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Faculty Fellows 2018-2019

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Faculty Fellows

Theme-based Workshop Series: Extreme Makeover: Course Edition

12:00 pm - 1:30 pm on 02/13, 02/28, 03/13, 03/28 
Old Science Building, Room 103


Join Dr. Tarren Shaw for a multi-week session on course development. These DIY-themed workshops are for faculty and graduate students who may want to design a new course or remodel an existing course to maximize student engagement and learning. All attendees are encouraged to participate and bring any instructional resources (such as a class syllabus, exams, or list of outcomes) for their current or future courses. Hard hats and tool belts are optional.

1. Location, Location, Location: Situational factors that can make or break course development and instruction. Wednesday, 02/13

  • Build a course with “good bones.” Class size, room layout, student demographics, and prior knowledge are all important factors often overlooked when planning a course. Common faculty mistakes, and tools for identifying important situational factors that can maximize student engagement will be presented and discussed.

2. Building with backward design: How to create course goals and learning outcomes that inspire lifelong learning. Thursday, 02/28

  • What do you want your students to have learned or be able to do as a result of your class? Developing course goals and learning outcomes first can help clarify this question. Tools for writing measurable outcomes that inspire critical thinking and learning will be presented and discussed.

3. Knocking down walls: Teaching and learning activities that increase classroom engagement. Wednesday, 03/13

  • Our students learn best by talking and doing, yet the lecture method of teaching requires that students be passive recipients of information. If we expect our students to become critical thinking and lifelong learners, we must provide classroom experiences that promote the traits. Several strategies for modifying lectures so that students engage in critical thinking and discussion will be presented and discussed. 

4. Passing inspection: Assessment strategies that help students learn and make you a better teacher. Thursday, 03/28

  • Are your current exams, quizzes, and clicker questions accurately measuring your course learning outcomes? This session will present several types of assessments while providing tips for writing and evaluating good multiple-choice questions for assessing higher-order and critical thinking.

Register>>

 

Tarren Shaw,

Dr. Tarren Shaw
Lecturer
View Bio »

Fall 2018: Student Cultivation

Current educational research recommends that we modify our classroom teaching practices to increase student engagement via active-learning strategies that promote high-order thinking skills. But what if students revolt and demand to be told only what they “need to know for the test?” Generating student buy-in for active learning during the first weeks of the semester is a crucial, but often overlooked step to ensure that students are accepting of your transformative efforts.

Workshops and faculty learning communities will be offered under the theme of student cultivation. Major topics include: 1) Planting the seed: Generating student buy-in for the active learning classroom and teaching methods; 2) Spreading the fertilizer: Classroom activities and formative assessments for the Growth Mindset; and 3) Utilizing Bloom’s Taxonomy when revising learning outcomes and developing new test questions faculty can help blossom into lifelong learners.

Making Your Course and Exams Bloom

Location: Old Science Building, Room 103

12:00-1:30, Wednesdays, 10/31, 11/7, and 11/14

Make your course Bloom: Evaluating exams and course learning outcomes with Bloom’s Taxonomy.
Bring your syllabus, student learning outcomes, and an exam and we will make it “Bloom!”

  • Week 1, 10/31: Bring a copy of your exam and we will discuss the following:
    • Can high-order thinking be assessed with multiple choice exams? -Yes!
    • It’s not a trick: Tips and suggestions for writing good exam questions
    • Avoid assessment dissonance: “High Order” learning outcomes but “Low Order” exam questions
    • Use Bloom’s Taxonomy to identify the cognitive level of your exam questions
  • Week 2, 11/7: Bring a copy of your syllabus and/or course learning outcomes and we will discuss the following:
    • Some good (and bad) examples of learning outcomes
    • High Order and Low Order skills – what proportion is ideal for your course?
    • Use Blooms Taxonomy to clarify student learning outcomes (and increase student success!)
  • Week 3, 11/14: Bring a copy of your syllabus and/or course learning outcomes and we will discuss the following:
    • The person who is talking is the one who is learning.
    • What do you want your students to be doing during the lecture?
    • Classroom techniques that promote High Order skills.
    • What is Backwards Design and why you should use it.

(Both faculty and graduate student are welcome to attend.The program was designed as an ongoing learning community. However, if you are only interested in attending a couple of sessions, please also register below, too.)

Location: Old Science Building, Room 103

October 9th, 2018 | 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM

You want to revise your course to incorporate the latest findings from educational research, but how your students receive your new approach? Ideas and strategies to generate student buy-in will be presented and discussed. This workshop will cover the following details

  1. Developing a working definition of active learning
    • What does it mean to you?
    • What do you think it means to students?
    • How is it implemented in your classroom?
  2. The roots of resistance to active learning
    • Expectancy violation – “I had to think for myself!”
    • Teacher misbehaviors – Are you guilty?
  3. How to reduce resistance and increase buy-in for your active learning classroom
    • Decrease the social distance
    • Activities that demonstrate advantages of active learning to students
    • Use learning objectives, rubrics, and peer evaluations to increase equity
    • Use additional (and non-traditional) evaluations of teaching

For OU Faculty and Graduate Students.

Location: Old Science Building, Room 103

October 24th, 2018 | 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM

You’re utilizing active learning strategies to engage students, but how will you (and your students) determine if they are meeting your learning goals? Various in-class assessments of active learning will be introduced and discussed

  1. The importance of student buy-in for assessment success
    • Identifying fixed, growth mindset
    • Generating student buy-in for active learning assessments
  2. Determining appropriate assessments
    • Time on task – what do you want students to do?
    • Utilizing Bloom’s Taxonomy – what skill should the task promote?
  3. Examples of formative assessments and strategies learning classroom
    • Using the physical space of the classroom to your advantage
    • “Think, pair, share” and small groups
    • Personal Response devices (Clickers/Top hat)
    • 5x8 Notecards
    • Case Studies
    • Journals/blue books
    • Question/discussion forums
    • Just in Time quizzes
      • Decrease the social distance
      • Activities that demonstrate advantages of active learning to students
      • Use learning objectives, rubrics, and peer evaluations to increase equity
      • Use additional (and non-traditional) evaluations of teaching