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Executive Virtues

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Executive Virtues

"You have power over your mind—not outside events. Realize this, and you will find strength.”

– Marcus Aurelius

Self-Regulation

Self Regualtion

Self-regulation is one of the most basic virtues, in the sense that some degree of it is necessary for the acquisition of any other virtue. It is the capacity to regulate and restrain one's thoughts, emotions, and behaviors for the sake of achieving good ends. Self-regulation especially includes the ability to regulate the desires, and it includes the ability to direct one's thoughts and attention to one's goals.

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Perseverance

Perseverance

Perseverance is the ability to stay on the path to one's goals despite obstacles, the discouragement of failure, and the distracting effect of temptations. It is crucial for the achievement of long-term goals, the pursuit of which presents so many opportunities to veer off-course or abandon one’s aims. The persevering person does not lose sight of her purpose even when it takes a considerable amount of time to reach it, and she does not give up easily.

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Honesty

Honesty

Honesty is not just an executive virtue; it is also a basic intellectual and civic virtue. Most generally, honesty is a deep and pervasive commitment to truth — seeking it out, acknowledging it, holding oneself (and others) accountable to it, and conforming one’s conduct to it. Honesty is closely related to integrity, which is the virtue of being true to oneself, of having one’s beliefs, feelings, and behavior in harmony. A person of integrity does not say one thing and do another, so other people can count on her to do her part in following and upholding the rules of the community. Honesty is therefore also closely connected to respecting others in the community.

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