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Expository Writing Faculty

Expository Writing Faculty

George Cusack

Director of Expository Writing

Expo Courses: Boomer Sooner; Irish Troubles and Triumphs; Games People Play

Office: Bizzell Library, Room 4

Email: gcusack@ou.edu

George Cusack has been the Director of the Expository Writing Program since 2010. He earned his PhD in Irish literature from the University of Oregon, and he's the author of The Politics of Identity in Irish Drama (2008, Routledge Press). He has edited two books, Hungry Words: Images of Famine in the Irish Canon (2004, Irish Academic Press), and The Selected Plays of Paul Vincent Carroll (2013, Colin-Smythe). He also serves at the director of the Writing Enriched Curriculum (WEC) project, which consults with departments across campus to help faculty develop writing curricula within their major classes.




Eric Bosse


Lecturer

Expo Courses: Religious Satire; Political Satire; Transcending Gender; The Writing Life

Office: Cross A Bass C40

Email: ericbosse@ou.edu



Eric Bosse received an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Montana. He writes fiction and creative nonfiction, in addition to his academic work. He also blogs and makes short movies and videos. He has published more than forty short stories in such magazines and journals as The Sun, Mississippi Review, Exquisite Corpse, Zoetrope, Eclectica, Night Train, The Collagist, and Wigleaf. His story collection, Magnificent Mistakes, will be released in 2011 by Ravenna Press.


Liz Locke
Lecturer
Expo Courses: Myth and Hero; Identity and Representation
Office: Bizzell Library, Room 4
Email: lizlocke@ou.edu

Liz Locke holds a Ph.D. in Folklore from Indiana University. She has taught undergraduate courses in American Folklore, cosmology, analytical psychology, and philosophy at Indiana University (Bloomington and Columbus) and Indiana State University (Terre Haute), directed the graduate and undergraduate Interdisciplinary Studies Programs at Naropa University (Boulder), and taught courses in Anthropology and Religious Studies at the University of Oklahoma (Norman). She co-edited (with Theresa A. Vaughan and Pauline Greenhill) The Encyclopedia of Women’s Folklore and Folklife published by Greenwood Press in 2009. Her ongoing research interests include feminist classical studies; race, class, and gender theory; film and advertising semiotics; and the persistence of myth in American political and popular culture.


V. Nicholas LoLordo
Lecturer:
Expo Courses: Keepin' It Real: the Rhetoric of Authenticity; From Poets to Rockstars: The Creative Artist From Fame to Celebrity; American Genius: the Case of Gertrude Stein
Office: Bizzell Library, Room 4
Email: vnlolordo@ou.edu

V. Nicholas LoLordo holds a PhD. in English and American Literature from Harvard University. Before arriving at OU, he taught at Colorado State University and the University of Nevada-Las Vegas. His primary research area is modern and contemporary English-language poetry and poetics; he has published articles in Arizona Quarterly, Contemporary Literature, the Wallace Stevens Journal and Postmodern Culture. His most recent Expo course is "American Genius: the Case of Gertrude Stein," a Presidential Dream Course in the fall 2014 semester.


Bridget Love
Lecturer
Expo Courses: Food and Power; Japan in Disaster; Global Tourism
Office: Cross Center B, Buchanan C42
Email: loveb@ou.edu

Bridget Love received a PhD in cultural anthropology from the University of Michigan. Her most recent fieldwork examines volunteerism, social activism, and disaster recovery following Japan’s 2011 earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear meltdown. Based on her long-term ethnographic research in Japan, she is completing the book manuscript Places at the Their Limits: the Problem of Sustainability in Rural Japan. Bridget is a former fellow of the Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society at Ludwig-Maximilians University. Her research has been funded by grants from Fulbright, the Social Sciences Research Council, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, and the Japan Foundation. She has published articles in American Anthropologist and Critical Asian Studies, as well as chapters in edited volumes on food in Japan, ethics in anthropology, and global disasters. At OU, Bridget is also affiliate faculty in the Department of Anthropology.


Catherine Mintler
Lecturer
Expo Course: American Gangster; What Is Work?
Office: Bizzell Library, Room 4
Email: crmintler@ou.edu

Catherine Mintler joined the Expository Writing Program in 2008, after completing a PhD in English and a Gender and Women’s Studies at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Dr. Mintler’s current book project is a study of the influence of modernist aesthetics, sartorial modernism in particular, upon constructions of identity in nineteenth- and twentieth-century literature. A related, secondary project explores the evolution of a post-war wounded flâneur. Dr. Mintler is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship, an Annette Kolodny Award, a Smith Reynolds Founders Fellowship from the Ernest Hemingway Foundation and Society, the University of Illinois at Chicago’s Gender and Women’s Studies Prize, a Regent’s Fellowship from the University of Nevada, Reno, and OU’s Presidential International Travel Fellowship. She has published her work in the Rocky Mountain Review, The Journal of International Women’s Studies, and The F. Scott Fitzgerald Review. A chapter titled “Economic Power and the Female Expatriate Consumer Artist in The Garden of Eden” is forthcoming in Teaching Hemingway and Gender. Dr. Mintler has offered several Expository Writing Program seminars, including Fashion & Identity, What is Work? and American Gangster, and will offer an upper-level writing seminar on Consumption & Consumer Identity. She is also developing a new course called Watching the Detectives, which traces our modern understanding of vision as influenced by the scientific, historical, theoretical, and literary contexts that produced the modern detective.


Matthias Rudolf


Lecturer

Expo Course: Bioethics and the Politics of Life; Guns and Democracy; Poetry Matters

Office: Bizzell Library, Room 4

Email: mprudolf@ou.edu

Matthias Rudolf teaches Expository Writing Courses on subjects ranging from bioethics and biopolitics to guns, democracy, and matters of poetry at the University of Oklahoma. He has published on romantic literature and post-colonial theory and is the co-editor, with Alastair Hunt (PSU), of the RCPS issue “Biopolitics and Romanticism." His most recent article, “Mute Responsiveness,” (Against Life, 2014) reconsiders apostrophe’s rhetoric of calling from the vantage point of biopolitical rationality.


Robert Scafe

Lecturer
Expo Courses: Violence and the Sacred; Music, Sound, and Noise.
Office: Bizzell Library, Room 4
Email: rscafe@ou.edu

Robert Scafe received his doctorate in history from Stanford University in 2006. He enjoys investigating our most taken-for-granted categories of social analysis—“the economy,” “population,” and “society” itself—by asking when and how these terms came into being. He pursues this line of inquiry by studying French King Louis XIV’s efforts to gather information about his subjects and the resistance of political and religious groups to these new statistical inquiries. Painfully aware that this topic might seem obscure to first-year students, Robert taught his first Expos course—“Violence and the Sacred”—on the history of sacred violence from Cain and Abel through the persecution of Jews in the Middle Ages and up to the terrorist attacks on 9/11. More recently, he has taught “Music, Sound, and Noise,” an exploration of sound studies and musical dissonance which was designated a Presidential Dream Course in 2013. In addition to offering these Expository Writing courses, Robert currently serves as the Writing Coordinator for the U.S. History Survey at O.U.


Jennifer Shaiman

Lecturer

Expo Courses: Monsters Among Us; The World of Tomorrow; Games People Play; No Place Like Home; Beyond the Page; The Future of Writing
Office: Bizzell Library, Room 4

Email: jshaiman@ou.edu



Jennifer Shaiman received her PhD in American Literature from the University of Oregon in 2004. Her primary academic interest is in the way authors use descriptions of homes to engage in a conversation about the changing nature of personal and national identities. She is also interested in how this carries over to the real world where we express who we are though the places we inhabit.  Her Expo courses also allow her to explore some of her “geekier” academic interests, such as how horror movies and science fiction reflect the social problems that we perceive in our present society. Jennifer serves as a Coordinator for the Writing Enriched Curriculum Program.


Kathryn Steele

Lecturer
Expo Course: Media Shifts; The Jane Austen Meme; Beyond the Page; The Future of Writing
Office: Bizzell Library, Room 4
Email: ksteele@ou.edu

Kathryn Steele received Ph.D. in Literary Studies in English from Rutgers University (2008).  Her research interests include literary history, the history of the British novel, Samuel Richardson, and media ecology. She is particularly interested in histories and practices of reading now and in the past. Her Expository Writing classes—Beyond the Page and The Future of Writing (both co-taught with Dr. Jennifer Shaiman) and Media Shifts—ask students to think about contemporary and historical media change, our use of various media, and the implications of “new media” for communities large and small. Another course, The Jane Austen Meme, has fun with all things Austen and examines Austen’s texts within their historical context and within contemporary culture. Dr. Steele’s work is published in Eighteenth-Century Fiction; The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation; and is forthcoming the Wiley-Blackwell Encyclopedia of British Literature 1660-1789.


Sam Temple

Lecturer
Expo Courses: Global Resource Conflicts
; Mapping Suburbia; Toxic Environments; Animals and Us; Living Dangerously; Paris Through the Ages
Office: Cross Center B, Buchanan C45
Email: stemple@ou.edu

Sam Temple received his Ph.D in history from the University of Michigan (2010). He specializes in modern French and environmental history and his research interests include state-building, colonialism, urban planning, and environmental risk. He has published several articles on the politics of landscape and geo-engineering in southern France and Algeria, as well as edited special volumes on climate migration and the Fukushima nuclear disaster. He is currently working on the book manuscript Unruly Landscapes: Agency, Environment and State-making in Modern France about the political uses of nature in modern France. In addition to Expository Writing, he has also taught in OU’s History Department and the Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the Environment program, offering classes on modern European history and disaster studies.