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We periodically report articles of interest to our readers, but do not necessarily endorse the views of other websites or publications in which those articles also appear.

May 1, 2018

Oklahoma Center for Nonprofits Teaches the Virtues

OKC Center for Nonprofits teaches the virtues

We have been working with one of our community organization partners, the Oklahoma Center for Nonprofits, to help integrate our nine virtues into their programing for non-profit leaders.

The picture above is from the first of eighteen sessions in a new leadership and professional development program for the Muskogee Creek Nation. The program uses our nine virtues as a framework for the course, with the three main course components focusing on the Intellectual Virtues, the Executive Virtues and the Civic Virtues.

Learn more about the Oklahoma Center for Nonprofits

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April 19, 2018

Open Mindedness - Irving Middle School's Virtue of the Month

Irving Middle School Compassion Video

The most recent virtue video from Irving Middle School students is now available! The school's virtue of the month is open mindedness. Click above to watch Irving students explore this virtue.

Learn more about open mindedness

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April 16, 2018

Theorist Stephanie Pincetl Holds Panel Discussing Urban Metabolism

flyer

Stephanie Pincetl seeks to explain how social, political, and economic contexts affect the physical flow through the “urban metabolism,” an analogy scholars make between cities and living systems.

The panel is co-hosted with Gibbs College of Architecture and will take place on Thursday, April 19 at 4PM in the Buskuhl Gallery in Gould Hall.

Archived Version

 

April 9, 2018

Institute Director Featured in Podcast

Podcast

Institute Director Dr. Nancy Snow is featured on the third episode of the podcast Sacred & Profane Love, hosted by Dr. Jennifer A. Frey. Dr. Frey is assistant professor of philosophy at the University of South Carolina and co-Project Investigator on a 3-year research project, titled “Virtue, Happiness, and the Meaning of Life,” which supports the podcast.  

In this podcast episode, Snow and Frey discuss Whitman’s works, “Song of Myself” and “Democratic Vistas,” and the importance of reading the poetry of Walt Whitman in today’s political climate.

Archived Version

March 30, 2018

Professor Linda Zagzebski Gives Soochow University Lectures in Philosophy

Linda Zagzebski

Institute Leadership Team member and Professor of Philosophy, Dr. Linda Zagzebski, recently gave the Soochow University Lectures in Philosophy in Taiwan. The Lectures are given annually at Soochow University by leading international figures in contemporary analytic philosophy.  

Dr. Zagzebski delivered three lectures under the general title, "The Two Greatest Ideas." The lectures were individually titled: "Two Ideas that Made Us Human" (delivered March 19th), "Persons and Selves" (delivered March 20), and "The Boundary of the Human Mind" (delivered March 21).

The lectures will be revised and expanded into a book to be published by Princeton University Press.

Archived Version

March 9, 2018

Dr. Casey Shutt Publishes Article on Modern Education and Classical Schooling

Casey Shutt

Dr. Casey Shutt is a member of the Institute's Partner Parents Advisory Board and Assistant Headmaster at The Academy of Classical Christian Studies in Oklahoma City, one of the Institute's partner schools. He recently published an article titled, "Of Pigs and Pupils: Fast Food, Modern Education, and the Growth of Classical (Christian) Schools." An excerpt is provided below.

"Sarah Eeckhoff Zylstra recently wrote of the exponential growth of the classical Christian school movement. Similarly, John J. Miller, writing for National Review, calls the classical and classical Christian school movements “a small revolution in K-12 education.” What accounts for the growing popularity of these classical and classical Christian schools? Why are so many families opting for a return to an older way of educating their children? Strange as it may seem, I believe a popular Chipotle video helps explain the reasons for the rapid spread of these schools.

"The video opens with a peaceful, pastoral scene of a young farming family lovingly caring for their livestock while Willie Nelson sings Coldplay’s “The Scientist.” As the camera pans, efficiency supplants care, and the scene grows cold and gray. Countless pigs are mechanically transported along conveyor belts, injected with hormones, compacted, and speedily packed on trucks for dispersion. A factory replaces the farm; concrete and metal have replaced the hills, trees, and wood; machines replace humans." Read more

Archived Version

March 8, 2018

Oklahoma Center for Nonprofits will Host Event on Increasing People of Color Leading Nonprofit Organizations

Oklahoma Center for Nonprofits

On April 26, our community organization partner, Oklahoma Center for Nonprofits, will host Sean Thomas-Breitfeld, co-author of the Race to Lead report. He will speak on the results of a national survey administered by the Building Movement Project on how nonprofit organizations can increase the number of people of color leading nonprofit organizations, and how the sector can change the narrative about the problem and develop new strategies to address the racial leadership gap.

The Building Movement Project works to help the nonprofit sector align social justice principles with their operating practices. Mr. Thomas-Breitfeld’s presentation is part of the Oklahoma Center for Nonprofits’ “National Speakers’ Series.”
 
All OU students are welcome to attend this event free of charge. A second session will be held in Tulsa the same day, and OU-Tulsa students are welcome to attend that event free of charge. Event and registration details are included below.
 
Oklahoma City, April 26, 8:30 – 10:30am
Location: TBA
Register here
 
Tulsa, April 26th from 1:30 – 3:30pm
Location: TBA
Register here
 
OU Students registering for these events should click “invoice me,” and then indicate they are a student at OU in the “accommodations” box when checking out. No invoice will be sent for their free enrollment.

Archived Version

February 23, 2018

Curiosity Fest Call for Programs

Curiosity Fest Call for Programs

Curiosity Fest 2018 is the inaugural year for Oklahoma Humanities’ annual event. It is designed to bring the scholarship of the humanities to the adult general public in interactive and vibrant formats. The festival will be Saturday, October 20 at the Civic Center Music Hall in downtown Oklahoma City. The public will be invited to attend concurrent programs throughout the day and in the evening attend a presentation by the featured speaker, Jad Abumrad, founder of NPR’s Radiolab. 

 

 

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February 7, 2018

Compassion - Irving Middle School's Virtue of the Month

Irving Middle School Compassion Video

The most recent virtue video from Irving Middle School students is now available! The school's virtue of the month is compassion. Click above to watch Irving students explore this virtue.

Learn more about compassion

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February 5, 2018

Job Opening at the Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues

Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues

Our partner organization, the Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues, is seeking to hire a senior researcher in psychology, education or philosophy (at the level of Associate Professor) to join their Management Team. Applications from outside the United Kingdom are welcome.

Further details are available here.

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January 29, 2018

Institute Director Publishes Chapter in Volume on Virtue Education


Institute Director, Dr. Nancy Snow, contributed a chapter to The Theory and Practice of Virtue Educationedited by Tom Harrison and David Ian Walker and published by Routledge.

Publisher's Description: The Theory and Practice of Virtue Education offers the reader a comprehensive and authoritative account of both the theoretical and practical complexities of cultivating virtue in education and beyond. The book moves beyond the usual philosophical literature that merely discusses virtue in the abstract and offers scholarly, research-informed suggestions for practice.

Drawn from a highly successful international conference, the chapters in this volume offer a unique insight into the varieties of approaches that leading scholars have identified for putting the learning and nurturing of virtues into practice. Featured are chapters from internationally acclaimed scholars primarily in the fields of philosophy, psychology and education, which are categorised under three headings: philosophical and theoretical foundations for cultivating virtues; developing virtues in practice; and nurturing specific virtues. Beginning with chapters that examine differing theoretical complexities of virtue education, the book then moves on to explore different approaches to nurturing virtue in the classroom and beyond. This practical approach is further evidenced in the final section, where individual virtues are discussed.

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January 24, 2018

Institute Director Co-Authors Article with Dr. Scott Beck on Teaching Virtue

Teaching Virtue

Institute Director, Dr. Nancy Snow, recently co-authored an article with Dr. Scott Beck, Head Principal of Norman High School. Norman High School was the Institute's first partner school, and Dr. Beck joined our Leadership Team in February 2017.

Their co-authored article is on teaching virtue, and will be published in the Routledge Handbook of Moral Epistemology, edited by Aaron Zimmerman, Karen Jones and Mark Timmons. A penultimate draft of the paper is freely accessible in the Institute's online archive. Read the paper

Abstract: Can virtue be taught? The question is a controversial one, harking back to Confucianism and the Platonic dialogues. We assume that virtue can be taught in the sense that teachers can influence character development in their students and explore the challenges and opportunities of teaching virtue from a variety of perspectives. In part I, Nancy E. Snow surveys a number of theoretical perspectives on teaching virtue which have been or are being implemented in schools. Scott Beck, the principal of Norman High School, describes in part II the grassroots approach to character development recently initiated at his institution. In part III we discuss how features of the Norman High initiative illus-trate aspects of the approaches discussed in part I, and conclude with general observations about roles for askesis, or disciplined practice, in changing school communities and cultivating character. Read the full paper

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January 19, 2018

Perseverance - Irving Middle School's Virtue of the Month

 

Students from our partner institution, Irving Middle School (Norman, OK), are producing a video each month about their featured virtue. January's virtue is perseverance.

Learn more about perseverance

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January 18, 2018

Jubilee Centre Offers New Parent Resources

The Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtue has brought together a collection of resources for parents to assist in developing character in their children. Below is an excerpt from the page.

At the Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtue we have chosen some popular children’s books which reflect some of the virtues included in our Framework for Character Education. For each book we have highlighted one or two virtues which are reflected in the book to act as a starting point for you to discuss virtue and character with your children. Each month we will focus on two different virtues and add more books to the list.

So far, the Centre has selected children's books that exhibit compassion and gratitude. Learn more>

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January 16, 2018

Past Institute Fellow Publishes Article on Intellectual Humility Scale

Finding middle ground between intellectual arrogance and intellectual servility: Development and assessment of the limitations-owning intellectual humility scale

Dr. Megan Haggard was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Institute for the 2016-2017 academic year. She recently co-authored a chapter titled "Finding middle ground between intellectual arrogance and intellectual servility: Development and assessment of the limitations-owning intellectual humility scale" which was published in Personality and Individual Differences.

Abstract: Recent scholarship in intellectual humility (IH) has attempted to provide deeper understanding of the virtue as personality trait and its impact on an individual's thoughts, beliefs, and actions. A limitations-owning perspective of IH focuses on a proper recognition of the impact of intellectual limitations and a motivation to overcome them, placing it as the mean between intellectual arrogance and intellectual servility. We developed the Limitations-Owning Intellectual Humility Scale to assess this conception of IH with related personality constructs.

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