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Meteorologist Gary England welcomes you to the National Weather Center! Click on the link below to take a quick tour of our building and learn a bit more about the enterprise housed within our walls.NWC Welcome Video

Research is a hallmark of the National Weather Center. From national research organizations such as the NOAA National Severe Storms Laboratory to academic researchers from multiple disciplines, the National Weather Center remains at the forefront of innovation and critical discovery in the field of meteorology.

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Tours of the National Weather Center are offered to schools, groups and individuals at no cost. Reservations are required and tours fill up quickly so check the tour schedule for availability and more details.

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The National Weather Center Library supports the research and education of all entities in the National Weather Center and the students of the University of Oklahoma. Students, faculty, staff and other members of the National Weather Center have access to numerous databases of information including both OU and NOAA Libraries.

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Multiple organizations within the National Weather Center forecast weather for areas throughout the country, including our location in Norman, Oklahoma. You can get your latest forecast through our current weather page or by clicking below.

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The annual National Weather Festival, held each fall at the National Weather Center, highlights the many weather related organizations and activities in central Oklahoma.  This free, open-house event is filled with fun activities for all ages!

National Weather Festival

GeoCarb is hiring!

geocarb team

Check out this job for a Deputy Program Manager - Job number: 172598

jobs.ou.edu 

OU CIMMS announces new Director

Greg McFarquhar

The University of Oklahoma Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies and School of Meteorology announce the addition of Dr. Greg McFarquhar to their staffs.

McFarquhar will be the Director of OU CIMMS and School of Meteorology Professor starting this fall. Randy Peppler has been interim director after former OU CIMMS director and Meteorology Professor Dr. Peter Lamb passed away in May 2014.

"We look forward to Greg leading CIMMS in innovative ways in order to help address future NOAA research challenges in weather radar and mesoscale meteorology,” Peppler said.

McFarquhar comes from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign as a professor in the Department of Atmospheric Sciences. He has worked at the university since 2001. He has also served as a visiting faculty fellow at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado from 2015 to 2016.

McFarquhar’s PhD and his Masters of Science are in Atmospheric Physics and his Bachelors of Science is in Mathematics and Physics, all from the University of Toronto.

Director of the National Weather Center Dr. Berrien Moore said, “The University of Oklahoma is delighted to have a gifted scientist and extraordinary leader join the OU family as the Director of the Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies. The possibilities are endless!”

McFarquhar has been involved with more than 100 peer-reviewed publications, the principal investigator for more than 100 different grants and involved in more than 20 field campaigns.

“After being involved in many different projects at other universities and research institutes over the past 25 years investigating the impact of clouds on various weather phenomena, I am looking forward to broadening my horizons with even more exciting work over the next several years at CIMMS and The University of Oklahoma,” McFarquhar said. “I am especially impressed with the credentials of the amazing people already working here. I hope that I can strengthen and improve the existing collaborations and partnerships already, as well as finding new avenues for improving the observation, analysis, understanding and prediction of weather elements and systems.”

CIMMS was established in 1978 as a cooperative program that unites the scientific and technical resources of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and OU into a center of research excellence. CIMMS was created to support NOAA’s Mission of Science, Service and Stewardship and thereby contribute to NOAA’s long-term goal of building a Weather-Ready Nation that is prepared for and responds to weather-related events. CIMMS research areas include weather radar, hydrometeorology, observations and numerical modeling of high-impact weather including severe storms, forecast and warning improvements, regional climate variations, the societal and socioeconomic impacts of weather and climate, and related subject areas.

Ryzhkov named AMS Fellow

AMS Fellow Ryzhkov

The University of Oklahoma Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies is proud to announce the American Meteorological Society named an OU CIMMS senior research scientist during a recent release of awards.

Alexander Ryzhkov was one of more than 30 individuals recognized by AMS during a recent announcement of 2018 award winners and fellows. Ryzhkov was awarded the prestigious honor of AMS fellow.

To coninue reading, click here.  

Honoring the memory of Ed Kessler

Ed Kessler

What a huge loss to the weather community. Ed, you are missed and loved! The many following in your footsteps will continue the great work you started here!  Read more

OU AWARDED $166 MILLION GRANT BY NASA FOR FIRST GEOSTATIONARY VEGETATION, ATMOSPHERIC CARBON MISSION

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:  Dec. 6, 2016
 
NORMAN – The University of Oklahoma has been awarded a five-year, $166 million grant by NASA to advance understanding of Earth’s natural exchanges of carbon between the land, atmosphere and ocean.
The primary goals of the Geostationary Carbon Cycle Observatory, led by Berrien Moore, OU Vice President for Weather and Climate Programs, are to monitor plant health and vegetation stress throughout the Americas, and to examine the natural sources and processes that control carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and methane in the atmosphere.
“To say this is an extraordinary achievement by Dr. Berrien Moore and our research team is an understatement,” said OU President David L. Boren. “The grant is one of the most exceptional in the history of the University and is testimony to the outstanding national stature of our research team. I cannot think of a more exciting way to observe the holiday season than with the announcement of this remarkable grant.”
The mission will launch on a commercial communications satellite to make observations over the Americas from an orbit of approximately 22,000 miles above the equator.
The OU-led geoCARB team will build an advanced payload employing otherwise unused launch and spacecraft capacity to advance science and provide societal benefit.
Mission collaborators include the Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center in Palo Alto, California; SES Government Solutions Company in Reston, Virginia; the Colorado State University in Fort Collins; and NASA’s Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, California, Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. Colleagues and laboratories from France, Australia and Mexico also are contributing to the project.
The mission was competitively selected from 15 proposals submitted to the agency’s second Earth Venture - Mission announcement of opportunity for small orbital investigations of the Earth system.
 
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Palmer recognized as fellow for contributions to radar science

palmer

Robert D. Palmer, Ph.D., University of Oklahoma meteorology professor, associate vice president for research and executive director of the Advanced Radar Research Center, has been named an Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineering Fellow. Among a select group of recipients recommended for the prestigious honor, Palmer is being recognized for contributions to atmospheric and meteorological radar science.

"Professor Robert Palmer has brought distinction to the University of Oklahoma in numerous ways: scientifically, academically and through service that reaches a wide array of private and public sector activities. His most recent and great honor of being made a fellow in the institute adds to this record of distinction to OU. We are particularly thrilled since this also brings much deserved distinction to Bob Palmer," said Berrien Moore, vice president for Weather and Climate Programs, director of the National Weather Center and dean of the OU College of Atmospheric and Geographic Sciences.

While at OU, Palmer has been deeply committed to providing students a rigorous education in weather radar. In close collaboration with colleagues in the Norman weather radar community, Palmer led the development of a unique interdisciplinary curriculum in radar meteorology. Soon after joining OU, Palmer established the Advanced Radar Research Center, which is rapidly gaining recognition as one of the world's strongest academic centers in radar meteorology.

In recent years, Palmer has focused on the application of advanced radar signal processing techniques to observations of severe weather, particularly related to phased-array radars and other innovative system designs. He has been published widely in the area of radar remote sensing of the atmosphere, with an emphasis on generalized imaging problems, spatial filter design, and clutter mitigation using advanced array and signal processing techniques.

Palmer, an OU graduate with a doctoral degree in electrical engineering, is actively engaged with his profession through involvement with the American Meteorological Society, the American Geophysical Union and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineering. Internationally, he has been committed to the development of a vibrant exchange program with Kyoto University in Japan, focused on studies of the atmosphere using modeling and advanced remote sensing methods. He has received several awards for his research and teaching activities and is an American Meteorological Society Fellow as well.

The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineering Grade of Fellow is conferred by the Board of Directors upon a person with an outstanding record of accomplishments in any of the fields of interest. The total number selected in any one year cannot exceed one-tenth of one- percent of the total voting membership. Fellow is the highest grade of the institute's membership and is recognized by the technical community as a prestigious honor and an important career achievement.

NSF-supported research at the University of Oklahoma uses supercomputers and simulations to improve storm forecasts

NSF Research

When a hail storm moved through Fort Worth, Texas on May 5, 1995, it battered the highly populated area with hail up to 4 inches in diameter and struck a local outdoor festival known as the Fort Worth Mayfest.

The Mayfest storm was one of the costliest hailstorms in U.S history, causing more than $2 billion in damage and injuring at least 100 people.

Scientists know that storms with a rotating updraft on their southwestern sides -- which are particularly common in the spring on the U.S. southern plains -- are associated with the biggest, most severe tornadoes and also produce a lot of large hail. However, clear ideas on how they form and how to predict these events in advance have proven elusive.

A team based at University of Oklahoma (OU) working on the Severe Hail Analysis, Representation and Prediction (SHARP) project works to solve that mystery, with support from the National Science Foundation (NSF).  Read More

 

In the News!

AMS

Congratulations Lance Leslie and Mike Richman

on your paper co-authored by Hamish A. Ramsay titled Seasonal Tropical Cyclone Predictions Using Optimized Combinations of ENSO Regions: Application to the Coral Sea Basin reaching #1 in J Climate and #3 in all AMS Journals! We are so proud of you!

 

Click here for the link to the paper.

US project looks to develop meteorological-monitoring UAV

Chilson

The Cloud-Map team, which consists of divisions from the universities of Oklahoma, Oklahoma State, Kentucky and Nebraska, is looking to create a tailored system for scientists, incorporating different elements of technology team members have previously developed into a low-cost package.The idea is to replace the role that weather balloons have, but in a mobile way so weather can be followed and tracked to better predict when and where it will develop....

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Dr. Yoshi Sasaki, 1927-2015

Dr. Yoshi Sasaki, Professor Emeritus and a founder in the University of Oklahoma School of Meteorology, passed away on March 12, 2015. 

Dr. Sasaki earned a Ph.D. in Science from Tokyo University in 1955. Born in Akita, Japan in 1927, Dr. Sasaki emigrated to the United States after World War II. He moved to the University of Oklahoma in 1960, and helped start the meteorology program. 

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Dr. Yoshi Sasaki
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Flying Cow Cafe

The Flying Cow Cafe is located on the first floor of the National Weather Center and is open from 7 a.m. - 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. A delicious selection of breakfast and lunch items await you at "the Cow." Come join us during your visit to the National Weather Center!

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Doppler Depot

The Doppler Depot is an online retail shop, with a physical location within the National Weather Center. Whether you are in need of a t-shirt, travel mug or pet tornado, the Doppler Depot has all your National Weather Center items! Find the perfect gift for your weather enthusiast!

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