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Intellectual Virtues

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Intellectual Virtues

"Those who cannot change their minds cannot change anything."

– George Bernard Shaw

Love of Learning

Love of Learning

Love of learning includes both the desire to acquire knowledge and delight in achieving it. It includes curiosity about the world and a proper regard for the difficulty of careful inquiry. (Thus it is connected to intellectual humility). Love of learning leads to a desire to learn the standards of particular fields of study, and a desire to expand the fields of knowledge one has already acquired.

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Intellectual Humility

Intellectual Humility

Humility in general is the virtue of facing up to the truth about oneself--neither overvaluing nor undervaluing one’s abilities and accomplishments. This virtue also involves admitting the limits of one’s epistemic perspective. The intellectually humble person does not deny her accomplishments, but shows a lack of concern about intellectual status, and is sensitive to the ways in which one’s beliefs can go wrong even though they seem right.

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Open-Mindedness

Open-Mindedness

Open-mindedness is the readiness to step outside one’s own point of view to consider the merits of alternative perspectives, with a willingness to change one’s beliefs when that is warranted.  Open-mindedness follows from a genuine love of truth, and the humility to admit that one's own view might be mistaken.

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