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About AME

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About AME

The School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering at the University of Oklahoma is one of seven schools within the Gallogly College of Engineering. This school has a rich history at the university and has produced many outstanding alumni. Additionally, we are very proud to say that both Aerospace Engineering and Mechanical Engineering undergraduate programs are accredited by Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET.

The School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering (AME) prepares students at all levels to solve engineering problems that are seen on a daily basis. Additionally, the school grooms students to solve the problems that the future holds. Through project-based education, working in teams of fellow students and the 28 full-time faculty of the school, students gain an unique educational experience in AME.


It is my pleasure to welcome you to the School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering (AME) at the University of Oklahoma (OU). AME continues to grow with the recruitment of world-class researchers and educators and attracts an ever-increasing number of new outstanding students.

We continue in the pursuit of excellence in learning, discovery and engagement. AME is well-known for providing an exceptional educational experience through innovative classroom teaching, hands-on projects, student competitive teams and industry supported design projects. We provide experiential learning opportunities that encompass the development of technical skills and competencies needed for future engineers to be effective in the workplace. We have strong partnership and support from industry collaborators to provide excellence in education through design projects, internships and co-op programs for students.

I am proud of our vibrant, active and engaged graduate student community. Our graduate programs attract talented local, national and international students, who have successful careers in research, development, academia and industry. Both Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering programs offer a five-year accelerated BS-MS program, along with traditional masters and doctoral degrees.

Research is a major component of AME’s activities.  AME’s faculty members are engaged in cutting-edge and high-impact research in aerospace and mechanical engineering. Our school has core strengths in many research topics, such as advanced materials, energy, combustion and heat transfer, design and manufacturing, modeling and simulation of complex flows, robotics, engineering education, unmanned vehicles, and bioengineering.

AME excels in providing a collegial and inclusive environment for faculty, staff and students that serves as a positive atmosphere for achievement (research and teaching). Our faculty and students continue to be recognized nationally and internationally. Enjoy these success stories and AME news you’ll find within our site. Our newsletter contains highlights, faculty, student and alumni spotlights, and our latest events.

As the director of AME, it is a privilege for me to work with the distinguished faculty members, staff, students, industry partners, alumni and Board of Advisors. Together, we creatively address issues and look for innovative approaches to meet the needs of all of our constituency groups to move AME forward. If you have any comments or suggestions, please do not hesitate to contact me. 

I look forward to working with you!

Sincerely,

Zahed Siddique

Director and Professor

School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering

The history of the School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering began in 1905 when the University of Oklahoma established the School of Applied Science consisting of Mechanical Engineering, Civil Engineering and Electrical Engineering. In 1908, James Houston Felgar became the Director of the Department of Mechanical Engineering, a position which he filled until 1925. In 1909, the College of Engineering was established and James Felgar served as the Dean of the College of Engineering from 1909 to 1937. In 2015, the College of Engineering was renamed the Gallogly College of Engineering (GCoE).

An Aeronautical Engineering option was added to the Mechanical Engineering program in 1929, which spurred the construction of the Wind Tunnel in 1936. During this timeframe, the Mechanical Engineering program was first accredited on October 1, 1936. These important milestones in the development of the program took place under the tenure of William Henry Carson. He served as Director of the Department of Mechanical Engineering from 1927 to 1942. Like Dean Felgar, he also served as Dean of the College of Engineering during this time.

In 1947, the Department of Aeronautical Engineering was established within the School of Mechanical Engineering. The School of Aeronautical Engineering was established as separate from the School of Mechanical Engineering in 1954. However, this name did not last long; the school was named the School of Aeronautical and Space Engineering in 1959 in order to keep up with the national trends. In 1963, the School of Aeronautical and Space Engineering and the School of Mechanical Engineering merged to become the School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering (AME).

Today, AME is one of seven schools within GCoE at the University of Oklahoma. Located in historic Felgar Hall, AME's vision is to be recognized as the premier learning community of faculty, staff and students that upholds collegiality and synergistic collaboration in the pursuit of academic excellence. We strive to be a community that values both individual and collective achievements. In keeping with this vision, AME offers students a diverse engineering education that emphasizes rigorous engineering curricula coupled with learning through doing. Students at all levels - undergraduate and graduate - have opportunities to participate in a number of learning experiences.

The mission of the School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering (AME) is to provide the best possible educational experience for our students through excellence in teaching, research and creative activity, and service to society, nationally and internationally. 

Program Educational Objectives are broad statements that describe what graduates are expected to attain within a few years of graduation.

a. Our graduates will have successful professional careers in industry, government, academia or non-profit organizations. 

b. Our graduates will be successful in solving the engineering problems associated with the lifecycle of complex systems.

c. Our graduates will continue to learn and advance their careers through activities such as participation in professional organizations, attainment of professional certification and post-graduate study. 

Student Outcomes are statements that describe what students are expected to know and be able to do by the time of graduation.  These relate to the skills, knowledge and behaviors that students acquire as they progress through the program.

a. an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering

b. an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data

c. an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability

d. an ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams

e. an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems

f. an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility

g. an ability to communicate effectively

h. the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context

i. a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning

j. a knowledge of contemporary issues

k. an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for aerospace engineering practice

l. in-depth knowledge of the major aeronautical topics and some knowledge of astronautical topics

m. competence in the integration of aerospace science and engineering topics in aerospace systems design

The mission of the School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering (AME) is to provide the best possible educational experience for our students through excellence in teaching, research and creative activity, and service to the state and society, nationally and internationally.

Program Educational Objectives are broad statements that describe what graduates are expected to attain within a few years of graduation.

a. Our graduates will have successful professional careers in industry, government, academia or non-profit organizations.

b. Our graduates will be successful in solving the engineering problems associated with the lifecycle of complex systems.

c. Our graduates will continue to learn and advance their careers through activities such as participation in professional organizations, attainment of professional certification and post-graduate study.

Student Outcomes are statements that describe what students are expected to know and be able to do by the time of graduation. These relate to the skills, knowledge and behaviors that students acquire as they progress through the program.

a. an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering

b. an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data

c. an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability

d. an ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams

e. an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems

f. an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility

g. an ability to communicate effectively

h. the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context

i. a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning

j. a knowledge of contemporary issues

k. an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for mechanical engineering practice

l. a knowledge of both thermal and mechanical systems areas