, and details.
  • Participants will be able to analyze expressions of political power through comparisons to historical examples in terms of design characteristics, languages of style, and intended meaning.
  • Participants will be able to recognize when and how non-governmental entities utilize forms or tactics associated with political power historically and evaluate the outcome against the design intentions.
  • Participants will be able to interpret contemporary designs that express power—political or otherwise—in the context of historical examples and form well supported arguments as to why certain forms project power given their time and place. 

 

  • Working Within Others’ Walls
  • APPROVED FOR 1.5 HSW
  • Participants will be able to formulate an expansion plan and a sustainability plan for an urban building that promotes the transformation of a non-profit organization based on a case study of a similar, successful project.
  • Participants will be able to discuss the design of new buildings in a manner that they can be disassembled and reused, totally or partially, as part of the next generation of construction based on the topic of “designing for future adaptive re-use.”
  • Participants will be able to determine new options for designing alternative, affordable, public housing projects within existing areas based on the case study presented in this session.
  • Participants will be able to evaluate three very different ways of “working within others’ walls” that will be helpful for future adaptive re-use projects.

 

  • Defining the Dash: Design-Build Pedagogies
  • APPROVED 1.5 HSW
  • Participants will be able to identify several design-build pedagogies at various scales of space and materials.
  • Participants will be able to describe contrasting and complementing approaches to hands-on learning within design-build pedagogies.
  • Participants will be able to describe several pedagogical advantages and disadvantages of iterative design.
  • Participants will be able to demonstrate how several projects have integrated collaborative approaches to design-build pedagogies.

 

  • Mid-Century Modern and the Landscape: Symbiosis in America’s Heartland
  • APPROVED 1.5 HSW
  • Participants will be able to describe the historical significance of Post-War Modern architecture in America’s prairie regions.
  • Participants will be able to identify several architecturally relevant examples representative of this period.
  • Participants will be able to describe several arguments for preserving existing intact buildings representative of this period.
  • Participants will be able to identify how buildings representative of this period contribute to visually and culturally diverse built environments.

 

  • Sourcing Creativity: Authorial Anxiety in an Age of Collaboration
  • APPROVED 1.5 LUs
  • Participants will be able to differentiate between architectural criticism based in reader response and author intent in architectural publications.
  • Participants will be able to identify potential places of conflict within the complicated structure of design attribution and will be able to recognize authorial overreach.
  • Participants will be able to analyze the process by which a unified design emerges from a network of design authors, and will be able to implement strategies for authorial consistency among multiple collaborators in their own design practice.
  • Participants will be able to formulate arguments for and against the use of intellectual property rights in the design industry.

 

  • Toward a New Studio Environment
  • APPROVED 1.5 LUs
  • Participants will be able to identify environmental issues within existing architectural studios, which conflict with future architectural curriculums, by comparing and contrasting existing studio spaces with proposed spaces at new programs.
  • Participants will be able to identify the characteristics of interactive design studios, which establish more creative and social interactions among students, though the examination of existing studio and lecture spaces.
  • Participants will be able to implement unique spatial components which enhance architectural studio spaces, for advanced technology components within new architectural pedagogies, by clarifying programmatic needs of the new student.
  • Participants will be able to identify the components needed for effective design studio spaces which require multiple space uses for collaborative design through the evaluation of existing interdisciplinary programs.