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Center for Quantum Research and Technology (CQRT)

News

Nov 08, 2019

CQRT Director interviewed BY KGOU

The CQRT director Alberto Marino was interviewed by KGOU at the inauguration of the Center for Quantum Technology. The area of quantum physics could generate billions of dollars worth of technology over the next decade. The interview can be found at https://www.kgou.org/post/oklahoma-invests-quantum-technology-research

Oct 30, 2019

Post doctoral and graduate research positions available

Now accepting applications to join a vibrant and exciting new research team focused on implementations of quantum information processing in neutral atom systems.  Our group explores facets of quantum control ranging from quantum sensing with atom interferometers to multi-atom entanglement using interactions between ultra-cold Rydberg atoms in optical tweezers. Contact Grant Biedermann for more information:  biedermann@ou.edu

October 25, 2019

Blume Group has Physical Review A hat-trick!

The Blume group published three papers in October issue of Physical Review A

OU postdoc Dr. Qingze Guan carefully mapped out the energy landscape of two and three identical bosons in the presence of one-dimensional spin-orbit coupling, shedding new light on Efimov’s generalized radial scaling law: 

https://journals.aps.org/pra/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevA.100.042708

published October 21, 2019

Prof. Doerte Blume collaborated with Prof. Dajun Wang’s experimental group from the Chinese University of Hong Kong on an intriguing dimer-dimer inelastic collision resonance. Thanks to the Wang team for taking such beautiful experimental few-body data!

https://journals.aps.org/pra/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevA.100.042706

published October 14, 2019

OU postdocs Dr. Jianwen Jie and Dr. Qingze Guan explored the performance of so-called SU(1,1) interferometers and investigated the benefits of entangling spin-dependent collisions for state preparation and state readout:

https://journals.aps.org/pra/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevA.100.043606

published October 11, 2019

August 12, 2019

CQRT Dedication Ceremony on October 25

The dedication of the Center for Quantum Research and Technology (CQRT) will take place on Friday, October 25 at 2:30pm.

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October 20, 2019

Presidential Dream Course on Quantum Hybrid Systems

A second quantum technology revolution is upon us!  The first used the laws of quantum physics to design systems in which the energy is “quantized,” to allow only certain values. This idea is at the heart of technology ranging from TV remotes to supercomputers. Now, two other features of quantum mechanics, entanglement and superposition, are becoming accessible to control. To do so we must unite the incredible delicacy and uniformity of single atoms with the robust control and reproducibility of larger devices, forming “quantum hybrid systems.” 

This Presidential Dream course will give students competence in the fundamentals so that they may pursue research and careers in this field.  As part of the course world experts will come to OU to give lectures and meet with students.  

More Information

August 8, 2019

CQRT Opens Multiple Faculty Positions

The Center for Quantum Research and Technology is receiving applications for five faculty positions in the areas of Atomic, Molecular, and Optical (AMO) and Condensed Matter (CM) physics.

More Information and Apply

June 22, 2019

OU Physicists Predict Novel Mott State in Graphene at the Magic Angle

A University of Oklahoma physics group sheds light on a novel Mott state observed in twisted graphene bilayers at the 'magic angle' in a recent study just published in Physical Review Letters.

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May 23, 2019

Schwettmann Wins NSF Career Award

OU Physics Professor Arne Schwettmann is the recipient of a National Science Foundation CAREER (Faculty Early Career Development Program) Award for research on ultra cold atoms.

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March 1, 2019

Theory-Experiment Team Observed Quantum Mechanical Two-Body Collisions One at a Time

To better understand atomic collisions, Qingze Guan of the University of Oklahoma in Norman and colleagues from  Heidelberg University developed a way to watch two atoms crash together.

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