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The doctoral degree is awarded for excellence in research scholarship. It signifies the attainment of independently acquired and comprehensive learning attesting to general professional competence. The doctoral degree requires at least 90 post-baccalaureate hours, including both formal coursework and hours of research. All coursework applied to the doctoral degree must carry graduate credit. But students may petition to take one, 3 credit, course at the 4000 level.

All PhD students are expected to choose two research areas, one primary and one secondary, in which to focus their coursework and writing. Students will design these areas of study in close consultation with the chair of their committee. These areas of study may be selected from well-established fields of national literature and/or historical periods (e.g., British, American, Native American, post-colonial Anglophone, medieval, early modern, Eighteenth, Nineteenth or Twentieth century), Composition, Rhetoric, and Literacy, theoretical approaches (feminism/gender studies, critical race/ethnicity studies, Marxism, poststructuralism), media studies (film, graphic novel), more recent areas of scholarly interest (transnational literatures, new kinds of interdisciplinary studies, digital humanities). The committee must consist of a committee chair, an outside member, and three other members of the graduate faculty.

Faculty are committed to preparing graduate students through preparation in coursework, mentoring, and professional development. Students have published their work in prominent journals and presented at national and local conferences. Teaching assistantships are competitive with peer institutions, and financial assistance for dissertation completion and conference travel is available through the department, the College of Arts and Sciences, and the Graduate College. The department has been successful in helping students find tenure-track positions and other employment in the field. See our faculty by their areas of specialization here.

English 2123.002: Creative Writing

Professor Susan Kates

TR 12:00-1:15

This course is meant to spark your literary interests, talents, and inclinations, so that you can walk away with a clearer image of who you are – or rather, who you might be – as a writer. This is a course for those who might have never written creatively before, as well as those who are fairly decided on their preferred forms of writing. We will read and analyze short stories, poems, and creative non-fiction, analyzing the stylistic choices of a wide range of writers. You will critique the work of your classmates and help one another to revise a portfolio of writing that will be produced over the course of the semester.

 

ENGL 2123.004: Creative Writing

Rilla Askew

MWF 11:30-12:20

(Prerequisite: ENGL 1113)

Introduction to imaginative writing, especially short stories and poems; analysis of literary models and emphasis on student writing.  Coursework will include assigned readings from the text and written responses to the readings as well as written and oral analysis of fellow writers’ work presented in class.

This course introduces writers to the skills needed to create imaginative writing. You’ll try your hand at short stories, poems, and creative nonfiction, with the goals of stretching yourself as a writer, finding your strengths and areas that need improvement, and becoming adept at the elements of craft introduced in the course. You’ll also develop analytical strengths as you practice the craft of “reading like a writer” and offer constructive, detailed critique of fellow students’ work.

Through careful reading of the assigned texts; analysis of signature elements in fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction; peer review and writing workshop, you’ll strengthen your own creative work as you learn how to critique, and be critiqued, constructively

 

ENGL 2273.00 Literary and Cultural Analysis: Love and Loss

Daniel Ransom

MW 1:30-2:45

Love is one of the great motive forces in human life, so powerful that loss of it can lead to a psychological or spiritual demise or even a corporeal one. Conversely, the afterlife of love-lost can lead to a broader experience of one’s humanity, to a greater wisdom or fuller consciousness. Writers have explored these themes across the centuries, sometimes as a way to cope with loss, sometimes as an effort to understand what it means to be human, always striving to find new ways to articulate ideas and feelings and thus come to a clearer perception. In this course you will study examples of these literary efforts and, through discussion of and writing about techniques and conventions, come to perceptions of your own. Texts to be read will span the genres of poetry, drama, and fiction and include works by Virgil, Chaucer (in translation), Shakespeare, and others.

 

ENGL 2283.001 Critical Methods: Postcolonial Caribbean Theory

Rita Keresztesi

TR 10:30-11:45

This course focuses on postcolonial Caribbean cultural theory. We discuss how European colonization of the islands and the African slave trade have impacted their peoples and cultures. Through a variety of writings styles, such as travelogue, historical essay, fiction and poetry, that cover such topics as emancipation, independence, and decolonial struggles, we revisit some of the canonical authors of English and American literature from a postcolonial perspective. We will enrich our reading experiences through film and music. We will read literature by V.S. Naipaul, Earl Lovelace, C.L.R. James, George Lamming, Michelle Cliff, Jamaica Kincaid, or Christian Campbell and listen to reggae and dub music by Bob Marley, Peter Tosh, Lady Saw, and Mutabaruka, and calypso by The Mighty Sparrow, David Rudder, Machel Montano, and others. Grades are based on class participation, an in-class presentation, and several reading responses.

 

ENGL 2883.001: American Literature from the Civil War to the Present

Henry McDonald

TR 1:30-2:45

This course will survey late 19th and 20th century American literature, including the works of African-American, Jewish-American, Southern, and Women writers, with a view to what it means to be “other” in America, drawing not just on WEB Dubois’s notion of double-consciousness, but on the thought of recent French philosophers Michel Foucault and Emmanuel Levinas, all of whom made resistance to the normalizing forces of modern social and political life a central focus of their work. Among the authors whose work we will read are Mark Twain, Sarah Orne Jewett, Susan Glaspell, Henry James, Ambrose Bierce, Kate Chopin, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, WEB Dubois, Charles Chesnutt, Ralph Ellison, Jack London, Stephen Crane, William Faulkner, Flannery O’Connor, Willa Cather, Bernard Malamud, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Philip Roth, James Baldwin, Alice Walker, Toni Morrison, Louise Erdrich, Leslie Marmon Silko, and Maxine Hong Kingston.

 

English 3103.003: Advanced Composition Writing About Place

TR 1:30-2:45

Professor Susan Kates 

In this course you will find ways to think and write about your experiences of being in all sorts of places in the world. Have you ever thought about why you feel comfortable in one environment and not another? How do the rhythms of place shape who you are and how you feel in certain locations? This is not strictly a travel writing course or a nature-writing course, though we will certainly examine examples of both travel writing and nature writing. Specifically, we will practice the following: We will learn how to write about those places important to us by closely examining and utilizing such elements as history, geography, language, and culture (through personal experience and research) in order not just to write more effectively about the places in our lives but also to better understand ourselves and our place in the wider global world. And, through close reading of the assigned texts, we will consider the various techniques used by established writers to convey a sense of place, as well as the roles place plays in their writing, ultimately adapting and utilizing these strategies in our own work.

 

ENGL 3113.001 Nature/Environment/Science Writing

Dr. Sandra Tarabochia

TR 12:00-1:15

“The universe beckons to us with many voices and gestures. We look and listen, mull over what we have taken in, and then respond with creations of our own” (“Ordinary Wealth” Orion Magazine, 2013). In this course we will use reading, writing and observation as tools for listening and responding to the universe as it beckons. We will take an ecological approach to writing and cast ecology in a writerly light as we explore the moral, ethical and physical ground where the human and nonhuman meet. We will analyze how humans have used writing to map, catalogue, codify, economize and master the natural world and study how writers have captured and forged timeless, yet evolving connections between nature and humanity. We will use writing ourselves to ponder how and why our minds and spirits are pulled toward wildness and consider how connections between body and earth might become sources of knowledge from which to imagine and enact social change. Students will design course projects that align with their disciplinary interests and writing goals and, toward that end, to practice and experiment with strategies from nature, environmental and science writing, as well as autobiographical writing and creative nonfiction. This course is ideal for students in any discipline looking for dedicated time to improve their writing in a supportive workshop setting.

 

ENGL 3203.001 Rhetoric and Sexuality

Dr. Sandra Tarabochia

TR 9:00-10:15

This course examines rhetoric and sexuality as vital dimensions of critical literacy—ways of reading, writing, thinking, and knowing required for active citizenship in a democratic society. Students will explore intersections of rhetoric, literacy, and sexuality as they “function socially, culturally, politically, and personally.” We will learn “to work knowledgeably, engagingly, and critically” with the discourses of sexuality that shape our individual and collective lives (Alexander, Literacy, Sexuality, Pedagogy). Course projects invite students to analyze the rhetoric of sexuality, craft sexual literacy narratives, and develop extended public arguments about issues that spark their passions. The course culminates in a public showcase of student work and students will learn to design digital research posters for this purpose. Student writing is the heart of this course, and class time is devoted to composing, revising, sharing, and experimenting with writing.

 

ENGL 3253.001 Special Topics in American Indian Literature: Indians, Oil, and Water

Kimberly Wieser

TR 12:00-1:15

Adams 112

Indians, Oil, and Water traces the complex relationship between tribal nations and people and non-Indians involving natural resources, in particular, oil and water, and how that relationship has been depicted in American Indian and Indigenous oral traditions, fiction, and film and Alaskan Native poetry. Some attention will also be paid to the legal structures that guide natural resource extraction on Indian land and to activism regarding natural resource extraction, particularly in regard to the recent intertribal, international movement Idle No More, along with site-specific activism in the past two decades including the 2016-17 occupation at Standing Rock. The goal of this course is to gain exposure to various American Indian ethics and beliefs about natural resources and natural resource development as expressed in literature, film, and other media and be able to discuss and write about these in an informed, intelligent, and cordial manner. Some of the books and films we will study in class includeLinda Hogan’s Solar Storms and Mean Spirit, Joseph Erb’s The Beginning They Told and We Prayed in Water, and Sacred Water: Standing Rock Part I—RISE. We will do both in class and out of class short, informal writing assignments in multiple genres, create a multigenre research paper, and take a final exam.  

 

ENGL 3363.001 Films and Context: African Cinema

Rita Keresztesi

TR 12:00-1:15

This class offers a unique perspective on postcolonial Sub-Saharan African filmmaking. The beginning of African cinema production coincided with and chronicled the political, economic, social, cultural and psychological aspects of decolonization. African filmmakers made the medium their platform to publicly debate the tasks and challenges for newly independent nations. The career of Ousmane Sembene (Senegal), often called the “Father of African Cinema,” spanned forty-some years from the early 1960s till his death in 2007. We will view and discuss several of his and his contemporaries’ films, as well as recent movies from both West and East Africa. African cinema follows in the tradition of “orature,” and filmmakers are the modern descendants of traditional storytellers or “griots.” We will sample some of the canonical and recent films from Senegal, Mali, Burkina Faso, Nigeria, and Kenya. We conclude the course with the study of Nollywood cinema (Nigeria) that inspired filmmaking in Ghana (Ghallywood), Tanzania (Swahiliwood or Bongo Cinema) and elsewhere. We will focus on both the form and the content of the films by examining the ways that African filmmakers project local, national, and regional issues onto global screens. We discuss the different aesthetic forms and genres chosen by the filmmakers (i.e. social realism, avant-gardism, magical realism, melodrama, etc.) and look at the types of social critiques the films engage in as they tackle topics such as gender, migration, corruption, occultism, human rights, Westernization, or neocolonialism, among others. Students will have access to the films through online streaming services and we will also read critical texts on how to “watch” films from Africa.

 

ENGL 3483.900 Native American Writers: Joy Harjo, Poet Laureate of the United States

Kimberly Wieser

TR 4:30-5:45

Burton 0210

This course focuses on the work of Muscogee Nation citizen, Tulsa Native, and US poet laureate Joy Harjo. We will read two books of interviews and conversations with Harjo--Soul Talk, Soul Language: Conversations with Joy Harjo and The Spiral of Memory: Interviews with Joy Harjo; Harjo's memoir--Crazy Brave; Harjo's books of poetry--She Had Some Horses; Secrets from the Center of the World; In Mad Love and War; The Woman Who Fell from the Sky; A Map to the Next World; ; How We Became Human; Conflict Resolution for Holy Beings; and An American Sunrise; and her early adolescent/kid-lit book--For a Girl Becoming. Students will work together as a creative team to produce a website with links to news articles, blogs, information on Harjo's primary works, her music, a bibliography of scholarship and interviews, and student designed study guides on her works. All assignments will be related directly to this group-authored product with individually-written components.

 

ENGL 3513: Medieval English literature

Joyce Coleman

MWF 1:30-2:20 pm

Headington Residential College D0127

This course will explore English literature at its source, beginning with the vigorous language and amazingly spare, imagistic verse of the Anglo-Saxons; through the knights and ladies, outlaws and elf-queens, lost kingdoms and topsy-turvy tournaments that populate the popular romance; and on through the period of Chaucer and his contemporaries. We will wind up in the late fifteenth century, where medieval drama was anticipating Marlowe and Sir Thomas Malory turned the death of King Arthur into a lament for the passing of the Middle Ages itself. Throughout, we will look at history, art, and the manuscripts that preserved medieval culture for us, to give depth and texture to our understanding of this long and fascinating era.

Major requirements this course fulfills: Group I (LCS checksheet) & pre-1700 (LCS checksheet)

 

English 4133: History of the English Language

Daniel Ransom

MWF 12:30-1:20

This course traces the development of the English language, from its Indo-European roots to its Germanic ancestry, and then through the major phases of its transformations: Old English (Anglo-Saxon), Middle English (the language of Chaucer), Early Modern English (the language of Shakespeare), and contemporary English, in some of its various forms. We will track changes in pronunciation and spelling, changes in vocabulary, and shifts of meaning for certain words. We will also follow the adjustments in the habits of sentence formation. Along the way we will see how various idiosyncrasies of modern English came to exist. Why do we say life with an [f] but alive with a [v]? Why the different pronunciations of l-i-v-e in “I live for live music”? Why don’t we say thou anymore? And what is ye in “Ye Olde Coffee Shoppe”? Why is there a b in debt and a gh in night? (Not the same reason in each case.) Many such questions will be addressed in this class.

 

ENGL 4273.001 Women Writers: Poetry and Politics of the Victorian Poetess

Justin Sider

MW 3:00-4:15

This class explores one of the most complex cultural figures of the nineteenth century: the Poetess. Women poets in the Victorian period were expected to fulfill multiple, contradictory expectations—to be at once artist and aesthetic object, at once mother, maiden, and muse. Their poems were often taken as pure expressions of the soul, yet they were in fact carefully calibrated performances. In this sense, the Poetess is not so much a person as a set of gendered conventions and expectations, a role that women poets played when they wrote and published poetry. The term sounds patronizing to us today, but we can still see its legacy in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, in the sophisticated work of poets like Sylvia Plath or even pop singers like Lana Del Rey. This semester, we will focus on the careers of three major Victorian women writers—Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Christina Rossetti, and Augusta Webster—and consider the ways that they negotiate questions of gender and genre across the Victorian period. We’ll supplement our study of these authors with a range of other writing, from Romantic poetry to writing by Anglophone Indian and Indigenous poets to contemporary pop music, as well as criticism and theory on poetics and gender.

 

ENGL 4303-002/5303-002: Postcolonial Literature and Theory: Humans and Animals in a Postcolonial Frame

Amit R. Baishya

M 1.30-4.10

Postcolonial literature and theory traditionally privileges questions of “human suffering” (Kwame Anthony Appiah). If animals are in the horizon at all, they usually appear as specters that haunt constructions of the human. While we will acknowledge the genealogy of “human skins, animal masks” (Neel Ahuja) in postcolonial literature and theory over the longue durée, our joint explorations will also orient us in different directions. Some of the fundamental questions driving this class include:

 • Whether actual animals that appear in postcolonial literature/theory can be read and encountered as material and tangible presences instead of being reduced to metaphorical substitutes for divergent states of de/humanization?

 • If we encounter animals as material presences in such imaginative works, do they provide alternative ways of envisaging located inter/trans/multispecies relationships? • What are the differences between anthropocentrism, anthropomorphism and zoomorphism? While we will critique anthropocentrism relentlessly, we will consider whether there more affirmative ways of rereading forms of anthropomorphism and zoomorphism?

• What are the ethical and political stakes of considerations of postcolonial bio/necro/zoopolitics?

• How are such critical interrogations of postcolonial animality related to the construction of that slippery and elusive term: the “human”?

To explore these questions, this class will be divided into four units: “The Human Animal,” “The Humanized Animal?: Dogs” “Megafauna,” “Small Animals.” We will read some well-known Europhone literary and cinematic texts along with texts in English translation. Primary texts will be supplemented with relevant theoretical material.

Primary Texts: 1) Frantz Fanon—The Wretched of the Earth (trans. Richard Philcox, Grove Press) 2) Sembene Ousmane—Xala (Chicago Review Press) 3) Indra Sinha—Animal’s People (Simon and Schuster) 4) Malik Sajad—Munnu: A Boy from Kashmir (Fourth Estate) 5) JM Coetzee—Disgrace (Penguin) 6) Patrick Nganang—Dog Days: An Animal Chronicle (University of Virginia Press) 7) Amitav Ghosh—The Hungry Tide (Mariner Books) 8) Zakes Mda—The Whale Caller (Picador) 9) Ibrahim Al-Koni—Gold Dust (The American University in Cairo Press) 10) Mahasweta Devi—Imaginary Maps (Routledge) 11) Henrietta Rose-Innes—Nineveh (The Unnamed Press) 12) Keri Hulme—Stonefish (HUIA Publishers) 13) Films: Battle of Algiers, Xala.

Major requirements this course fulfills: Multicultural course

 

ENGL 4733.001: American Realism and Naturalism

Henry McDonald

TR 3:00-4:15

This course will survey works in 19th and 20th century American Realism, Naturalism, and Modernism, with attention to the relations between modern subjectivity and state power – to the ways in which gender, class, and race have been influenced by the normalizing processes of society and government. Among the authors we will read are Sarah Orne Jewett, Mary Wilkins Freeman, Willa Cather, Mark Twain, Henry James, Kate Chopin, Booker T. Washington, Charles Chestnutt, Pauline Hopkins, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Katherine Anne Porter, W.E.B. Du Bois, Jack London, James Weldon Johnson, Nella Larsen, Stephen Crane, Willa Cather, F. Scott Fitzgerald, William Faulkner. Included are Chopin’s The Awakening, Crane’s Maggie, A Girl of the Streets and The Monster, James’s The Turn of the Screw, Johnson’s The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man, Twain’s Puddn’head Wilson, Porter’s Pale Horse, Pale Rider, and Faulkner’s As I Lay Dying.

 

ENGL 4853 Capstone:  The Bible As / And Literature

David Anderson

TR 4:30-5:45

It is sometimes said that the Bible is not a book but a library.  It is made up of dozens of books written over centuries, in different styles and even different languages.  At the same time, the Bible has always been experienced by Jewish and Christian readers as telling a single story (though they obviously differ as to what that story is).  In both its unity and multiplicity scripture has inspired and haunted the minds of poets, dramatists and novelists from late antiquity to the present.

A “Bible as literature” approach looks at the various literary genres that make up the Hebrew and Christian scriptures—creation myths, poetry, history, letters, wisdom literature, prophecy.  A “Bible and literature” approach considers the literary, philosophical and ethical influence the Bible has had on later writing, whether devout or secular.  In this class we will attempt to do both.  In other words, we’re aiming for an appreciation of how the Psalms or the Gospel of John work on their own terms as lyrics or narratives, and also how later authors in the English tradition have read and made use of them.

At its heart this class is about intertextuality:  the relationship between two different pieces of writing.  When an author is making use of a specific Biblical text (which may itself be doing the same thing with other Biblical texts) a conversation opens up between them, which can either clarify or complicate our understanding of each.  These conversations will be the fuel for our conversations over the course of the semester.  Along the way, we will read a number of Biblical texts and also literary works by such writers as Shakespeare, Dickens, Austen and Hopkins.  Students will write an initial short paper, and then work on a longer research paper, which will include several smaller assignments. 

 

ENGL 4953/5953 Special Topics in Creative Writing: Historical Fiction.

Rilla Askew

M 3:00-5:40

(Prerequisites for 4953: ENGL 2123 and ENGL 3123 or ENGL 3133 or ENGL 3223.)

Practice in advanced creative writing with emphasis on style and strategies for creating work in specific genres. Can be taken for up to 9 hours with change of content.

This is an in-depth writing course focused on researching and writing historical fiction. Through reading published historical novels as well as historical sources, we will explore aspects of writing historical fiction, including methods of research, historical accuracy vs. literary license, point of view, voice, historical detail, and other key elements in creating historical fiction. Students will create two chapters of an historical novel or two historical short stories. Coursework includes reading and analysis of historical fiction, in-class presentations, detailed written responses to fellow writers’ work as well as verbal analysis and feedback in workshop.

The first part of the semester will be devoted to the study of published historical novels and selected historical sources that inform them. Everyone will give one oral presentation and we’ll also make a library research trip and a field trip to historical sites related to the course material. From midsemester on, students will concentrate on developing their own historical fiction.

 

ENGL 4970/5970: Special Topics in World Literature Today: Mohsin Hamid and Pakistani Anglophone Fiction

Dr. Amit Baishya, Department of English

Wednesdays 4:00-5:30pm

Monnet 105

2020 Puterbaugh fellow Mohsin Hamid (www.mohsinhamid.com) has been hailed as one of the most original voices in South Asian Anglophone fiction. This course though will not focus on his position in the trans-regional construct of South Asia, but rather on his location within the national domain of Pakistani Anglophone fiction. We will read Hamid’s four novels (Moth Smoke, Exit West, The Reluctant Fundamentalist and How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia) alongside major works of Pakistani Anglophone writing such as Salman Rushdie’s Shame, Mohammad Hanif’s Red Birds, Kamila Shamsie’s Kartography and Nadeem Aslam’s The Blind Man’s Garden. Over the course of eight weeks, we will read Hamid’s novels in tandem with those of his predecessors (Rushdie) and contemporaries (Shamsie, Hanif, Aslam) as we try to understand his position in the burgeoning oeuvre of Pakistani Anglophone fiction. While this course will be an introduction to his work, we will also discuss topics like nationalism, nation building, post-coloniality, diaspora and globalization, and the impact of the “war on terror” in Pakistan and Afghanistan.

Mohsin Hamid will be visiting campus to take part in the Puterbaugh Festival (April 6–8). Students will be expected to attend most of the events of the festival, at which they will be given an assignment to interview Mr. Hamid or one of the visiting scholars one-on-one about their work. Other writing assignments include a few written responses to the novels discussed in class and a 10- to 12-page research paper at the end of the semester. Eight meetings will be held during the semester on Wednesday from 4.00-5.30. The dates when we will meet are: 01/22, 02/05, 02/19, 03/04, 03/25, 04/01, 04/15 and 04/29.

Major requirements this course fulfills: Multicultural course

 

ENGL 5133: Teaching Technical Writing

William Kurlinkus

TH 1:30-4:10

Science writing and journalism, lab reports, corporate summaries, grant writing, editing, ethnographic observation, workflow studies, user-centered design, participatory design, conflict mediation, infographic production, website redesign—technical communication as a field encompasses numerous streams which all coalesce around translating technical information for a non-technical audience. Technical communicators, thus, usually have to be highly adaptable, ready to solve any (often vague) problem a client might have in communicating to their audience of customers, employees, funding agencies, bosses, et al. Technical writing, then, is writing in technical fields, but it is so much more.

In this course graduate students will:

1.    Prepare to teach OU’s specific course on technical communication to a particularly STEM-minded group of undergraduate students (often highly appreciative to get writing training but sometimes unclear on why they need user-centered and humanistic training as well). Instructors have the opportunity to teach this course in person, online, and over the summers and are encouraged to customize the curriculum to their interests.

2.    Learn about and train to enter the highly-employable field of technical communication as academics who can perform research in technical communication,

and

3.    Learn about and train to enter the field of technical communication as workers who could theoretically get jobs as technical communicators.

Among other texts readings will include:

·      Angela Haas and Michelle F. Eble. Key Theoretical Frameworks: Teaching Technical Communication in the Twenty-First Century.

·      Meredith A. Johnson, W. Michele Simmons, Patricia Sullivan. Lean Technical Communication

·      Liza Potts and Michael Salvo. Rhetoric and Experience Architecture.

 

ENGL 5303/4303: Postcolonial Literature and Theory: Humans and Animals in a Postcolonial Frame

Amit R. Baishya

M 1.30-4.10

Postcolonial literature and theory traditionally privileges questions of “human suffering” (Kwame Anthony Appiah). If animals are in the horizon at all, they usually appear as specters that haunt constructions of the human. While we will acknowledge the genealogy of “human skins, animal masks” (Neel Ahuja) in postcolonial literature and theory over the longue durée, our joint explorations will also orient us in different directions. Some of the fundamental questions driving this class include:

 • Whether actual animals that appear in postcolonial literature/theory can be read and encountered as material and tangible presences instead of being reduced to metaphorical substitutes for divergent states of de/humanization?

 • If we encounter animals as material presences in such imaginative works, do they provide alternative ways of envisaging located inter/trans/multispecies relationships? • What are the differences between anthropocentrism, anthropomorphism and zoomorphism? While we will critique anthropocentrism relentlessly, we will consider whether there more affirmative ways of rereading forms of anthropomorphism and zoomorphism?

• What are the ethical and political stakes of considerations of postcolonial bio/necro/zoopolitics?

• How are such critical interrogations of postcolonial animality related to the construction of that slippery and elusive term: the “human”?

To explore these questions, this class will be divided into four units: “The Human Animal,” “The Humanized Animal?: Dogs” “Megafauna,” “Small Animals.” We will read some well-known Europhone literary and cinematic texts along with texts in English translation. Primary texts will be supplemented with relevant theoretical material.

Primary Texts: 1) Frantz Fanon—The Wretched of the Earth (trans. Richard Philcox, Grove Press) 2) Sembene Ousmane—Xala (Chicago Review Press) 3) Indra Sinha—Animal’s People (Simon and Schuster) 4) Malik Sajad—Munnu: A Boy from Kashmir (Fourth Estate) 5) JM Coetzee—Disgrace (Penguin) 6) Patrick Nganang—Dog Days: An Animal Chronicle (University of Virginia Press) 7) Amitav Ghosh—The Hungry Tide (Mariner Books) 8) Zakes Mda—The Whale Caller (Picador) 9) Ibrahim Al-Koni—Gold Dust (The American University in Cairo Press) 10) Mahasweta Devi—Imaginary Maps (Routledge) 11) Henrietta Rose-Innes—Nineveh (The Unnamed Press) 12) Keri Hulme—Stonefish (HUIA Publishers) 13) Films: Battle of Algiers, Xala.

 

ENGL 5313-900 Literary Criticism

Professor Jim Zeigler

Tuesdays, 4-7, Cate Two TBD

This section of 5313 will be a seminar in theory. To contend against the tired and wrong caricatures of theory as antithetical to responsible historiography, this course will use a cultural rhetoric studies approach to investigate the relationship between our difficult, abstract readings and the circumstances in which they were composed and circulated. At the same time, in willful contradiction to this respect for historical context, this seminar will play anachronistically (and pedagogically) with conversations imagined between texts written in impressively different situations. And we’ll endeavor to be practical about theory by putting it to work in our discussions and writing.

The primary purpose of this course is to prepare you to understand, describe, assess, and employ various approaches to textual studies that have influenced and defined the fields of Literary & Cultural Studies. We’ll also consider the complementary pertinence of these methods for the discipline of Rhetoric & Writing Studies. Along our way, course requirements will enable you to practice research methods and genres of writing that are essential to creating knowledge professionally.

As it offers you preparation for further work in LCS and RWS, this seminar will provide you with an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of theory in the humanities. Our course will be organized into units on keywords for scholarship in the humanities, e.g. aesthetics, ideology, history, sexuality, narrative, etc. Such topics will allow us to navigate a sufficient number of tendencies in theory for you to become conversant in the signature concerns (i.e. the foundational questions) that have initiated several schools of thought, including: the New Criticism, Marxism, Foucaultian discourse analysis, psychoanalysis, deconstruction, the New Historicism, feminism, queer theory, and postcolonial criticism.

Prior to the start of classes in January, each participant in this seminar will be required to identify a “proof text” from their area of specialization. No duplicates will be permitted, so email me (jzeigler@ou.edu) your preference with a brief rationale (100-200 words) at your earliest convenience after December 1.

 

ENGL 5953/4953 Special Topics in Creative Writing: Historical Fiction.

Rilla Askew

M 3:00-5:40

(Prerequisites for 4953: ENGL 2123 and ENGL 3123 or ENGL 3133 or ENGL 3223.)

Practice in advanced creative writing with emphasis on style and strategies for creating work in specific genres. Can be taken for up to 9 hours with change of content.

This is an in-depth writing course focused on researching and writing historical fiction. Through reading published historical novels as well as historical sources, we will explore aspects of writing historical fiction, including methods of research, historical accuracy vs. literary license, point of view, voice, historical detail, and other key elements in creating historical fiction. Students will create two chapters of an historical novel or two historical short stories. Coursework includes reading and analysis of historical fiction, in-class presentations, detailed written responses to fellow writers’ work as well as verbal analysis and feedback in workshop.

The first part of the semester will be devoted to the study of published historical novels and selected historical sources that inform them. Everyone will give one oral presentation and we’ll also make a library research trip and a field trip to historical sites related to the course material. From midsemester on, students will concentrate on developing their own historical fiction.

 

ENGL 5970/4970: Special Topics in World Literature Today: Mohsin Hamid and Pakistani Anglophone Fiction

Dr. Amit Baishya, Department of English

Wednesday 4:00-5:30pm

Monnet 105

2020 Puterbaugh fellow Mohsin Hamid (www.mohsinhamid.com) has been hailed as one of the most original voices in South Asian Anglophone fiction. This course though will not focus on his position in the trans-regional construct of South Asia, but rather on his location within the national domain of Pakistani Anglophone fiction. We will read Hamid’s four novels (Moth Smoke, Exit West, The Reluctant Fundamentalist and How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia) alongside major works of Pakistani Anglophone writing such as Salman Rushdie’s Shame, Mohammad Hanif’s Red Birds, Kamila Shamsie’s Kartography and Nadeem Aslam’s The Blind Man’s Garden. Over the course of eight weeks, we will read Hamid’s novels in tandem with those of his predecessors (Rushdie) and contemporaries (Shamsie, Hanif, Aslam) as we try to understand his position in the burgeoning oeuvre of Pakistani Anglophone fiction. While this course will be an introduction to his work, we will also discuss topics like nationalism, nation building, post-coloniality, diaspora and globalization, and the impact of the “war on terror” in Pakistan and Afghanistan.

Mohsin Hamid will be visiting campus to take part in the Puterbaugh Festival (April 6–8). Students will be expected to attend most of the events of the festival, at which they will be given an assignment to interview Mr. Hamid or one of the visiting scholars one-on-one about their work. Other writing assignments include a few written responses to the novels discussed in class and a 10- to 12-page research paper at the end of the semester. Eight meetings will be held during the semester on Wednesday from 4.00-5.30. The dates when we will meet are: 01/22, 02/05, 02/19, 03/04, 03/25, 04/01, 04/15 and 04/29.

 i. Admissions Requirements:

 a. Prospective graduate students must submit an application for admission and official transcripts to the Office of Admissions.
b. A $50 non-refundable application processing fee is required of all applicants for admission to the University of Oklahoma.
c. The English Department deadline for applying to the Graduate Program for the Fall term is January 5th. New students are not accepted into the graduate programs during the Spring or Summer terms.
d. To be considered for admission into the Ph.D. program, we require the following: a Grade Point Average of 3.5 or better on a 4.00 scale in graduate work already completed; and an M.A. in English or in a closely related field. A student with a slightly lower G.P.A. may be considered if the application is otherwise very strong. Candidates are admitted on a competitive basis.
e. A Financial Aid Services packet, and information about eligibility for financial aid, can be obtained from the Office of Financial Aid at (405) 325-4521.

ii. Application Requirements (to be submitted with online application):
a. Three (3) Letters of Reference: On your online application, you will be asked to provide emails for three references who will be contacted by the University with a request for a letter of recommendation. Your recommenders should comment specifically upon (1) your qualifications as a graduate student (literary judgment, writing ability, originality, diligence) and, if you are applying for Graduate Teaching Assistantship (GTA), (2) your qualifications as a prospective teacher (ability to organize, enthusiasm, responsibility, objectivity). If possible, referees should use the online reference system, but if they prefer, they may send hardcopy letters directly to the Office of Graduate Admissions (731 Elm Avenue, Room 318 Norman, OK 73019).
b. Official Transcripts: These should be sent directly to the Office of Graduate Admissions (731 Elm Avenue, Room 318 Norman, OK 73019). Unofficial transcripts may also be uploaded to your online application.
c. Statement of Goals in Graduate education, including reasons for the choice of Field of Specialization (250-500 words). Upload to your online application.
d. Critical Writing Sample: It should be no more than 25 pages, appropriate to program and area. (If applying to the Creative Writing program, you must submit a creative writing sample as well.) Uploaded to your online application.

i. Teaching Assistantships:
a. Teaching Assistantships with stipends of $14,608 are available on a competitive basis for up to five years at the Ph.D. level. Prospective students interested in teaching assistantship support should indicate that on the application. Two weeks before the beginning of the first semester, all students who receive teaching appointments will also participate in a workshop to help them prepare for their courses, covering topics such as reading assignments, writing assignments, paper grading, and classroom strategy. Students awarded graduate teaching assistantship (GTA) positions will typically teach one to two composition courses each semester under the supervision of the First Year Composition Office (FYC). After a student has completed coursework and passed the Ph.D. General Exams, dissertation research can be supported with a $1000 increase in the assistantship stipend for one year.

ii. Dissertation Fellowships:
a. Ph.D. students working on their dissertations are eligible to apply for a one-year dissertation fellowship, which will provide them financial support without any teaching duties. Students applying will need to demonstrate that substantial work on the dissertation is already completed, and that they have a clear plan for a writing schedule for the rest of the chapters. Students awarded fellowships will be expected not to take on any additional work responsibilities so that they can concentrate on research and writing.

iii. Teaching Release Opportunities:
a. Ph.D. students writing dissertations can apply for a one-course reduction in their teaching load for one semester, which is designed to allow them to concentrate more fully on their writing. The course reduction most often coincides with the period immediately before a student's dissertation defense, but the Graduate Committee will consider an alternate arrangement if applicants have a sound rationale for proposing it, such as a plan for completing archival research, etc. Students should apply for course release one or two semesters before the time they wish to take it. The Graduate Committee will evaluate applications with an eye toward students' degree of progress on the dissertation and the viability of their plan for a schedule of writing chapters.

iv. Post-Doctoral Appointments:

a. Students who have completed and defended their dissertation and are entering the job market may apply for a one-year post-doctoral appointment.

v. Rader Fellowship or Sutton Fellowship:

a. To be eligible for these fellowships, students accepted into the graduate program in English must be admissible to the Graduate College in full standing. There is no additional application process to be eligible for this award; all entering M.A. and Ph.D. students are automatically considered.

b. The two-year fellowship for Ph.D. candidates include:

1. Teaching or research assistantship:

of $18,000 for Ph.D. recipients per academic year, full tuition waiver (in-state and out-of-state), up to six hours of coursework for fall and spring semesters, basic health insurance subsidy, and travel funds for research or conferences.

2. Reduced teaching load:

an 8-course reduction for Ph.D. students over the duration of the fellowship.

vi. Rudolph C. Bambas Scholarship:

This is a $2000 scholarship awarded to a graduate student planning to specialize in Medieval or Early Modern Studies (MEMS).

vi. Other Opportunities for Financial Support: 
In addition to teaching assistantships, fellowships, and special stipends, there are other sources of financial support in the English Department associated with specialized professional training.

- Two Research Assistantships are available for working with the Director of First-Year composition, who administers a large university-wide Freshman Composition Program. This program also offers a summer workshop with a stipend to prepare Teaching Assistants for their first year of instruction.

- The Sutton Endowed Chair in English provides a Research Assistantship in Literary Theory and Cultural Studies.

- World Literature Today, the prominent University of Oklahoma journal which administers the biannual Neustadt International Prize for Literature, offers two renewable one-year Assistantships for teaching and research related to the journal's mission.

A. Initial advisement should occur just prior to the beginning of the fall and spring semesters. In your admission letter you are informed of the name of the assigned faculty member from the Graduate Committee who will be your adviser for the first semester or year. As soon as possible, students should seek an advisor from among the faculty in their area of study. Until the student has found a permanent adviser, he or she should seek advisement from the assigned adviser and the Director of Graduate Studies.

B. During the first several weeks of the first semester in the program, new graduate students will meet collectively with the faculty and advanced students for an Orientation session and Q&A.

C. After the student has chosen a faculty member to serve as adviser, the adviser will thereafter help the student construct a coherent plan of study according to the regulations of the Graduate College and the structure of the Ph.D. program.

D. A plan of study will be prepared by the student and the Adviser, and approved by the Director of Graduate Studies, before enrollment for the second semester.

i. There are two course requirements for all students in the LCS concentration; the rest of your courses are electives. Therefore, to create a coherent program of study, students should meet regularly with the Chair of their advisory committee. Your electives should be selected in close consultation with your Chair. The Graduate Liaison is also available for all advising and answering questions before and after you select a Chair.
ii. A doctoral student must declare a primary and a secondary area chosen from the specialties available among the faculty. With the approval of your advisory committee, a student may choose Composition, Rhetoric, and Literacy (C/R/L) as a secondary area. A student's advisory committee may also allow a student to develop a related secondary area in a discipline other than English (such as history, philosophy, art history, music history, etc.), with appropriate graduate level coursework in another department. Your advisory committee will be constituted by four members from within the department (including your Chair) and one member from outside the department.
iii. Required Courses:
a. One course (3 hours) in Literary Criticism and Theory:
This course must be at the 5000 or 6000 level, and it must be a course different from the one taken for the M.A. If a Ph.D. student has not taken the equivalent of our Literary Criticism (ENGL 5313) course at the M.A. level, then that course should be used to fulfill this requirement. No directed readings are allowed to fulfill this criterion.
b. One course (3 hours) in Composition, Rhetoric, and Literacy:
This course can be ENGL 5113 (Teaching College Composition and Literature) if not used for the M.A. program.

iv. Elective Courses:

Six courses (18 hours) in the Concentration at the 5000 or 6000 level.

If you and the Chair of your committee decide there are good reasons for taking a 4000 level course within the English department, a graduate course outside the department, or a directed reading within or outside the department, you may petition the Graduate Committee to take such classes. All petitions must be accompanied by a letter or email of support from the Chair of your committee. If a student wishes to develop a secondary area in a discipline other than English (e.g., history), then the advisory committee may require him or her to take two 5000 level courses (6 hours), as well as additional graduate courses, outside of the department. (NB: only three (3) directed readings in total within the English department count towards a Ph.D., unless the student wishes to petition to the Graduate Committee to take more than this number of directed readings.)
v. In the semester before General Exams:

All students must fill out an Advisory Conference Report and file it with the Graduate College. Please consult the Graduate College Bulletin for more information about filing the ACR.

vi. Total Credit Hours

a. Required and Elective Courses: 24 hours
b. Credit for Directed Readings for General Examination: 6 hours
c. Total credit for Ph.D. in LCS: maximum of 90 hours beyond the B.A.

i. A doctoral student in CRL must declare a primary area and a secondary area of interest. Your advisory committee will be constituted of four members from within the department (including your Chair) and one member from outside the department.
ii. Required Courses:
a. One Research Methods course in Composition/Rhetoric/Literacy (3 hours)
b. One 6000 level Research Seminar in CRL (3 hours)
c. Three other courses in CRL: must include two 5000 level courses in History of Composition or in Rhetorical Theory. These three courses cannot be CRL courses taken for the M.A. and must be other than the required methods and research seminars (9 hours).
d. Two courses in secondary area (must be 5000 or 6000 level; no directed readings can fulfill these courses) (6 hours).
iii. Elective Courses:
a. One elective course (3 hours):
1. This course may be in CRL, Literary and Cultural Studies (LCS), or in disciplines outside English. They must be directly relevant to the student's preparation for doctoral research and must be approved by the Chair of your committee.
2. If you and the Chair of your committee decide there are good reasons for taking a 4000 level course within the English department, a graduate course outside the department, or a directed reading within or outside the department, you may petition the Graduate Committee to take such classes. All petitions must be accompanied by a letter or email of support from the Chair of your committee. (NB: only three directed readings in total within the English department count towards a Ph.D., unless, as mentioned above, the student wishes to petition to the Graduate Committee to take more than this number of directed readings.)
iv. In the semester before General Exams, all students must fill out an Advisory Conference Report and file it with the Graduate College. Please consult the Graduate College Bulletin for more information about filing the ACR. (A link to the Bulletin is provided at the end of this handbook.)
v. Total Credit Hours

a. Required and Elective Classes: 24 hours
b. Credit for Directed Readings for General Examination: 3 hours
c. Total credit for Ph.D. in CRL: maximum of 90 hours beyond the B.A.

The Ph.D. degree requires 57 hours beyond the 33 hours of the M.A., or 90 hours beyond the B.A. For the Ph.D. degree, a student may transfer up to six (6) credit hours of coursework done at other institutions; the transfer must be approved by his or her Advisory Committee as well as the Director of Graduate Studies. In addition, the Director of Graduate Studies may request transcripts, syllabi, and/or other course materials before approving these transfers.

A. The General Examination is the culmination of the student's coursework and his or her general preparation for doctoral work, before admission to doctoral candidacy. The examination should therefore test:
i. the overall knowledge of his or her chosen Primary and Secondary Fields which the student has acquired through coursework and independent preparation;
ii. his or her skills as a researcher, scholar, and critic in Literary and Cultural Studies or Composition/Rhetoric/Literacy.
B. The student's overall knowledge of his or her chosen Primary and Secondary Fields should be tested for its historical, generic, thematic, and critical depth and breadth.
C. The General Examination should be designed, administered, and evaluated by the student's committee. The fifth committee member (the outside member) may or may not be involved, along with the first four members, in setting and reading the written component; however, all five members must be present for the oral component. The General Examination will have a written component and an oral component. The Examination should preferably be taken in the semester immediately after the one in which coursework is completed, and no later than the third semester after completion of coursework. The written and oral components must be completed in the same semester. For more information on general examinations and deadlines, please consult the Graduate College Bulletin on the Graduate College’s website.
D. Students must file their Advisory Conference Report (ACR) with the Graduate College in the semester before they sit for the General Exams; they must also file the General Exam Application for the Doctoral Dissertation at least ten days before the written portion of the exams. The forms and deadlines can be found on the Graduate College’s website.
E. Written Component:
i. The written component will have two parts:

a. Part One, based on reading list of at least 50 items in the Primary Area;

b. Part Two, based on reading list of at least 30 items in the Secondary Area;

c. Both parts may also call for at least 25 items in criticism and theory.
ii. Doctoral candidates draft three (3) exam questions for the Primary Area and two (2) questions for the Secondary Area and submit them to their Committee. These questions should exhaust the materials on the reading lists, but they need not necessarily "cover" the whole list. Students will still be responsible for texts not discussed in the written exams during their orals. Students should consult her/his committee for their expectations and requirements for what reading lists and exam questions should look like, how they should be formatted, and how long exam responses should be.
iii. When the Committee approves the final version of the questions, the exam must be taken no more than 30 days later. The Committee will choose one question from each set of exam questions (from Primary and Secondary Areas) for the exam. The two parts of the written component will be presented to the student at 8am on a workday morning and the written answers to their questions shall be returned to the Graduate Office at or before 5pm on a workday four consecutive days following the day the exam was received (for a total of 5 consecutive days).

Ph.D. General Exam Schedule

Receive exam at 8:00 AM on:

Turn in exam by 5:00 PM on:

Monday

Friday

Thursday

Monday

Friday

Tuesday

F. Oral Component
i. The oral component should be about 2 hours long and should focus on the reading lists for the Primary and Secondary Fields. The oral component will provide an opportunity for both the student and the Committee to review, analyze, contextualize, and supplement the written component. Students should expect to be questioned on items from their reading lists not alluded to in the written component of the exam. Ability to demonstrate to the Committee familiarity and comprehension of the works on the reading lists is expected for the successful completion of the oral component. For more information on the oral component, including on the timeline of when it must be completed after taking the exam, please consult the Graduate College Bulletin.
ii. While a student is preparing for the General Examination, he or she must register for Directed Readings credit with the Chair of his or her committee (a maximum 6 credit hours is allowed for this purpose).

iii. The General Examination should be graded Fail, Pass, or Pass with Distinction. Only two attempts will be allowed, with a maximum interval of two semesters between them.

A. Preferably in the semester immediately after that in which the General Examination has been passed (and no more than two semesters after), the student should constitute a Doctoral Dissertation Committee. In most cases, the Dissertation Committee will be the same as the Advisory Committee; if the Committee is reconstituted, it must have the same structure as the Advisory Committee (i.e., there must still be five members, one of which must come from outside of the department), and the change must be approved by the Graduate College.

B. Dissertation Proposal: After passing the General Examination, a student must present a dissertation proposal in writing to his or her Dissertation Committee. The Dissertation Proposal should contain:

i. a substantive, cogent overview of the proposed topic and research;

ii. a clear chapter outline, with chapter titles and summaries;

iii. a thoroughly researched comprehensive bibliography on the topic.

C. The student must meet formally with the entire Dissertation Committee and obtain its approval of the proposal. If a student fails to present and receive approval for a Dissertation Proposal within two semesters after passing the General Examination, he or she may be placed on academic probation.

D. Starting the semester after successfully completing the General Examination, a student may register for Dissertation Research credit hours with the chair of his or her Dissertation Committee.

E. Credit Hours for Dissertation:

i. The student must enroll in a minimum of 2 credit hours (5 if receiving tuition waivers for a qualifying GA position) of Dissertation Research with their Dissertation Chair each semester until successful defense of the Dissertation. Enrollment during the Summer term is not required unless the student is actively working on the dissertation during the summer, or plans to hold their defense during the summer.

ii. The total number of Dissertation Research hours to be completed will be the amount required to reach 90 total credit hours after the BA, once all coursework is completed. (Example: An LCS student who enters the doctoral program with a 30-credit hour MA will complete 21 hours of required courses, 3 of electives, and 3 of Directed Reading, for a total of 57 hours of coursework. This student would need 33 total hours of Dissertation Research to complete the degree.)

iii. As long as enrollment minimums are met, Dissertation Research hours may be distributed among the semesters that the student is writing the dissertation at their discretion, up to 12 hours per semester. Most students choose to divide the hours evenly, according to the semester they intend to defend, to avoid large spikes in credit hours (and fees).

A. Each Ph.D. student is required to have a one-year teaching experience as part of the doctoral degree. Each academic year, the Graduate Committee will determine the specific ways in which particular students will be able to fulfill the teaching requirement, depending on the Department's resources and needs. This teaching experience may include teaching as a graduate teaching assistant (GTA) or as an adjunct, as well as working as a grader in the Department, or as a tutor in the Writing Center. Since this teaching does not carry credit hours, we will not "transfer" teaching experience from other institutions for this requirement. Typically, however, most Ph.D. students will teach two (2) sections of composition courses under the First Year Composition (FYC) program each semester.

B. All Ph.D. students therefore must take the Composition, Rhetoric, and Literacy (CRL) teaching course (ENGL 5113) for a credit of three (3) hours, and they must acquire teaching experience, as determined by the Graduate Committee, for at least one academic year (the credit for the CRL teaching course will be counted in the 57 hours for the Ph.D.).

NOTE: If a Ph.D. student has received an M.A. from our Department, and has been a teaching assistant while doing that degree, he or she need not repeat the teaching course, and they may use the earlier teaching experience to fulfill the Ph.D. teaching requirement.

A. The purpose of the language requirement is to enable students to enter an international community of scholars and to work with primary texts and scholarship across national and linguistic boundaries. The department therefore strongly encourages students to exceed the minimum level of proficiency required by the department.
B. In addition, different areas of concentration may require proficiency in more than one language. Therefore, students in both the M.A. and Ph.D. programs must consult with the Chair or provisional Chair of their committee by the second semester of their course work to decide if proficiency beyond the department’s minimum is required.
C. Native speakers of a language other than English or students with a B.A., M.A., or Ph.D. in a language other than English meet the minimum language requirement by default. However, such students should nonetheless consult with the Chair of their committee to decide what is necessary for their areas of concentration.
D. Students should seek to establish minimum proficiency as early in their program as they can. Minimum proficiency is defined in this manner:
i. One year in a language besides English with a grade of “B” or better (6- 10 credits);

ii. Passing grade on a translation exam as administered by Modern Languages, Literature, and Linguistics, Classics, or Anthropology

iii. One class in a graduate-level reading class (3 credits).
E. The department accepts course work from outside OU. Students must provide official transcripts or appropriate documentation. Translation exams must be taken at OU.
F. All students must provide proof of proficiency to the Graduate Director. Ideally, students should provide proof in the second semester of study. At the latest, Ph.D. students must do so when filling out the Advisory Conference Report prior to General Exams.

A. Each graduate student will be evaluated formally and collectively at the end of each academic year during a meeting of the faculty. The annual evaluation of each current graduate student will be an occasion for a careful (re)assessment of his or her scholastic progress, accomplishments, and prospects of continuation in the program. Students are evaluated upon their timely progress in the program and the quality of their work.

B. If a student's annual evaluation indicates that he or she is not making satisfactory progress in the program, the Graduate Committee will review the case and make an appropriate recommendation, such as further advisement, probation, etc.

C. Early on in the spring semester, students will submit to their Adviser the filled out Progress Report, sent through email by Sara Day (Graduate Assistant), with the required information for that academic year. The Adviser will submit a written evaluation for the student's report based on a review of the student's grades and performance in courses. During the Spring semester, in the Graduate Progress Report meeting of the full graduate faculty, each student’s performance is discussed and the faculty will deem the student’s progress acceptable or unacceptable. If a student receives two consecutive unacceptable progress report evaluations, the student’s continuation in the program becomes tenuous.

Please consult the Graduate College Bulletin for further info for doctoral students.