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Transition Education Materials

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Transition Education Materials

Tying the Knot

Tying the Knot-Marrying English Language Arts Objectives and Transition Competencies

Transition skills and academic skills can be taught simultaneously. With this tool, we aligned Oklahoma English Language Arts Standards and research-identified skills students need to obtain employment or participate in further education after high school. The activities and annual transition goals are arranged on a continuum to accommodate students with the least support needs to students with more support needs.

We intend this tool to be used as a guide to generate additional annual transition goals using core standards. The examples given may be modified to better suit the students you teach. The measurable statements should bemodified to meet the needs of individual students.

ME! Lessons for Teaching Self-Awareness and Self-Advocacy

ME! Lessons for Teaching Self-Awareness and Self-Advocacy

The ME! Lessons for Teaching Self-Awareness and Self-Advocacy materials and activities teach students to understand their disability and abilities, rights and responsibilities, and self-advocacy skills. During the lessons each student develops a portfolio containing critical information and documents to help students transition from high school to postsecondary settings. The ME! Lessons include detailed lesson plans aligned with both the Common Core standards and the Oklahoma Priority Academic Student Skills (PASS), PowerPoint presentations, pencil-paper activities, interactive group activities, performance assessments, and a research project.

ME! Transition Bell Ringers

ME! Transition Bell Ringers

The Transition Bell Ringers are derived from the Me! Lessons and designed to be short journaling activities. These can be completed independently during the first few minutes of class once a week throughout the school year. The bell ringers focus on the areas of self-awareness, disability awareness, goal setting, and students gaining the knowledge to lead their IEPs. There are two versions of the bell ringers, one for secondary students and one for elementary age students or secondary students working on alternate achievement standards. Also, we provided real life transitional math bell ringers aligned with personal financial literacy objectives. All three versions of bell ringers include approximately 50 slides, not all of the slides have to be used, and can be downloaded and adapted for teacher’s preferences.

Student-Directed Transition Planning Lesson Materials

Student-Directed Transition Planning Lesson Materials

Student-Directed Transition Planning (SDTP) lesson materials systematically teach students to complete their student-directed summary of performance. Using student, family, and educator information, students determine their postschool goals and learn other aspects about themselves. SDTP offers a detailed Teacher's Guide with step-by-step instructional suggestions. Tools include PowerPoint presentations, pencil and paper activities. Two research studies found that SDTP increases students transition knowledge. SDTP works best when used alongside the Self-Directed IEP.

IEP Team Education Module to Increase Student Involvement

IEP Team Education Module to Increase Student Involvement

The Self-Directed IEP instructional program increases student participation in IEP meeting discussions. To achieve even greater student involvement, IEP team members need to learn their roles to facilitate active student participation.  We conducted a study at the Oklahoma School for the Blind that demonstrated the positive additive effect of an IEP Team Education Module.  An analysis of the results showed that the IEP Team Education Module had a moderate to large effect on increasing student participation compared to the effect attained by the Self-Directed IEP instructional program.

It's Not Easy

It's Not Easy

Dr Jamie Van Dycke interviewed high school students across Oklahoma regarding their opinions about participating in their own IEP meeting. She developed the "It's Not Easy" automated PowerPoint slide to disseminate the results of her interviews. It demonstrates the importance of providing students the opportunity to actively participate in their IEP meetings.

Whose Future Is It Anyway? 2nd Edition: A Student-Directed Transition Planning Process

Whose Future Is It Anyway? 2nd Edition

Whose Future Is It Anyway? helps prepare students for their IEP meetings and gain self-determination skills through six sections that contain 36 lesson sessions.