Majors and Minors in Classics

Muse

A Muse

Homer


Homer

Sappho

Sappho

Sophocles

Sophocles

Euripides

Euripides

Plato

Plato

Cicero

Cicero

Caesar

Caesar

Vergil

Vergil

A degree in Classics will acquaint students with the major languages, the chief literary figures, and the cultures of ancient Greece and Rome.

In addition to their study of these ancient civilizations, Classics majors also learn about the important role that the Classical tradition has played in shaping the literature, arts and general culture of Western civilization. Through its focus on the classical world, the program gives particular attention to the skills necessary for success in the information age: oral and written communication, independent and critical thinking, and the management and evaluation of information.

Students also have the opportunity to participate in archaeological excavations at various sites in the Mediterranean region under the auspices of the Center for Classical Archaeology and Civilizations, which is housed in the Department of Classics and Letters. 

Recent graduates have pursued advanced degrees in Classics at the University of Iowa, the University of Virginia, the University of Missouri, the University of Buffalo, and Cambridge University. The Classics major also provides excellent preparation for law, medicine, and religious ministry. Our graduates have followed a staggering variety of career paths.


Majors in Classics

Classical Studies

The Classical Studies [degree checksheet] major is a traditional liberal arts major for undergraduates with an interest in ancient Greece and Rome. It is similar to our Letters program in its emphasis on history, literature, philosophy, language, and culture, but it focuses on Classical civilization. This option is ideal for students who have an interest in ancient Greece and Rome but do not wish to pursue the training in the Greek and Latin languages necessary for admission to graduate school in Classics. With the exception of the required courses in either Latin or Greek, the course materials are in English.

Alumni of this program have gone on to careers in banking, business, education, law, and politics.

The concentration in Classical Studies requires 36 hours of courses in Classical Culture (27 hours of which must be in courses numbered 3000 or above, including the capstone), 6 hours of supporting courses in Greek or Latin languages at the intermediate level or above. Up to 9 hours may be in related subjects, including Greek, Latin, or Letters courses, with prior approval of the Department of Classics and Letters.

Classical Languages

In the major in Classical Languages [degree checksheet], students pursue a more traditional curriculum that emphasizes the study of the Greek and Latin languages.

This option is ideal for preparing students to enter upon advanced study in graduate school or seminary, but it will also benefit those desiring solid training in the liberal arts for a variety of careers, such as law, medicine, business, education and government. Students who select this option study both Greek and Latin literature in the original languages and in translation, and they also take courses on all aspects of the ancient world.

To fulfill the requirements of a major concentration in Classical languages, students must earn 56 hours of credit in Latin, Greek and Classical Culture courses including at least 18 hours numbered 3000 and above. Courses taken in related subjects must have prior approval of the Classics and Letters Department in order to be counted as major work. Advanced Standing, Advanced Placement, CLEP, or similarly recognized credit for work prior to matriculating to the University may be counted toward the fulfillment of these requirements, up to a maximum of 16 credit hours.

Latin

The third degree option, Classics: Latin [degree checksheet], is intended for those who wish to teach Latin at the high school level. To fulfill the requirements of a major concentration in Latin students must earn 46 credit hours in courses in Latin and Classical Culture including at least 24 hours numbered 3000 and above. Courses taken in related subjects must have prior approval of the Classics and Letters Department in order to be counted as major work. Advanced Standing, Advanced Placement, CLEP, or similarly recognized credit for work prior to matriculating to the University may be counted toward the fulfillment of these requirements, up to a maximum of 16 credit hours.


Minors

Students wishing to minor in Classical Culture [checksheet] will be required to earn 15 credit hours of work in classical culture courses. Twelve hours must be earned in classical culture courses numbered 3000 or above.

Three hours of credit in ancient history or ancient philosophy may be substituted for work in classical culture with the permission of the chair of the department. Classical Culture 1412 and 2412 may not be counted towards the minor.

Students wishing to minor in Greek [checksheet] will be required to earn 15 hours in Greek courses numbered 2000 and above. Six hours of work in classical culture courses numbered 3000 and above may be substituted for six hours of work in Greek. A minimum of nine hours of the Greek minor must be at 3000 level or above.

Students wishing to minor in Latin [checksheet] will be required to earn 15 hours in Latin courses numbered 2000 and above. Six hours of work in classical culture courses numbered 3000 and above may be substituted for six hours of work in Latin. A minimum of nine hours of the Latin minor must be at 3000 level or above.

 


If any of these programs interests you, please contact one of our academic advisors to learn more about degree programs in Classics.

Peggy Chambers
325-4931

Angie Gauthier
325-5933

John Hansen
325-8156

Samuel J. Huskey
325-0490
Cheryl Walker-Esbaugh
325-3478