Alumni

Santiago Drexler

Santiago received his B.S degree in Chemical Engineering in 2007 at the University of Buenos Aires, Argentina. After that, he worked for an international beverage producing company in the Quality Control Department. In 2009 he started working on his M. S. degree in Chemical Engineering under the supervision of Dr. Daniel Resasco. His research focuses on the study of nanohybrids as catalysts for the partial oxidation of organic compounds. The main field of application of his work is in Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) in a project funded by the Advanced Energy Consortium (AEC). Santiago enjoys traveling to many different parts of the world and learning about different cultures. Among his hobbies, he likes watching movies and working out at the gym. He obtained his Masters degree in 2011.

Currently, Santiago works as a Technical Consulting Engineer in the Recovery Technologies area focusing in EOR and Nanotechnology at Petrobras in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. He also evaluates projects in AEC and other technology development institutions and companies.

 

Cristina Caamaño

Cristina Caamaño received her B.S. degree in Chemical Engineering at the Universidad de Concepción in Concepción, Chile in 2007. During her undergraduate studies she joined the ASIF group (Surface Analysis and its Interaction with Fluids), where she worked preparing ultra-thin films of cellulose and their AFM characterization. By the last year of her undergraduate studies, she participated in an internship research program with Dr. Resasco in the CBME department at the University of Oklahoma. In 2008 she joined the graduate program in the same college, and started working for Dr. Resasco in the Carbon Nanotubes group. She is currently working in the application of carbon nanotubes as fillers for electrically conductive composite materials. She obtained her PhD in 2011.

 

 

Veronica Irurzun

Veronica M. Irurzun received her B.S. in 2005 in Chemical Engineering at the National University of Mar del Plata, Argentina. In 2006 she joined the PhD program at the School of Chemical, Biological and Materials Engineering at the University of Oklahoma under the supervision of Dr. Resasco. Her research involves the controlled production of carbon nano-materials (SWNTs, MWNTs, etc) and their applications and characterization. Veronica enjoys water sports. Rafting, kayaking, and duckie are her favorite ones. She practices rafting often and her latest adventure was in Canon City on the Arkansas River. She obtained her PhD in 2011. Veronica continues working as a Post Doc in the Nanotube group.

 

 

 

 

James Brown

James Brown obtained his B.S. in Chemistry from East Central University in Ada, Oklahoma in 2008. Currently, he is a M.S. student and works on the synthesis and characterization of thin multiwalled carbon nanotubes. His research is focused on the characterization of the catalyst used to make nanotubes, as well as determining effects of temperature, reaction time, and flow rates on the nanotube growth. For characterizing the nanotubes, he uses a variety of techniques including raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy.

 

 

 

 

Daniel Smith

Daniel Smith obtained his B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Oklahoma in 2007. After graduation he worked for two years in ExxonMobile´s polypropylene films plant located in Shawnee, OK.
He joined Dr. Resasco´s group in June of 2009 as a M.S. student. His research is focused on carbon nanotubes/polymer nancomposites.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Giulio Lolli

Giulio Lolli got his B.S./M.S. in Chemical Engineering from Politecnico di Milano (Italy) in October of 2003. Before graduation he joined Dr. Forzatti's heterogeneous catalysis group at the same university. His thesis work was based on the characterization and control of the sol-gel transition in dispersible nanostructured alumina slurries used as washcoats in supported catalysts. After graduation he worked as a R&D engineer in a semiconductor packaging company in Italy. In 2004 he joined Dr. Resasco's group. He obtained his PhD in 2008. His work was based on the production and tailoring of SWNT to meet the needs of specific applications.

 

 

 

Stefano Cosma

Stefano Cosma was born in Cremona (Italy). He graduated in chemical engineering from the Politecnico di Milano (Milan) in 2004 and joined Dr. Resasco's group in January of 2006 for a Masters Degree. His thesis work in Italy was based on the production of MWNTs using Fe/Al2O3 catalyst, and their use in gas sensor applications. He obtained his Masters degree in 2008. His research was based on the production of SWNTs using Co-Mo catalyst on Si wafers.

 

 

 

 

Federico Scodelaro

Federico Scodelaro got his B.S. degree in Chemical Engineering from the Universidad Nacional del Sur (Bahia Blanca, Argentina) in July of 2004. His thesis work involved the preparation of synthetic clays for use as a filler in polyolefin-based nanocomposites. In August of 2004 he joined Dr. Resasco's group where he focused on the electrical properties of SWNTs and their applications in Fuel Cells and Sensing devices. He received his M.S. in Chemical Engineering in 2007. He is currently working in Washington D.C..

 

 

 

Leandro Balzano

Leandro Balzano, co-founder and former chief development engineer of Southwest NanoTechnologies, is a Chemical Engineer in the area of Catalysis and Reactor Design. He conducted research at the Catalysis Laboratory at Universidad de Buenos Aires where he designed catalytic reactors for the production of Acetal, which is an oxygenated additive for Diesel. With Exxon Corp. (Argentina) he developed departmental tasks automation programs. In October of 1999 he joined Dr. Resasco's group at the University of Oklahoma as a Visiting Research Associate. In this position, he designed a continuous catalytic reactor for the production of SWNTs, resulting in several issued U.S. patents. During the following two years he scaled up the production of carbon nanotubes gaining experience in several techniques used for the characterization of SWNTs. After optimizing the reaction and pretreatment conditions, he designed and built a fluidized bed reactor for the SWeNT process. He also worked on the further scale up of this process and on the development of different applications for carbon nanotubes such as field emission devices, fuel cells, conductive films and polymer composites. Leandro Balzano received a B.S. degree in Chemical Engineering from the University of Buenos Aires (Argentina) in 1999, a M.S. degree in Chemical Engineering and Materials Science in 2002, and a PhD from the University of Oklahoma in 2004. Leandro also served as the Principal Investigator in several Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) awards including a phase II award, from the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA). He is currently working for Shell in New Orleans, LA.

 

Olga Matarredona

Olga Matarredona is a Chemical Engineer in the field of Physical Chemistry of Surfaces and Surface Science. She got her B.S. degree in 1999 from the Complutense University of Madrid (Spain). After graduation she joined Exxon Chemical Iberia (Spain) where she developed a market analysis for the implementation of organic solvents in different chemical processes. In August of 2000 she joined the Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Oklahoma, where she worked for two years in the area of surfactants and thin film technology, in a project with tight collaboration with the US Air Force. In August of 2002 she joined SWeNT. Her work was focused on the development of SWNT-based electrodes and electrocatalysts for fuel cells. She is currently working for Shell in New Orleans, LA.

 

Olga L. Rueda

Olga Lucia Rueda received her B.S. in 2002 from the School of Chemical Engineering at the Universidad Industrial de Santander (UIS) in Bucaramanga, Colombia. During her undergraduate studies she received an internship at the Colombian Petroleum Institute ICP, ECOPETROL, and worked on the synthesis of surfactant agents for thermic refinery processes. In 2002 she came to the University of Oklahoma as an exchange student and worked at the Institute of Applied Surfactants. Her research was focused on the removal of phenolic compounds from wastewater generated by the pulp and paper industry. She joined Dr. Resasco's group in the summer of 2002, where she worked on synthesis of SWNT-based composites.

 

Nataphan (Mai) Sakulchaicharoen

Nataphan Sakulchaicharoen got her B.S. degree in Chemical Engineering in 1998 from Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok, Thailand. After graduation she joined the graduate program in the Petroleum and Petrochemical College from the same university. Her graduate work was focused on carbon dioxide reforming of methane over platinum zirconia catalysts doped with cerium. In 2002 she got her M.S. degree and took a position as quality control supervisor on a transnational surfactant producer company in Thailand. After a year she joined the graduate program at the University of Oklahoma to work on a PhD under the supervision of Dr. Resasco, which she completed in March 2006.

 

Jose E. Herrera

Jose E. Herrera got his B.S. degree in Chemistry in 1988 from the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú. Before graduation he participated in a six-month research project on the preparation and promotion of Raney nickel catalysts. By the end of 1997 he graduated Summa Cum Laude and accepted a job as an analytical chemist in an environmental regulation agency for the Peruvian government, where he worked on the development and assessment of analytical methods for testing volatile organic compounds and pesticides in potable water. A year later he came to Oklahoma on a Fulbright scholarship to work on his PhD in Chemical Engineering under the supervision of Dr. Resasco. His research was focused on the mechanism of SWNT growth over solid catalysts. He received his PhD degree in August of 2003 and inmediately joined Dr. Resasco's group as a research associate until March of 2004. Later, he worked as a postdoctoral fellow at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In 2006 he left PNNL to join the Chemical Engineering Department at the University of Western Ontario in Canada where he is currently an assistant professor.

 

Liang Zhang

Liang Zhang received his B.S. in 1998 from the School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering at the China Textile University in Shanghai, China. After graduation he joined the graduate program at Dong Hua University, where he worked on the chemical modification of wool to enhance wool's function and reduce the presence of volatile halo-organics in the effluents of the wool industry. He got his M.S. degree in 2001 and accepted a position in a specialty chemical company as a R&D engineer. His work was focused on the synthesis and formulation of silicon-containing materials. In 2002 he joined the PhD program at the School of Chemical Engineering at the University of Oklahoma under the supervision of Dr. Resasco. His research involved the controlled production of SWNT in terms of diameter, chirality, bundle size, and length on the support of porous materials, growth of vertically-oriented SWNT or random network on flat surface with whole coverage or pattern, and applications of SWNT( field emission and transparent electrodes).

 

Colaborators

Maria P. Ruiz

Maria P. Ruiz received her B.S. in Chemical Engineering in 2004 at the University of Zaragoza, Spain. After graduation she joined the graduate program at the same University, and worked on the formation, characterization, and reactivity of soot produced from hydrocarbon pyrolysis. She obtained her PhD in 2008 and accepted a position at the University of Oklahoma as a research associate. Her work is focused on the synthesis of carbon nanotubes and the study of the micropyrolysis index (MPI) of different hydrocarbons. She loves traveling and getting to know new places. Some of her favorite places are New York, Canada, Croatia, and Prague. She returned to Spain in November of 2011 and currently works in Seville.

 

 

 

Min Shen

Min Shen obtained his B.S. in Fine Chemistry in 1999 and his M.S. in Applied Chemistry in 2002 both from the Department of Chemical Engineering at Shangai Jiao Tong University. In 2007, he got his PhD from the Department of Chemistry at the University of California, Riverside. With his wide experience in catalysis and surface chemistry he worked with Dr. Resasco´s group from 2008-2010 as a research associate in heterogenous catalysis and SWNT synthesis. His work was focused on the synthesis of SWNTs on Fe-Mo/MgO catalysts and the study of SWNT/silica hybrids to prepare a novel emulsion system. This emulsion system has been promising in applications for enhanced oil recovery, biofuel refining, and novel-structure material synthesis. Min Shen also colaborated in several projects of the Nanotube research group and he is responsible for the maintenance of our UHV XPS system.

 

 

Walter E. Alvarez

Dr. Walter E. Alvarez worked as a Research Associate at the School of Chemical Engineering at the University of Oklahoma. He is currently a Research Engineer at Phillips Petroleum Co. Dr. Alvarez received his PhD in Materials Science in 1994 from the School of Engineering at the Universidad de Mar del Plata and his B.S. in Chemistry in 1989 from the School of Exact and Natural Sciences at the Universidad de Mar del Plata, Argentina. He was appointed Assistant Professor (1997-98) in the School of Exact and Natural Sciences, and Lecturer (1989-98) in the School of Engineering, both at the Universidad de Mar del Plata. He also served as the Principal Argentinean Investigator (1996-99) during the Cooperation Agreement between the Institute for Gas Utilization and Processing Technologies from the University of Oklahoma and the School of Engineering at the Universidad de Mar del Plata.

 

Francisco Pompeo

Francisco Pompeo came to the University of Oklahoma as a visiting research assistant in 2000. He received his B.S. in Chemistry from the Universidad de Mar del Plata, Argentina. He spent his last two years in college working as a teaching assistant for a junior Physical Chemistry course and as instructor of General Chemistry for first year college students. A year before graduation he was awarded a scholarship from the Spanish government (AECI) to work in the Chemistry Department at the Universidad de Castilla La Mancha, Spain. His research was focused on the synthesis and characterization of homogeneous catalysts based on organometallic compounds of Niobium (V) with cyclopentadienyl and imido ligands. He received a PhD from the Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Argentina, where he is currently working as a researcher.

 

Zhongrui Li

Dr. Zhongrui Li received his PhD in Chemical Physics from the University of Science and Technology of China in 2000. After graduation he participated in a research project focused on magnetism studies using polarized synchrotron radiation at the Free University of Berlin (2001). In 2002 he joined the University of Georgia as a postdoctoral fellow. There, he studied structure-function relationships in metalloenzymes active sites using X-Ray absorption techniques. His main research interest lays on the application of X-Ray based spectroscopies in the study of electronic and local structure of catalysts, magnetic systems and biomaterials.In Dr. Resasco's group he operated and maintained the XPS and XRD systems.

 

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What's new?

Role of water on the surface-guided growth of horizontally aligned
single-walled carbon nanotubes on quartz

The role of water in carbon feed on the surface-guided growth of horizontally aligned single-walled carbon
nanotubes (HA-SWCNTs) was investigated. It is shown that the amount of water can be optimized to favor HA-SWCNT growth, which is proposed to be due to selective etching of carbon deposits at carbon–metal interface. Without water, nanotube–nanotube interaction and carbon accumulation at the interface are disproportionately large compared to the rate of nanotube growth, leading to catalyst deactivation. With excess water, suppression of nanotube growth occurs, resulting in reduced carbon yield on the surface.
Intermediate carbon/water feed ratios achieve cleaner growth with high efficiency.

[Read more]