A. S. Mike Monroney
Photograph Collection
#201-250

Go to Monroney Photos 201-250

201. Administration Building at the Main Base of Andros Island test ranges. Joint US/UK flags flying in token of the agreement between the two nations, whereby US leased Bahamas' Andros Island from the United Kingdom for 20 years with concurrence of Bahamian Government. Andros Island, Bahamas.

202. Range Support Shop. The most modern and sophisticated seaborne test vehicle shop in the world. It includes machine, electronic repair, and test vehicle preparation shops as well as Clean Room Facilities. Andros Island, Bahamas.

203. Map depicting distance from West Palm Beach, Florida to Andros Island. "TOTO (Tongue of the Ocean) is due east of and parallel with Andros Island (Bahamas.) Distance by air 177 nautical miles, between West Palm Beach, Florida, and Andros Island, permits easy access to AUTEC Ranges."

204. Map of Andros Island, Bahamas indicating Sonar range, acoustics range, and weapons range. "Three Test Ranges due east of Andros Island, Ocean depth varies between 3,600 feet at southern tip of Weapons Range and 6,600 feet on northeastern tip of Acoustics Range."

205. Artist's concept of AUTEC's Acoustic Range. Submarine (left) emits sounds which are picked up by hydrophone-equipped tracking and noise measurement arrays (upper left.) Ship noises are transmitted to Command Control (upper right) where an Acoustic Data Processor provides information on direction and distance of submarine, as well as acoustic signature (analysis of noise generated by the submarine.)

206. Artist's concept of AUTEC's Sonar Range in operation. Ship (top left) emits sound waves which are picked up by sonar buoys (transponders) or active targets. These sonar buoys reflect the sound back to its Command Control where a sonar console is located. This is known as FORACS (Fleet Operational Readiness Accuracy Check Sites.) The Sonar Range enables ships to check the accuracy of their means of determining distance and position of underwater objects.

207. Artist's concept of AUTEC's Weapons Range. Submarine (extreme right) firing missile, first picked up by circular Impact Area (right) then by radar and cinetheodolies (Sites 2,3,4,6, and 7,) while airborne. Tracking of missile is provided by seabed hydrophones (left end of Range) as missile speeds toward target. Missile is equipped with an acoustic signal source called a "pinger." Sounds received by hydrophones are relayed through cables and junction boxes (Dolphins) to sites 3 and 4. Microwave towers transmit all information to the computer at Site 1 (left) in the AUTEC Data Processing Center. This form of three-dimensional tracking permits a real time display on a large screen. The purpose of the Weapons Range is the operational evaluation of advanced underwater weapons system components.

208. Drawing of nuclear type submarine fires test torpedo into Weapons Range at TOTO.

209. Drawing of AUTEC-1, 27 feet long, 20 ton, deep sea submersible presently building at Electric Boat Company, Groton, Connecticut, will have a diving capability of 6,000 feet. Three-man crew includes two observers who look through viewing ports and beam spotlights on ocean bed. Pilot manipulates mechanical arm, here shown retracted.

210. Drawing of ocean bed which bears remarkable similarity to the surface topograph to which we are accustomed. Hills, valleys, mountain crags and defiles all are present. Only the vegetation differs, and a wide variety of deep sea fish is in abundance. Oceanbed in many places is rich in valuable mineral ores. Deepest ocean trench known on earth is the Mindanao Trench, off the Philippines, 37,872 feet recorded in 1962. 15% of all sea floor is no deeper than 6,000 feet. Much of the ocean life is in this depth range. 98% of all sea floor lies within a maximum depth of 20,000 feet.

211. Construction of barracks for airmen training as FAA Air Traffic Controllers. Tinker Air Force Base, Okla. City, OK. Jan. 26, 1962.

212. Interior of barracks for airmen training as FAA Air Traffic controllers. Tinker Air Force Base, Okla. City, OK Jan. 26, 1962.

213. Interior of barracks for airmen training as FAA Air Traffic controllers. Tinker Air Force Base, Okla. City, OK Jan 26, 1962.

214. Barracks for airmen training as FAA Air Traffic Controllers. Tinker Air Force Base, Okla. City, OK Jan 26, 1962.

215. View from highway looking south toward the north side of Vance Air Force Base. Gate #2 is in the lefthand corner of the picture; Gate #3 is in the righthand corner. Enid, Okla. 1968. Polaroid print.

216. View from highway looking west along the north side of Vance Air Force Base. A Coors Beer van is leaving Gate #2 and a pickup truck is outside of Gate #3. Enid, Okla. 1968. Polaroid print.

217. View of Gate #3, Vance Air Force Base. A picket (against aircraft noise?) can be seen at the rear of his truck. In the morning and at noon he leaves his truck and pickets. The rest of the time he spends inside his truck reading. The Serv-Air, Inc., Security vehicle is inside of Gate #3, Enid, Okla. 1968.

218. Main Gate, looking west toward Gates #2 and #3, Vance Air Force Base. In the far distance a large oil tanker truck has pulled out of Gate #2. Enid, Okla. 1968.

219. Main Gate, Vance Air Force Base. Sign similar to that at Main Gate have been posted all three gates: "All personnel of Kinlaw Contracting Co. and its suppliers will use Gate 3." Okla. 1968.

220. Montage of newspaper clippings concerning plane crashes, aircraft safety. c. 1961, 1962.

221. Aircraft Safety Demonstration. A Boeing 720 jetliner racing down a runway at 130 knots was gently halted in less than one fourth the stopping distance normally required by the big jets. It was using a tail hook and an arresting system designed by All American Engineering Company of Wilmington, Delaware, as part of the Federal Aviation Agency's program to avoid accidents caused by overshot landings and aborted take-offs. In the top picture the pilot has lowered the tail hook as he nears a steel cable placed across the runway. In the lower picture the hook engages the cable which is attached to loose fitting pistons in water filled tubes buried alongside the runway. The force of the water resisting the pistons as they are pulled through the tubes gently halts the plane before it runs off the runway. The system was demonstrated for Press and Industry officials last week at the FAA's National Aviation Facility Experimental Center (NAFEC) near Atlantic City, New Jersey. December, 1962.

222. Aircraft safety demonstration. Men inspect landing gear of a Boeing 720 jetliner. View of runway. The system was demonstrated for Press and Industry officials last week at the FAA's National Aviation Facility Experimental Center (NAFEC) near Atlantic City, New Jersey. December, 1962. All American Engineering Co., Wilmington, Delaware.

223. Bruce R. Sheaffer squatting under an aircraft. The tail hook is shown in its "up" position against the underside of an FAA Boeing 720. Because of its natural curved form, the tail hook springs to the "down" position when released by the pilot and hugs the runway surface until engaging a steel cable placed across the runway. The cable is part of the Model 3500 Water Squeezer Arresting Gear installed alongside the runway. Sheaffer is the engineer who designed the spring tail hook. NAFEC, near Atlantic City, New Jersey December 1962. All American Engineering Co., Wilmington,, Delaware.

224. A spring steel tail hook mounted under a Federal Aviation Agency Boeing 720 and 1-1/2 inch diameter steel cable are shown after an arrestment. The end of the cable is attached to loose fitting pistons which are drawn through water filled pipes buried alongside the runway. Action of the water resisting the moving pistons stops the aircraft gently in less than 2,000 feet. The disc or "do-nuts" shown around the cable are used to support it above the runway prior to hook engagement. NAFEC, near Atlantic City, New Jersey. December, 1962. All American Engineering Co., Wilmington, Delaware.

225. Artist concept shows how the Model 3500 "Water Squeezer" Arresting Gear stops the large jetliners. The hook on the airplane engages the wire cable and pulls cable attached to loose fitting pistons through water filled tubes buried alongside the runway. The resistance of the water against the face of the loose fitting pistons slows the jetliner in about one quarter of the distance normally required to stop a speeding jetliner. The faking box rope shown is used to retrieve the piston from within the tube after the plane has been arrested. Passengers riding in the aircraft during tests reported nothing unusual about the sensation of being "arresting." Forces on passengers are equal to or less than the force which occurs during stopping procedures now in use. December, 1962. All American Engineering Co.

226. Three men in front of an aircraft. Dwight Bennett, left, Aero Commander Vice President-Assistant to the General Manager, is presented with the Type and Airworthiness Certificate for the first production model Grand Commander by Dale A. Miller, center, Supervisory Inspector, Engineering and Manufacturing, FAA. Aero's Reliability Manager, Blair Gore, looks on. 1963.

227. Jet Commander 1121 taking off from runway. (DC-3 experimental replacement.) Airport and U.S. Naval Reserve Training hanger in background. 1963.

228. Jet Commander 1121 taking off from runway. (DC-3 replacement, experimental.) 1963.

229. Jet Commander 1121 in flight. (DC-3 replacement, experimental.) View of patterned landscape. 1963.

230. Jet Commander 1121 resting on runway. (DC-3 replacement, experimental.) 1963.

231. Drawing of Jet Commander 1121, hydraulic equipment, indicating parts. (DC-3 replacement, experimental.) 1963.

232-234. Drawing of Jet Commander 1121 Flight Control Systems, indicating parts. (DC-3 replacement, experimental.) 1963.

235. Drawing of Jet Commander 1121 navigation and communication equipment, showing parts. (DC-3 replacement, experimental.) 1963.

236. Aircraft in flight. Patterned landscape in background. Made by Rockwell. The distinctive airscoop of the top of the Pressurized Grand Commander fuselage is the only outward feature to identify the pressurized model of the Grand Commander. With pressurization the Grand Commander is priced at $199,950. The standard Grand Commander has all the new features of the Pressurized Grand Commander plus a step-up in payload and the price remains unchanged at $146,900. 1964.

237. Interior of Rockwell aircraft. Both models of the new Grand Commander series now offer two locations for the lavatory. Located on the right side of the passenger cabin, either forward or aft, it may be used as a passenger seat during landing and take-off. 1964.

238. Interior of Rockwell aircraft. More than 20 different cabin arrangements are available in the new Grand Commander series. Here you see the self-storing table in use. Between the aft chairs is a new console. Indirect lighting has been added and individual reading lights and air vents are provided for each chair. 1964.

239. A couple demonstrating the comfort of Rockwell's Grand Commander airplane interior. 1964.

240. Loading baggage on airplane at night. Pan American Airways new Boeing 707-321C all-cargo Jet Clipper can be loaded in one hour, thanks to AirPake, the Airline's palletized preloading system. Here a train of 13 pallets is positioned at the aircraft for fast loading. 1963. Pan American photo.

241. Night view of aircraft, showing two men in baggage compartment. Superimposed chart illustrates how air freight has climbed for Pan American in the decade preceding inauguration of the first jet freighters. In 1952 Pan American recorded 51,617,000 ton miles. This figure was up to 195,000,000 ton miles for 1962 and is projected to 225,000,000 ton miles for 1963. Pan American Photo.

242. Pan American Airway's Boeing 707-312C cargo jet, the world's largest jet transport. Each is capable of carrying 40 tons of cargo nonstop across the Atlantic. Two men in baggage compartment. 1963. Pan American Photo.

243. A pallet of cargo is raised toward the cargo door of a Pan American all-cargo clipper by a scissors lift. The cargo door is the largest of any commercial aircraft and opens to a full 90 degrees. 1963. Pan American Photo.

244. Interior of freight compartment. Cargo handlers maneuver a pallet of freight into Pan American Airways new all-cargo Clipper while another team directs a second pallet of cargo into the aircraft. 1963. Pan American Photo.

245. Sketch of troops boarding Pan Am jet. In times of emergency, Pan American Airways new jet freighters would have vital military missions. This artist's sketch shows how a single aircraft could transport 109 troops and 5 pallets of cargo, a total of 30 tons of freight. 1963. Pan American Photo.

246. System World map showing flight routes of Braniff International Airlines. From Braniff Press Pack. April, 1965.

247. Braniff International Airlines advertisement with picture of airplane. From Braniff Press Pack, April, 1965.

248. Braniff International Airlines advertisement with picture of airplane interior showing clock. From Braniff Press Pack, April, 1965.

249. Braniff International Airlines advertisement with picture of man waiting, airplane in background. From Braniff Press Pack, April, 1965.

250. Harding L. Lawrence, President, Braniff International Airlines. Tail of airplane in background. From Braniff Press Pack, April, 1965.

Go to Monroney Photos 251-300
A. S. Mike Monroney Collection Description
A. S. Mike Monroney Photo Collection Description
Carl Albert Center Photo Inventories


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