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The University of Oklahoma
Expository Writing
THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA

Expository Writing Faculty

George Cusack
Director of Expository Writing
Expo Courses: Boomer Sooner, Irish Troubles and Triumphs, Games People Play
Office: Bizzell Library, Room 4
Email: gcusack@ou.edu

George Cusack earned his PhD in Irish literature from the University of Oregon.  He's the author of The Politics of Identity in Irish Drama (2008, Routledge Press) and the co-editor of Hungry Words: Images of Famine in the Irish Canon (2004, Irish Academic Press).  Dr. Cusack came to OU in the Fall of 2007, and ever since he’s had the outstandingly good fortune to develop courses on the subjects he loves most, including the craft of writing, Irish culture, superheroes, and OU itself.  He's currently working on a way to build a course around video games and terrible sci-fi/horror movies.


Eric Bosse
Lecturer
Expo Courses: Religious Satire, Political Satire, Transcending Gender, The Writing Life
Office: Cross A Bass C40
Email: ericbosse@ou.edu

Eric Bosse received an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Montana.  He writes fiction and creative nonfiction, in addition to his academic work. He also blogs and makes short movies and videos. He has published more than forty short stories in such magazines and journals as The Sun, Mississippi Review, Exquisite Corpse, Zoetrope, Eclectica, Night Train, The Collagist, and Wigleaf. His story collection, Magnificent Mistakes, will be released in 2011 by Ravenna Press.

 


Liz Locke
Lecturer
Expo Course: Myth and Hero
Office: Bizzell Library, Room 4
Email: lizlocke@ou.edu

Liz Locke holds a Ph.D. in Folklore from Indiana University. She has taught undergraduate courses in American Folklore, cosmology, analytical psychology, and philosophy at Indiana University (Bloomington and Columbus) and Indiana State University (Terre Haute), directed the graduate and undergraduate Interdisciplinary Studies Programs at Naropa University (Boulder), and taught courses in Anthropology and Religious Studies at Oklahoma University (Norman). She co-edited (with Theresa A. Vaughan and Pauline Greenhill) The Encyclopedia of Women’s Folklore and Folklife published in two volumes by Greenwood Press in 2009. Her ongoing research interests include feminist classical studies; race, class, and gender theory; film and advertising semiotics; and the persistence of myth in American political and popular culture.

 


Bridget Love
Lecturer
Expo Course: Food and Power, Japan in Disaster
Office: Cross A Bass C42
Email: loveb@ou.edu

Bridget Love is a cultural anthropologist (Ph.D. University of Michigan). Her research examines rural outmigration, aging, kinship, gender, and the environment in contemporary Japan, where she has conducted long-term ethnographic fieldwork. She is currently working on a book that explores the upheavals of rural depopulation in Japan, and analyzes strategies to sustain an aging and emptying countryside through tourism and boutique farming initiatives. Her most recent research interests focus on female activism to promote food safety, preserve native culinary heritage, and invigorate regional farm economies in Japan. In addition to Expository Writing Program courses on tourism, kinship, and food, she teaches classes for OU’s Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the Environment Program and Women’s and Gender Studies.

 


Catherine Mintler
Lecturer
Expo Course: What Is Work?, American Gangster
Office: Bizzell Library, Room 4
Email: crmintler@ou.edu

Catherine Mintler received a PhD in English and Gender and Women’s Studies Concentration from the University of Illinois at Chicago. Her scholarly interests involve how fashion, department stores, and new modes of consumerism influenced gender, racial, class and sexual identity as represented in literary texts penned by proto-modernist and modernist writers like Henry James, Virginia Woolf, Jean Rhys, Ernest Hemingway, and James Weldon Johnson; in particular, she examines how references to such writers utilized clothing and consumerism to re-conceptualize, renegotiate and occasionally contest prescriptive and normative conceptions of identity.  Dr. Mintler is a recipient of a National Endowment for the Humanities fellowship, an Annette Kolodny Award, a Smith Reynolds Founders Fellowship from the Ernest Hemingway Foundation and Society, a Gender and Women’s Studies Graduate Prize from the University of Illinois at Chicago, and a Regent’s Fellowship from the University of Nevada, Reno. Her most recent article, “From Aesthete to Gangster: the Dandy Figure in the Novels of F. Scott Fitzgerald,” appears in The F. Scott Fitzgerald Review, Vol. 8, 2010.

 


Matthias Rudolf
Lecturer
Expo Course:Bioethics and the Politics of Life, Guns and Democracy
Office: Bizzell Library, Room 4
Email: mprudolf@ou.edu

Matthias Rudolf received his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He taught at the University of Nevada, Reno before moving to the University of Oklahoma. He has published on romantic literature, post-colonial theory, and is the co-editor, with Alastair Hunt, of the RCPS issue “Biopolitics, Literature, Romanticism.”

 


Robert Scafe
Lecturer
Expo Courses: Violence and the Sacred; Music, Sound, and Noise
Office: Cross A Bass C41
Email: rscafe@ou.edu

Robert Scafe is a historian and writing teacher currently in his fifth year as a Lecturer in OU’s Expository Writing Program. Trained in French history at Stanford University, Dr. Scafe received a Fulbright grant to support his research at the French National Institute of Demographic Studies(Institut National d’Etudes Demographiques) in 2000-2001. His work on early French statistical inquiries has received acclaim at international forums such as the Gimon Conference on French Political Economy and the annual meeting of French Historical Studies, and he is currently revising his book manuscript, “The Measure of Greatness: The Politics of Population under Louis XIV.” As the co-organizer of OU’s French Culture Workshop, Dr. Scafe actively promotes research in French studies across disciplines and campuses within the State of Oklahoma.
Since coming to OU, Dr. Scafe has developed a second research project on writing pedagogy and historical practice. An invited speaker at the History Department’s 2010 Pedagogy Workshop, he is currently consulting with history faculty on integrating writing instruction into their seminar courses. Dr. Scafe presented the results of these collaborations at a 2011 American Historical Association panel on “Writing, History, and Composition Pedagogy.”

 


Jennifer Shaiman
Lecturer
Expo Courses: Monsters Among Us, The World of Tomorrow, Games People Play
Office: Bizzell Library, Room 4
Email: jshaiman@ou.edu

Jennifer received her PhD in American Literature from the University of Oregon in 2004. Her primary academic interest is in the way authors use descriptions of homes to engage in a conversation about the changing nature of personal and national identities. She is also interested in how this carries over to the real world where we express who we are though the places we inhabit.  Her Expo courses also allow her to explore some of her “geekier” academic interests, such as how horror movies and science fiction reflect the social problems that we perceive in our present society.

 


Kathryn Steele
Lecturer
Expo Course: Media Shifts, The Jane Austen Meme
Office: Bizzell Library, Room 4
Email: ksteele@ou.edu

Kathryn received Ph.D. (2008) and M.A. (2003) degrees from Rutgers University and M.A. and B.A. degrees from the University of Colorado.  Her research interests include literary history and media ecology, with a focus on histories of reading.  She is currently working on a project examining the readers of Samuel Richardson’s Clarissa.  Her Expository Writing class, Media Shifts, asks students to think about contemporary and historical media shifts, our use of various media, and the implications of “new media” for communities large and small.  She has essays on Clarissa and the history of reading in Eighteenth-Century Fiction and forthcoming The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation.

 


Sam Temple


Lecturer

Expo Course: Wild Things, Living Dangerously

Office: Cross A Bass C45

stemple@ou.edu



Sam Temple holds a doctorate in history (University of Michigan, 2010). He specializes in French and environmental history and his research interests include state-building,  disaster studies, the politics of natural resources, built environments and environmental risk. He has published articles in French Historical Studies and Environment and History and is currently working on two new projects: a book chapter on the transnational impact of French forestry and an article on the politics of natural disaster in southern France. He has taught three seminars in Expository Writing that loosely draw on his intellectual interests, if not geographical specialty: “Oil, Water, Blood”; “Toxic Environments”; and “Surviving Suburbia.” Sam is also an adjunct lecturer in IPE where he teaches courses on natural disasters and global environmental history.