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Expository Writing Faculty

Catherine Mintler
Interim Director
LGBTQ Ally
Pat Tillman Scholarship Committee
GreenZone
Expo Courses: American Gangster; What Is Work?; Seeing Is Believing
Office: Bizzell Library, Room 4
Email: crmintler@ou.edu

Catherine Mintler joined the Expository Writing Program in 2008, after completing a PhD in English and a Gender and Women’s Studies at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Dr. Mintler’s current book project is a study of the influence of modernist aesthetics, sartorial modernism in particular, upon constructions of identity in nineteenth- and twentieth-century literature. A related, secondary project explores the evolution of a post-war wounded flâneur. Dr. Mintler is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship, an Annette Kolodny Award, a Smith Reynolds Founders Fellowship from the Ernest Hemingway Foundation and Society, the University of Illinois at Chicago’s Gender and Women’s Studies Prize, a Regent’s Fellowship from the University of Nevada, Reno, and OU’s Presidential International Travel Fellowship. She has published her work in the Rocky Mountain Review, The Journal of International Women’s Studies, The F. Scott Fitzgerald Review, and the collection Teaching Hemingway and Gender.   Dr. Mintler is currently developing a course on walking, "Peripatetic Worlds:  From Pilgrimage to Psychogeography."  She co-teaches for the NEH-funded Warrior Scholar project at OU in the summers with Dr. Nick LoLordo.

 

Eric Bosse

Lecturer

Expo Courses: Religious Satire; Political Satire; Transcending Gender; The Writing Life
; Truth to Power
Office: 
736 Elm Ave.
Email: ericbosse@ou.edu



Eric Bosse received an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Montana. He writes fiction and creative nonfiction, in addition to his academic work. He also blogs and makes short movies and videos. He has published more than forty short stories in such magazines and journals as The Sun, Mississippi Review, Exquisite Corpse, Zoetrope, Eclectica, Night Train, The Collagist, and Wigleaf. His story collection, Magnificent Mistakes, was released in 2011 by Ravenna Press.

 

Timothy Bradford
Lecturer
Expo Course:  African American Music and Literature: From Spirituals to Hip Hop
Office: Bizzell Library, Room 4
Email: TBA

Timothy Bradford holds a BA in Human Biology from Stanford University and a PhD in English from Oklahoma State University. He is the author of the poetry collection Nomads with Samsonite and the introduction to Sadhus, a photography book on the ascetics of South Asia. Recent work has appeared in World Literature Today, Poetry Bay, ATTN:, Halvard Johnson’s Truck, Atticus Review/Boo’s Hollow, Art Focus Oklahoma, This Land, The Oklahoma Review, and Upstairs at Duroc. He received the Koret Foundation’s Young Writer on Jewish Themes Award for a novel-in-progress and has been a writer-in-residence at Stanford, a guest researcher at the Institute of Contemporary History in Paris, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Tulsa, and a visiting assistant professor at Oklahoma State University. In 2014, he cofounded Short Order Poems and started organizing and teaching with the Ralph Ellison Creative Writing Workshops. In addition to teaching in the Expository Writing Program, he is a faculty mentor with the Red Earth MFA Creative Writing Program at Oklahoma City University.

 

Margaret Gaida
Visiting Lecturer in the History of Gender, Race, and Science in the Premodern World
Expo Courses: Islam and the West, Love and Sex in the Middle Ages
Office: 736 Elm Ave.
Email: margaret.gaida@ou.edu

Margaret Gaida completed a BA in physics and philosophy at Duke University, an MA in philosophy at the University of California at San Diego, and an MA and PhD in History of Science, Technology, and Medicine here at OU. Her research focuses on the transmission, appropriation, and circulation of scientific knowledge across cultural boundaries in the Mediterranean during the Medieval and Early Modern periods. Margaret received the Lily Auchincloss Pre-Doctoral Rome Prize in April 2014, which supported her research during 2014-2015 at the American Academy in Rome; and, she was named a 2014 Mediterranean Regional Research Fellow by the Council of American Overseas Research Centers (CAORC), which funded a research trip to Istanbul, Turkey, in fall 2015. Shereceived a Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowship in support of her final year of dissertation work.  Margaret is also interested in the history of women in science and biographies of women scientists, and she completed a graduate certificate in Women's and Gender Studies at OU. Margaret blogs about these interests at https://mghsci.wordpress.com/.  In her (limited) spare time, Margaret loves spending time with her family, travelling, being in nature, and olive oil. 

 

Al Harahap
Visiting Lecturer in Critical Theory and Cultural Studies
Office: Bizzell Library, Room 4
Email:

Al Harahap earned his PhD in Rhetoric, Composition, and the Teaching of English at the University of Arizona. His research uses critical theory and cultural studies to conduct institutional analyses and critiques of various sites such as governments, justice systems, healthcare, immigration, marriage, media, and of course the academic institution, among others. His teaching is thus informed by these sites and methods. He is active in national organizations and has served on the boards of CWPA (Council of Writing Program Administration) and AWAC (Association of Writing Across the Curriculum). He likes food and cinema of all kinds and going home to excited doggos.

 

Liz Locke
Lecturer
Expo Courses: Myth and Hero
Office: Bizzell Library, Room 4
Email: lizlocke@ou.edu

Liz Locke holds a Ph.D. in Folklore from Indiana University. She has taught undergraduate courses in American Folklore, cosmology, analytical psychology, and philosophy at Indiana University (Bloomington and Columbus) and Indiana State University (Terre Haute), directed the graduate and undergraduate Interdisciplinary Studies Programs at Naropa University (Boulder), and taught courses in Anthropology and Religious Studies at the University of Oklahoma (Norman). She co-edited (with Theresa A. Vaughan and Pauline Greenhill) The Encyclopedia of Women’s Folklore and Folklife published by Greenwood Press in 2009. Her ongoing research interests include feminist classical studies; race, class, and gender theory; film and advertising semiotics; and the persistence of myth in American political and popular culture.


V. Nicholas LoLordo
Lecturer
Writing Enriched Curriculum Coordinator
Expo Courses: Keepin' It Real; The Rhetoric of Authenticity; Poets 2 Rockstars: The Creative Artist From Fame to Celebrity; American Genius: the Case of Gertrude Stein
Office: 736 Elm Ave.
Email: vnlolordo@ou.edu

V. Nicholas LoLordo holds a PhD. in English and American Literature from Harvard University. Before arriving at OU, he taught at Colorado State University and the University of Nevada-Las Vegas. His primary research area is modern and contemporary English-language poetry and poetics; he has published articles in Arizona Quarterly, Contemporary Literature, the Wallace Stevens Journal and Postmodern Culture. His Expo course "American Genius: the Case of Gertrude Stein" was a Presidential Dream Course in the fall 2014 semester.

 

David Long
Lecturer
Expo Courses: Immigrant America, Modern Monsters, Alcohol in America
Office: 736 Elm Ave.
Email: dl@ou.edu

 

Ebony C. Pope
Expo Course:  Education, Race and Power 
Office: Bizzell Library, Room 4
Email:  ebonypope@ou.edu

Ebony C. Pope received a BA in African & African American Studies and Sociology/Criminology, as well as a Masters of Human Relations at the University of Oklahoma.  She is currently completing her PhD in Educational Leadership and Policy Studies.  Her research focuses on race, gender, and class justice and equity in a multitude of educational arenas.  This includes decolonizing educational practices by resisting the “given” and engaging culturally appropriate epistemologies, curricula, and pedagogies.

 

Robert Scafe
Lecturer
Director, Writing Enriched Curriculum
Expo Courses: Violence and the Sacred; Music, Sound, and Noise; Popular Science
Office: Bizzell Library, Room 4
Email: rscafe@ou.edu

Robert Scafe received his doctorate in history from Stanford University in 2006. He enjoys investigating our most taken-for-granted categories of social analysis—“the economy,” “population,” and “society” itself—by asking when and how these terms came into being. He pursues this line of inquiry by studying French King Louis XIV’s efforts to gather information about his subjects and the resistance of political and religious groups to these new statistical inquiries. Painfully aware that this topic might seem obscure to first-year students, Robert taught his first Expos course—“Violence and the Sacred”—on the history of sacred violence from Cain and Abel through the persecution of Jews in the Middle Ages and up to the terrorist attacks on 9/11. More recently, he has taught “Music, Sound, and Noise,” an exploration of sound studies and musical dissonance which was designated a Presidential Dream Course in 2013. In addition to offering these Expository Writing courses, Robert currently serves as the Writing Coordinator for the U.S. History Survey at O.U.

 

Anna K. Treviño
Expo Course:  Space Invaders: Filling the Non-Existent Void
Office: Wagner Hall, room 280
Email: aktrevi@ou.edu

Anna Kristine Treviño earned her BA in Psychology and her MA in English at Texas A&M University-Kingsville, where she previously taught First-Year Composition and First-Year Seminar courses. Currently, she is pursuing a PhD. in Composition, Rhetoric, and Literacy in the English Department at the University of Oklahoma. Her primary research interest is the intersection of the politics of education and identity, and focuses on the dynamic relationships between identity, the teaching of writing, and space. This also includes writing center work and the First-Year Experience.