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“To provide the best possible educational experience for our students.”

Faculty Learning Communities

Faculty Learning Communities with building and people symbols

Fall 2014

Below are the learning communities for Fall 2014.  Please come back this page for more updates.

Participants will read What the Best College Teachers Do by Ken Bain (2004). Participants will examine the successful strategies for enhancing student learning through a better understanding of the learning process. Weekly meetings will discuss the concepts in the book, reflect on how they can be integrated into our teaching, and build a community of learners dedicated to excellence in teaching. Topics will include How we Learn, Prepare to Teach, Expect of their Students, Conduct Class, Treat Their Students, Evaluate their Students and Themselves, and What we can learn.

Eventbrite - What the Best College Teachers Do (FLC)

Our Faculty Learning Community will read and discuss "Flow" over the course of 6 weekly meetings.  We will discuss the book and share ideas about how "flow" might be achieved in a classroom activity or an assignment. This book presents fascinating research on the state of "flow," in which people are thoroughly engaged in an absorbing activity that brings them deep feelings of satisfaction—and, ultimately, happiness. Our best learning experiences are characterized by the state of flow, and hence we have the opportunity to enrich the lives of our students by creating such happiness-inducing experiences for them. Reading this book will give you a new perspective on the buzz of positive energy you witness when students are deeply engaged in some task you have given them. It might just help you design such tasks more effectively. We hope for an interdisciplinary and diverse group.

OU offers a unique setup where faculty can reallocate office hours to host an "Action Center," also known as a homework party or study session. Their setup is based on research showing increases in student success (retention and graduation rates) using trained peer tutors, faculty interaction, and collaborative learning techniques.  Our learning community invites faculty and instructors with past or current involvement in UC Action Centers, those with an interest in hosting one in the future, or those with an interest in student learning in general.  We will discuss research papers that inform the UC Action philosophy, talk about activities and techniques to promote active learning, and will hear best practices from UC Action-experienced faculty.

Eventbrite - Action Faculty - Learning Outside Of Class (FLC)

This faculty learning community will teach instructors to organize, write, shoot and edit basic videos to use in their teaching. Participants will walk through best practice pre-production, production and post-production techniques, culminating with the creation of a video product(s). The goal of this FLC is to create a course overview and introduction. Instructors will direclty address their audience using basic graphics and cutaway elements.

Final video projects could target the following:

  • A well developed but concise course overview (2 to 6 minutes),
  • A preferred lecture module, broken into three (6 minute max) video segments,
  • Choose your own adventure (we are willing to accommodate other concepts).

Eventbrite - Video at Your Fingertips - Creating a course introduction video (FLC)

"As scientists, we would never think of writing a grant proposal without a thorough knowledge of the relevant literature, nor would we go into the laboratory to actually do an experiment without knowing about the most current methodologies being employed in the field. Yet, all too often, when we go into the classroom to teach, we assume that nothing more than our expert knowledge of the disciplines and our accumulated experiences as students and teachers are required to be a competent teacher” (Michael, 2006).

The above-mentioned concern couples with increasing expectations for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education in many institutions. This faculty learning community (FLC) will bridge learning theories to college teaching in (STEM). By giving a coherent picture of what takes place in the learning process and what contexts STEM faculty are facing, the FLC will:

  • provide a handy introduction to the “why and how” of engaging students in the learning process
  • examine how to use active learning techniques to structure STEM education approaches that work
  • extend enhanced student engagement in the classroom to student research, mentoring, advising, all of which as a form of instruction, to promote students’ long-term knowledge construction and retention

Dr. Ron Halterman (Chemistry and Biochemistry) and Dr. Hong Lin (Education) will partner up to facilitate this FLC. Come join them. Registration here. (10 seats).

Reference
Michael, J. (2006). Where is the evidence that active learning works? Advances in Physiology Education, 30, 159-167.

Eventbrite - Effective Instruction for STEM Disciplines: From Learning Theory to College Teaching (FLC)

This FLC will explore the ways faculty across campus assign and teach writing in their courses. Weekly meetings will be led by members of the Writing Enriched Curriculum team, and our topics of discussion will range from broad issues such as how we define student writing to specific techniques for integrating writing instruction into courses in a variety of disciplines and levels. Weekly readings will help to focus our discussion, but participants are encouraged to bring specific questions, assignments, and ideas for the group.

Eventbrite - Teaching Writing in Your Discipline

Spring 2014

While learning is ultimately an individual enterprise, it is also about collaborative learning with and for others. The support of a group with a common learning objective can produce a synergistic facilitation of learning by each member of that group.

This learning community will discuss how to design an active teaching and learning framework, form disciplined team-based learning, evaluate individual contributions, and manage team dynamics. Faculty will benchmark other institutions’ models, best teaching strategies, and discipline-specific instructional materials.

Participants: 12 - 15

Eventbrite - Active and Collaborative Learning

The goal for this learning community is to share our experiences and ideas to help us better able to create positive learning environments for all of our students. There will be assigned readings for each session (TBD) and perhaps “homework” to bring sometimes (e.g., a sample syllabus for a course that one wishes to make more inclusive). There will also sometimes be guest speakers (e.g., students from diverse backgrounds) to share their experience and/or expertise.


Eventbrite - Becoming an Inclusive Teacher

The use of teaching portfolios is a widespread phenomenon and an integral component of tenure-track faculty development and assessment. It is primarily a way to help the faculty person, the department, the college, and ultimately the entire campus ensure consistency and improvement across the board, especially over the entire duration of a faculty person’s pre-tenure evaluation period.

Sample materials for the Faculty Teaching Portfolio include: a statement of teaching philosophy; teaching goals for the next five years; samples of syllabi and curricular assignment materials; the range of teaching responsibilities, including supervision of undergraduate and graduate theses; teaching self-evaluation, including possible development seminars run by CTE; a teaching video clip; and awards, presentations, and publications related to teaching. Materials for the Faculty Teaching Portfolio will also include documents by others, such as: samples of (graded) student work; student assessment and achievement; class visitation reports by peers; a statement by the department chair; students’ course evaluations and summaries; student alumni statements; and individual teaching consultations with OU's CTE staff.

First Option: Thursdays, 12 - 1

February 6, February 27,
March 6, March 27,
April 10

Eventbrite - Building Teaching Portfolio – Janet Ward - Thursday

Second Option: Fridays, 12 - 1

February 7, February 28,
March 7, March 28,
April 11

Eventbrite - Building Teaching Portfolio – Janet Ward - Friday

Researchers and educators from across an array of disciplines have been experimenting with theories, practices, and tools drawn from the digital humanities both to create new forms of scholarship, and to create new models for interactive and collaborative teaching and learning, particularly in regard to undergraduate humanities research. In this learning community we will examine relevant examples drawn from the international university community, and discuss how new types of digital humanities research projects can be integrated into the university curriculum, supporting faculty efforts to innovate with new media, and benefiting students from any major.

Space is limited to 12 participants. Once 12 have registered a waiting list will be formed.

Eventbrite - Digital Humanities – Kathleen Pandora

Participants will read How Learning Works: Seven Research-Based Principles for Smart Teaching by Ambrose et al. (2010). Participants will examine the pedagogical research behind successful strategies for collecting evidence of student learning and documenting learning gains.

Weekly meetings will address a variety of teaching contexts and emphasize practical adoption of effective practice. Topics will include Prior Knowledge, Knowledge Organization, Motivation, Mastery, Practice and Feedback, Student Development and Course Climate, and Self-Directed Learning.

Participants: 12 - 15

Tuesdays, 12:30 - 1:30 p.m. with Dr. Ryan Bisel
CTE conference room
February 4, February 11, February 25, March 4, March 11, March 25, April 1

Eventbrite - How Learning Works with Ryan Bisel

Faculty Facilitator

Dr. Ryan Bisel
Associate Professor of Organizational Communication

His research interests focus primarily on issues surrounding leadership communication, organizational culture, and behavioral ethics. Between 2007 and 2013, his research was honored with twelve Top Paper Awards from regional and national communication conferences. He was honored as the 2009 and 2011 Saxton Applied Research Award Recipient for his work in organizational change messaging and team learning, respectively. Furthermore, Bisel was awarded as the 2010 Longmire Prize Winner for excellence in Teaching and the Scholarship of Teaching. Dr. Bisel's Web page

For questions, contact Dr. Bisel at ryanbisel@ou.edu.

Mondays, 12 - 1 p.m. with Prof. Pilat and Prof. Cricchio (Only for College of Architecture)
Gould Hall 250
February 3, 10, 17, 24, March 3, 10, 24, 31, April 1
Participants: 8 - 12

Eventbrite - How Learning Works for faculty in the College of Architecture

Description

This Faculty Learning Community is for faculty in the College of Architecture (Architecture, Construction Science, Interior Design, Regional and City Planning). The degree programs in our college have well-defined sequences of courses that build on one another necessitating close collaboration among faculty to ensure students’ success. A Faculty Learning Community centered on How Learning Works would help give faculty a shared vocabulary and understanding in order to better work together to improve student-learning outcomes. For example, understanding how students’ prior knowledge affects their learning is critical to the success of five-year degree programs such as architecture.

Through a Faculty Learning Community College of Architecture faculty would develop an ability to be more self-critical and aware in regards to their teaching. Growing out of weekly discussions centered on How Learning Works, faculty would share teaching concerns and develop new strategies for tackling teaching challenges. Together faculty would develop a shared understanding of issues such as how students develop mastery, types of learning environments, and what motivates students. This would help us collectively tailor our syllabi, assignments and classroom activities to ensure the best learning outcomes.

Participants: 8 - 12.

Faculty Facilitators

Dr. Pilat portrait photo
Dr. Stephanie Zeier Pilat
Assistant Professor

Stephanie Zeier Pilat is a designer and architectural historian whose work and practice examines points of intersection between aesthetics, politics, and architecture. She is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Architecture and specializes in twentieth-century architecture, social housing, and Italian architecture.  She is currently working on a book about Ina-Casa, an Italian postwar housing program, which activated the design and construction process for social aims.  She is the recipient of Fulbright fellowship and a Rome prize from the American Academy.  Professor Pilat is also a founding partner of Reconstruct Design, a practice committed to social entrepreneurship and environmental stewardship. Dr. Pilat's Web page.

Prof Cricchio' s portrait photo
Prof. Anthony Cricchio
Assistant Professor

Anthony Cricchio is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Architecture. He joined the faculty at the College of Architecture at The University of Oklahoma in the fall 2008. Professor Cricchio holds a BS in Architecture (1993) and a MArch (1995) from the University of Texas at Arlington. He has practiced in the Dallas/Fort Worth area with Corgan Associates as well as teaching at the University of Texas at Arlington. He also held an assistant professorship position at Oklahoma State University. Professor Cricchio is a registered architect and is NCARB certified. He believes that teaching architecture is an extension of his own inquisitive nature and is evident in his pedagogical approach to the design studio. In addition, he believes in a hybrid way of teaching. A combination of practical applications and conceptual problem solving, Professor Cricchio uses design competitions as a way to explore this approach and to develop a student’s critical thinking process through design. Prof. Cricchio's Web page.

This training series will walk participants through best practice, pre production, production and post-production techniques, culminating with a professional video product. Participants will be heavily coached with full production support. Final video products will target the following:

  • a well developed, but concise course overview (2 to 6 minutes)
  • a preferred lecture module, broken into three, (6 minute max) video segments

Cohort 1

1:30 - 3:30 p.m.

Meeting One: February 7,
Meeting Two: February 21,
Meeting Three: March 7,
Meeting Four: March 28

Lab: 1:30 - 3:30 p.m., February 28

Eventbrite - Red Carpet Video Workflow for Education Cohort 1

Cohort 2

3:45 - 5:45 p.m.

Meeting One: February 7,
Meeting Two: February 21,
Meeting Three: March 7,
Meeting Four: March 28

Lab: 1:30 - 3:30 p.m., February 28

Eventbrite - Red Carpet Video Workflow for Education Cohort 2

In my first METR class period this week, I included the following question on my usual first day questionnaire: "What is the most important thing I can do to best help you learn, and to do well in this course?" I received responses from 41 out of the 42 students (all junior Met. majors) and those responses will be the topic of discussion.

I found the responses remarkably reasonable and I will try to accommodate nearly all of them. Some are purely logistical (provide lectures on D2L; be available; write and speak clearly), others show a desire to really understand the material (give examples; relate to real-time weather; have review sessions), while others desire an interactive class, with lots of energy from the instructor. It is interesting that no one wanted any radical change in teaching methodologies, high-tech classrooms, etc. No one said "easy problems" or "easy grading” - they know better!

I don't know why it took me 35 years to ask this simple question about what I can do to assist their learning; it certainly beats hearing what you should have done in the course evaluations!

Thus I am interested in discussing these responses with other faculty (are they reasonable?), and if requests from their students differ or are the same. Then we can move on to what best practices exist to accomplish the requests, teaching challenging material, critical thinking skills, etc.

Eventbrite - Helping Students Learn:  What Students Want from Us

Technology has progressed to the point where we can teach our classes in a way we have only dreamed: students actively engaged with content. Technology allows student access to course content before lecture rather than the traditional flow of information from the instructor to the student during lecture. This new paradigm or pedagogy frees up class time for greater synthesis and application of that information.  This pedagogical approach will turn your classroom into a student-centered learning environment promoting self-learning, formation of student learning communities, improved problem solving and critical thinking skills, as well as better retention.  Sessions will focus on technology, active learning, assessments, and organization of this new pedagogical paradigm.

Eventbrite - Student Engagement: Teaching the way you have always wanted

How can tablets enhance your personal and professional life? Can it ease the process of grading papers or conducting research? How can tablets be used to engage in collaborative activities to achieve greater efficiency in your workflow? During this faculty learning community, you will go beyond the basics of tablets and experience the benefits of this tool in practice. Over the course of four weeks, you will work with other faculty to further your understanding of mobile technologies and answer specific questions involving tablet integration into your profession. This faculty learning community will include learning specific features, Apps, and practices of tablets that can be utilized to enhance the workflow of those teaching and/or researching at the University of Oklahoma.

Participant limits to 12 persons per class. Participation requires application. Applicant will receive invitation to join the training once the application has been reviewed by CTE.

Note: iPads will be the tablets utilized for this faculty learning community and individuals that do not currently own an iPad will be lent one for the duration of the semester they participate in this session.

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Information literacy is an important critical thinking skill and is essential for undergraduate education. But many faculty members find that their students lack experience in identifying information sources, evaluating information, and using information ethically.

Designed for busy faculty members who are interested in improving their students’ information literacy, this series of workshops will introduce the Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education and present techniques for integrating these standards into the curriculum in ways that do not require lots of extra class time, extra assignments, or extra grading.

Eventbrite - Information Literacy Across the Curriculum

Fall 2013

One book will be central to our discussions: Engaged Writers and Dynamic Disciplines: Research on the Academic Writing Life by Christopher Thaiss & Therese Zawacki. Guiding questions for our discussions:

  • What do we value as writers and teachers of writing?
  • What do we prefer to see in students' writing? What do we allow in students' writing? And what do we prohibit? Why?
  • Why do we value what we value in our own courses and how do we express this in our syllabi and assignments?

Participants: 12 - 15

Eventbrite - Teaching Writing in Your Discipline

While learning is ultimately an individual enterprise, it is also about collaborative learning with and for others. The support of a group with a common learning objective can produce a synergistic facilitation of learning by each member of that group.

This learning community will discuss how to design an active teaching and learning framework, form disciplined team-based learning, evaluate individual contributions, and manage team dynamics. Faculty will benchmark other institutions’ models, best teaching strategies, and discipline-specific instructional materials.

Participants: 12 - 15

Eventbrite - Active and Collaborative Learning in the CORE

This faculty learning community will investigate how social media has both influenced and been implemented in higher education. Why use Twitter, Facebook, or other social media for learning? For learning what?

Discussions may focus on emergent best practices as well as on research on social media for learning. Participants will discuss how social media tools can/may influence the courses taught at OU.

Participants: 12 - 15

Eventbrite - Using Social Media for Teaching and Learning

Participants will read How Learning Works: Seven Research-Based Principles for Smart Teaching by Ambrose et al. (2010). Participants will examine the pedagogical research behind successful strategies for collecting evidence of student learning and documenting learning gains.

Weekly meetings will address a variety of teaching contexts and emphasize practical adoption of effective practice. Topics will include Prior Knowledge, Knowledge Organization, Motivation, Mastery, Practice and Feedback, Student Development and Course Climate, and Self-Directed Learning.

Participants: 12 - 15

Tuesdays, 12:30 - 1:30 p.m. with Dr. Ryan Bisel
CTE conference room
October 8, October 15, October 22, October 29, November 5, November 12, November 19

Eventbrite - How Learning Works with Ryan Bisel

Faculty Facilitator

Dr. Ryan Bisel
Associate Professor of Organizational Communication

His research interests focus primarily on issues surrounding leadership communication, organizational culture, and behavioral ethics. Between 2007 and 2013, his research was honored with twelve Top Paper Awards from regional and national communication conferences. He was honored as the 2009 and 2011 Saxton Applied Research Award Recipient for his work in organizational change messaging and team learning, respectively. Furthermore, Bisel was awarded as the 2010 Longmire Prize Winner for excellence in Teaching and the Scholarship of Teaching. Dr. Bisel's Web page

For questions, contact Dr. Bisel at ryanbisel@ou.edu.

Wednesdays, 12 - 1 p.m. with Dr. Daniel Emery (Starts September 25)

Eventbrite - How Learning Works with Daniel Emery

Faculty Facilitator

Dr. Daniel Emery
Assistant Professor of Business Communication Curriculum Leader

Dr. Emery oversees the program in Business Communication for the Price College of Business. His responsibilities include coordinating multiple sections of Business Communication 2813, teaching business communication classes, and assisting with writing instruction throughout the undergraduate programs in Price College. Dr. Emery's research interests include comparative disciplinary rhetorics, writing studies, and the history of the teaching of speaking and writing.

Prior to joining the faculty at Price College, Dr. Emery served as Assistant Professor of Communication and Writing at the University of Utah, where he also directed the University Writing Center. At Iowa, he completed an interdisciplinary certificate with the Project on the Rhetoric of Inquiry and was a Ballard/Seashore Fellow with the Graduate College. Dr. Emery earned his Ph.D. in Communication at the University of Iowa.

For questions, contact Dr. Emery at daniel.emery@ou.edu or (405) 325-5887.

Varies, 8 - 9 a.m. with Dr. Mark Morvant (Starts September 16, *coffee and doughnuts provided)

Eventbrite - How Learning Works with Mark Morvant

Faculty Facilitator

Dr. Morvant's portrait photo

Dr. Mark Morvant
Executive Director of the Center for Teaching Excellence
Professor, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry

Mark Morvant is the executive director of the Center for Teaching Excellence. Under his leadership, the Center assists faculty with the implementation of technology-driven course enhancements and the use of advanced features in online course management systems. Morvant joined OU in 2006 as an associate professor of chemistry. In 2011, he was named assistant chair of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. In addition, he has taught the First-Year Mentoring Program and has developed and leads the conjoined study abroad courses. While at OU, he has been recognized with the College of Arts and Sciences’ Longmire Prize for Outstanding Teaching and with the Regents’ Award for Superior Teaching. Morvant earned his bachelor of science in chemistry magna cum laude from Tarleton State University and his doctoral degree in organic chemistry from the University of Oklahoma.

For questions, contact Dr. Morvant at mmorvant@ou.edu.

Tuesdays, 2 - 3 p.m. for Graduate Students (Starts September 24)

Eventbrite - How Learning Works for Graduate Students

Facilitator

Angie's portrait photo

Angie Calton
Instructional Designer

As an Instructional Designer, Angie Calton consults on course design and content production, and supports faculty training and development. Calton has been involved in a range of instructional projects and initiatives. Before joining CTE, she was an instructional designer in digital game-based learning at the K-20 Center. As the Academic Operations Manager for EF Education, she provided educational leadership and faculty development. Additionally, she worked as the Chief Development Editor at englishtown.com, where she served as the instructional designer on a multi-million dollar project. Calton has a bachelor of arts in humanities from the University of Kansas.