A. S. Mike Monroney
Photograph Collection
#251-300

Go to Monroney Photos 201-250

251. Map of United States showing flight routes between cities. "Cities which will be directly linked to Hawaii and Japan under a plan proposed by American Airlines." 1966.

252. Map of United States, Japan, and Hawaii. Forty-four cities in the nations major markets will get direct service over one airline to Tokyo and Hawaii under a plan proposed to the Civil Aeronautics Board by American Airlines, speeding trade and travel between the United States and its largest customer, Japan. 1966.

253. Five people boarding a Lear-Siegler jet. Wichita air control tower in background. Wichita, Kansas. 1963.

254. Lear-Siegler jet in flight. 1963.

255. Aerial view of Lear jet aero spaceway and building (64 acres) 1963. George Beard, Wichita, Kansas

256. U.S. Navy jet in flight. North American Aviation, T-2B, a twin engine, tandem cockpit airplane. 1963. Color print.

257. Airplanes under construction in hanger. The second Jet Commander fuselage and the pressurization test fuselage. On the right is the one-piece wing that will also serve as the fuel tank for the Jet Commander. December, 1963.

258. The Jet Commander pressurization fuselage, seen from the rear, is in the final stages of construction before going into the test tank. December, 1963.

259. D.J. Long, Aero Commander's Chief Engineer, explains some of the reasons Aero Commander elected to certify the Jet Commander under 4b regulations. Dec. 1963.

260. Aircraft in flight. A test boom has been attached to the nose of the Jet Commander to calibrate yaw, airspeed and pitch. This is the first in-flight official photo of the Jet Commander since the addition of thirty inches to the fuselage. Dec. 1963.

261. Aircraft under construction in hanger. Four major mock-ups of the C-141 StarLifter are shown in this photo. They are the complete fuselage mock-up (rear,) nose section (left,) mock-up of palletized loading (center,) and mock-up of the vertical and horizontal stabilizer inner sections (right.) These mock-ups have been reviewed by the F.A.A., the Air Force and other military services, and the civil aviation officials. Georgia, 1962. Lockheed-Georgia Company.

262. Four views of Aero Spacelines airplane model. 1963.

263. Aero Spacelines aircraft in flight over a city. Largest airplane in the world. 1963.

264. Flight crew with Aero Spacelines the "Super Guppy," world's largest aircraft, on the initial flight Tuesday, Aug. 31, were (left to right) Jack Pedesky, pilot; Ercel O. Oliver, systems engineer; P.G. Smith, co-pilot; and Galen G. Hull, flight engineer, California (?) 1963. Furman Associates.

265. The "Super Guppy" largest aircraft in the world on runway. It has an inside diameter of 25 ft. and a total length of 141 ft. and 3 in. A new 15 ft. center wing section gives the aircraft a total wing span of 156 ft. 3 inc. Tail height is 46 ft. 5 in., or almost five stories above the ground, and cubic displacement of fuselage is 49, 790 cu. ft.--approximately five times that of today's jet transports. California (?) 1963. Furman Associates.

266. The "Super Guppy" largest aircraft in the world under construction, is the first to have the entire nose section including the cockpit swing open 120 degrees. Control cables are locked fore and aft of the separation point and disconnected when the nose is swung open. Six 1.25 in. bolts plus three 1.75 in. automatic latching devices secure the two sections. California (?) 1963. Furman Associates.

267. Drawing of space capsule being loaded into an Aero Spacelines "Super Guppy," world's largest aircraft. 1965. Douglas Ettridge, artist.

268. Drawing of a space capsule being loaded into an Aero Spacelines "Super Guppy," world's largest aircraft. 1963.

269-270. Sketch of Aero Spacelines "Super Guppy," with table of specifications. April 5, 1965. R. Argo, artist.

271. Man standing in front of piloted small jet. Aero spacelines "Super Guppy" under construction in background. c. 1963.

272. Group of men on airport runway. NASA aircraft in background. c. 1963.

273. Group of men being briefed inside Aero Spacelines "Super Guppy" under construction. c. 1963.

274. Two men in front of Aero Spacelines "Super Guppy" under construction. c. 1963.

275-278. Aero Spacelines "Super Guppy" under construction. c. 1963.

279. Airport control tower under construction, using Robberson Steel of Okla. City.

280. Aircraft parts exhibit. Structural Electric Products Company of Windsor Lock, Connecticut. June 3, 1963.

281. Electrical part for aircraft made by Structural Electric Products Company of Windsor Locks, Connecticut. June, 1963.

282. Aircraft air speed indicator.

283. Dirigible model in flight (simulated.) Boston University nuclear airship design project. Boston, Massachusetts.

284. Convair RB-36E Intercontinental Bomber. The B-36 was our nation's major deterrent to aggression in the late 1940's and early 1950's. The airplane on display at the Air Force Museum, W-P AFB, Ohio, is the second of 380 B-36's built. Ohio. Joseph F. Morsello Color print. Postcard.

285. Spacecraft fairings, which will protect NASA's Gemini docking adapter during launch into space, are shown during separation test at the Douglas Aircraft Company's Tulsa Division in Oklahoma. The fairings, 10 ft. long and 5 ft. in diameter, are attached to the Agena D target vehicle and jettisoned in space, exposing the docking adapter for Gemini from Lockheed Missiles & Space Co. for eight sets of clam-shell fiber glass fairings and separation hardware. Tulsa, Oklahoma. Oct 19, 1961. Douglas Aircraft.

286. Photograph taken by the Ranger VII spacecraft before it impacted on the Moon at 6:25 a.m. PDT July 31. Viewed with the largest crater in the upper right hand corner, North is at the top. It was taken by the F-b camera with a 75 mm, f/2 lens at an altitude of 470 miles. It shows an area about 78 miles on a side. The smallest craters shown are about 800 ft. in diameter. The large crater in the upper right hand corner is Guericke. Numerous small secondary craters are shown on floor as well as two large conical craters. The larger of the two is about four miles in diameter. July 31, 1964. NASA.

287. Photograph taken Ranger VII spacecraft prior to its impact on the Moon at 6:25 a.m. PDT. Viewed with the largest crater in the upper right hand corner, North is at the top of the photograph. The picture was taken by the F-a camera with 25 mm, f/1 lens from an altitude of about three miles some 2.3 seconds before impact. The picture shows an area about one-and two-thirds miles on a side. The smallest craters shown are approximately 30 ft. in diameter and ten ft. deep. There are many craters with rounded shoulders. One rounded crater, at left toward the top of the photograph is about 300 ft. in diameter and has an angular rock mass in its center which might possibly be responsible for its origin. Ranger is a project of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. July 31, 1964. NASA.

288. Photograph taken by the Ranger VII spacecraft prior to its impact on the Moon at 6:25 a.m. PDT July 31. Viewed with the clock at the upper left hand corner, North is at the top of the photograph. The picture was taken by the F-a camera with a 25 mm, f/1 lens at an altitude of about 235 miles some two minutes 46 seconds before impact. The photo shows an area about 113 miles on a side. The eventual impact point of Ranger VII is approximately on the border between the two squares in the upper right hand corner as defined by the reseau marks. The smallest craters are about 1,000 ft. in diameter and are shown with a resolution about four times Earth-based photography. July 31, 1964. NASA.

289. Photograph taken by Ranger VII spacecraft prior to its impact on the Moon at 6:25 a.m. PDT. Viewed with the largest crater in the upper right hand corner North is at the top of the photo. The picture was taken by the F-a camera with a 25 mm, f/1 lens from an altitude of about three miles some 2.3 seconds before impact. The picture shows an area about one-and-two-thirds miles on a side. The smallest craters shown are approximately 30 ft. in diameter and ten ft. deep. There are many craters with rounded shoulders. One rounded crater, at left toward the top of the photo is about 300 ft in diameter and has an angular rock mass in its center which might possibly be responsible for its origin. Ranger is a project of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. July 31, 1964. NASA.

290. Photo taken by Ranger VII spacecraft prior to its impact on the Moon at 6:25 a.m. PDT July 31. Viewed with the partial picture and line of receiver noise at the top, North is at the top in both pictures. The top partial picture was the last taken by the P-3 camera with a 25 mm, f/1 lens before Ranger VII crashed into the Moon. The spacecraft was destroyed while transmitting, resulting in the receiver noise pattern. The picture was taken 1,000 ft. above the lunar surface and is of an area about 100 ft by 60 ft. It has a resolution one-thousand times better than seen by Earth-based observations. The smallest craters are about three ft. in diameter and one ft. in depth. The lower complete picture, showing an area about 100 ft. on a side, was taken by the P-1 camera with a 75 mm, f/2 lens at an altitude of about 3,000 ft. Many of the craters shown have rounded shoulders in contrast with most larger lunar creatures. Ranger VII is a program of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and its Jet Propulsion Laboratory. July 31 1964. NASA.

291. Photographic representation of digital data radioed from Mars by the Mariner IV spacecraft. Mariner photographed Mars beginning at 5:18:33 p.m., PDT, July 14, 1965, just prior to its closest approach of about 6,000 miles from the planet at 6:01 p.m. Viewed with data block at left, north is at top. Sun in 25 from the zenith, from the southeast in the photo. Bright region between Trivium charontis and Propontus II Phlegra, a bright region is on the limb. Slant Range: 10,500 miles. Area covered: along the limb: about 410 miles from limb to edge of the photos; about 800 miles. Location: (picture center:) 35 North Latitude, 122 East Longitude. Top frame most recent intermediate step of data processing, including contrast enhancement factor of two and fiducial marks removed. Lower left frame- raw picture. Lower right frame-with preliminary processing as released Thursday, July 15, 1965. 5:18:33 p.m. PDT, July 14, 1965. NASA.

292. Photographic representation of digital data radioed from Mars by the Mariner IV spacecraft. Mariner photographed Mars beginning at 5:18:33 p.m. PDT, July 14, 1965. Just prior to its closest approach of about 6,000 miles from the planet at 6:01 p.m. Viewed with data block at left, north is at top. Sun is 20 from the zenith, from the southeast in the photo. Bright region northeast of Trivium Charontis. Slant range: 10,100 miles. Area covered: East-West: 290 miles, North-South: 530 miles. Location: 27 North Latitude 174 East Longitude. The picture has a contrast enhancement factor of two. 5:19:21 p.m. PDT. July 14, 1965. NASA.

293. Photographic representation of digital data radioed from Mars by the Mariner IV spacecraft. Mariner photographed Mars beginning at 5:18:33 p.m. PDT, July 14, 1965. Just prior to its closest approach of about 6,000 miles from the planet at 6:01 p.m. Viewed with data block at left, north is at top. Sun is 14 from the zenith, from the east in the photo. Bright region southeast of Trivium Charontis. Slant Range: 9,500 miles. Area covered: East-West: 220 miles. Location: 13 North Latitude, 177 East Longitude. Contrast enhancement factor of five. Considerable fine tonal detail is apparent, but differentiation between topographic features and surface reflectivity variations is particularly difficult under the lighting and viewing conditions under which this photograph was taken. 5:20:57 p.m., PDT, July 14, 1965, NASA.

294. Photographic representation of digital data radioed from Mars by the Mariner IV spacecraft. Mariner photographed Mars beginning at 5:18:33 p.m. PDT, July 14, 1965. Just prior to its closest approach of about 6,000 miles from the planet at 6:01 p.m. Viewed with data block at left, north is at top. Sun is 14 from the zenith, from the northeast in the photo. Bright region is Mesogaea. Slant range: 9,3000 miles. Area covered: East-West: 210 miles. North-South: 270 miles. Location: 7 North Latitude, 179 East Longitude. Contrast enhancement factor of two. 5:21:45 p.m. PDT, July 14, 1965. NASA.

295. Photographic representation of digital data radioed from Mars by the Mariner IV spacecraft. Mariner photographed Mars beginning at 5:18:33 p.m. PDT, July 14, 1965. Just prior to its closest approach of about 6,000 miles from the planet at 6:01 p.m. Viewed with data block at left, north is at top. Sun is 19 from zenith, from the north in the photo. Bright region in eastern Zephyria. Slant range: 8,900 miles. Area covered: East-West: 190 miles. North-South: 220 miles. Location: 2 South Latitude, 181 East Longitude. Contrast enhancement factor of two. 5:23:21 p.m., PDT, July 14, 1965. NASA.

296. Photographic representation of digital data radioed from Mars by the Mariner IV spacecraft. Mariner photographed Mars beginning at 5:18:33 p.m. PDT, July 14, 1965, just prior to its closest approach of about 6,000 miles from the planet at 6:01 p.m. Viewed with data block at left, north is at top. Sun is 220 from the zenith, from the North in the photo. Bright region in eastern Zephyria. Slant range: 8,700 miles. Area covered: East-West: 190 miles. North-South: 200 miles. Location: 6 South Latitude, 183 East Longitude. 5:24:09 p.m. PDT, July 14, 1965. NASA.

297. Photographic representation of digital data radioed from Mars by the Mariner IV spacecraft. Mariner IV photographed Mars beginning at 5:18:33 p.m. PDT, July 14, 1965, just prior to its closest approach of about 6,000 miles from the planet at 6:01 p.m. Viewed with data block at left, north is at top. Sun is 29 from zenith, from the North in the photo. Bright region in southeastern Zephyria, near Mare Sirenum. Slant range: 8,400 miles. Area covered: East-West: 180 miles. North-South: 180 miles. Location: 13 South Latitude, 186 East Longitude. Contrast enhancement factor of two. 5:22:45 p.m., PDT, July 14, 1965. NASA.

298. Photographic representation of digital data radioed from Mars by the Mariner IV spacecraft. Mariner IV photographed Mars beginning at 5:18:33 p.m. PDT, July 14, 1965, just prior to its closest approach of about 6,000 miles from the planet at 6:01 p.m. Viewed with data block at left, north is top. Sun is 32 from the zenith, from the north in the photo. Border between Zephyria and Mare Sirenum. Slant range: 8,300 miles. Area covered: East-west: 180 miles. North-South: 170 miles. Location: 16 South Latitude, 187 East Longitude. Contrast enhancement factor of two. 5:26:33 p.m. PDT, July 14, 1965. NASA.

299. Photogenic representation of digital data radioed from Mars by the Mariner IV spacecraft. Mariner photographed Mars beginning at 5:18:33 p.m. PDT, July 14, 1965, just prior to its closest approach of about 6,000 miles from the planet at 6:01 p.m. Viewed with data block at left, north is at top. Sun is 38 from zenith, from the north in the photo. Mare Sirenum, bordering on Atlantis in the southwest corner of the frame. Slant range: 8,100 miles. Area covered: East-West: 170 miles. North-South: 160 miles. Location: 23 South Latitude, 191 East Longitude. Contrast enhancement factor of four. 5:28:09 p.m., PDT, July 14, 1965. NASA.

300. Photographic representation of digital data radioed from Mars by the Mariner IV spacecraft. Mariner photographed Mars beginning at 5:18:33 p.m., PDT, July 14, 1965, just prior to its closest approach of about 6,000 miles from the planet at 6:01 p.m. Viewed with data block at left, north is at top. Sun is 41 from zenith, from the north in the photo. Atlantis bordering on Mare Sirenum in the northeast corner of the frame. Slant range: 8,000 miles. Area covered: East-West: 170 miles, North-south: 160 miles. Location: 26 South Latitude, 192 East longitude. Contrast enhancement factor of two. 5:28:57 p.m., PDT, July 14, 1965. NASA.

Go to Monroney Photos 301-350
A. S. Mike Monroney Collection Description
A. S. Mike Monroney Photo Collection Description
Carl Albert Center Photo Inventories


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