USChina30title

 

729 Elm
Norman OK 73019-2105
(405) 325-3580
FAX: (405) 325-7738
uschina at ou dot edu

Peter Hays Gries
Harold J. & Ruth Newman Chair in US-China Issues

BOOKS

The Politics of American Foreign Policy: How Ideology Divides Liberals and Conservatives over Foreign Affairs (Stanford University Press, 2014).

China's New Nationalism: Pride, Politics, and Diplomacy (The University of California Press, 2004).

EDITED BOOKS

Chinese Politics: State, Society and the Market, co-edited with Stanley Rosen (Routledge, 2010).

State and Society in 21st-Century China: Crisis, Contention, and Legitimation, co-edited with Stanley Rosen (Routledge, 2004).


SELECTED PEER REVIEWED ARTICLES AND CHAPTERS

“How Ideology Divides American Liberals and Conservatives over Middle East Policy,” Political Science Quarterly, forthcoming 2015. Peter Hays Gries.
 
“‘Red China’ and the ‘Yellow Peril’: How Ideology Divides Americans over China,” Journal of East Asian Studies 14 (2014), 317–346. Peter Hays Gries.

“Taiwanese Views of China and the World: Party Identification, Ethnicity, and Cross–Strait Relations,” Japanese Journal of Political Science, 14 (1) (2013): 73–96. Peter Gries & Jenny Su.

“National narcissism: Internal dimensions and international correlates,” PsyCh Journal 2 (2013): 122-132. Huajian Cai and Peter Gries.

“China” in Zach P. Messitte and Suzette R. Grillot, eds., Understanding the Global Community (Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press, 2013). Peter Gries.

“Toward the Scientific Study of Polytheism: Beyond Forced-Choice Measures of Religious Belief,” Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, 51 (4) (2012): 623-637. Peter Gries, Jenny Su & David Schak.

“Disillusionment and Dismay: How Chinese Netizens Think and Feel About the Two Koreas,” Journal of East Asian Studies, 12 (2012), 31–56. Peter Gries.

“God, guns, and . . . China? How ideology impacts American attitudes and policy preferences toward China,” International Relations of the Asia-Pacific (2012) 12(1): 1-40. Peter Hays Gries, H. Michael Crowson and Huajian Cai.

“Determinants of security and insecurity in international relations: A cross-national experimental analysis of symbolic and material gains and losses,” Peter Gries, Kaiping Peng, and H. Michael Crowson. Chapter 7 in Psychology and Constructivism in International Relations: An Ideational Alliance, Vaughn Shannon and Paul Kowert, eds. (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2012).

“When knowledge is a double edged sword: Contact, media exposure, and American attitudes towards China,” Journal of Social Issues, 67, 4 (2011): 787-805. Peter Hays Gries, H. Michael Crowson, & Huajian Cai.

“Toward a social psychology of globalization,” Journal of Social Issues, 67, 4 (2011): 663-676. CYChiu, PH Gries, P., CJ Torelli, & SY Cheng.

“Patriotism, Nationalism, and China’s U.S. Policy: Structures and Consequences of Chinese National Identity,” The China Quarterly, 205 (March 2011). Peter Hays Gries, Qingmin Zhang, H. Michael Crowson, & Huajian Cai.

“The Spectre of Communism in US China Policy: Bipartisanship in the American Subconscious,” The Chinese Journal of International Politics, 3 (2010). Peter Hays Gries, Huajian Cai and H. Michael Crowson.

“Experimental Methods and Psychological Measures in the Study of Chinese Foreign Policy,” in Contemporary Chinese Politics: New Sources, Methods, and Field Strategies, Carlson, Gallagher, Lieberthal, and Manion, eds. Cambridge University Press, 2010.

“Do right-wing authoritarianism and social dominance orientation predict anti-china attitudes?” Psicología Política (Spain), 40 ( 2010), 7-29. H. Michael Crowson and Peter Hays Gries.

“Political orientation, party affiliation, and American attitudes towards China,” Journal of Chinese Political Science, vol. 15, no. 3 (2010), 219-244. Peter Hays Gries and H. Michael Crowson.

“The Olympic effect on American attitudes towards China: Beyond personality, ideology, and media exposure,” Journal of Contemporary China, Vol. 19, No 64, 2010. Peter Hays Gries, H. Michael Crowson, Todd Sandel, & Huajian Cai.

“Contentious Histories and the Perception of Threat: China, the United States, and the Korean War—An Experimental Analysis,” Peter Hays Gries, Jennifer L. Prewitt-Freilino, Luz-Eugenia Cox-Fuenzalida, and Qingmin Zhang, Journal of East Asian Studies, 9 (2009), 433–465.

“Problems of Misperception in U.S.-China relations,” Orbis, Spring 2009, pp. 220-232.

“Historical Beliefs and the Perception of Threat in Northeast Asia: Colonialism, the Tributary System, and China-Japan-Korea Relations in the Twenty-First Century,” Peter Hays Gries; Qingmin Zhang; Yasuki Masui; & Yong Wook Lee, International Relations of the Asia-Pacific, 9.2 (2009): 245-265.

“政治取向与美国对华政策” (Political orientation and US-China policy), 《美国研究》 (American Studies, Beijing) , Fall 2008. With Howard M. Crowson.

“China’s Rise: A Review Essay,” Asian Security, vol. 4, no. 1, 2008, pp. 101–105.

“Harmony, Hegemony, & U.S.-China Relations,” World Literature Today, August 2007, Vol. 81.5.

“Forecasting US-China relations, 2015,” Asian Security, Vol. 2, No. 2 (June 2006), pp. 1-23

“China’s ‘New Thinking’ on Japan,” The China Quarterly, Vol. 184, December 2005, pp. 831-50.

“Chinese Nationalism: Challenging the State?” Current History, September 2005, pp. 251-56.

“浅析中国民族主义: 历史, 人民, 情感” (Chinese nationalism: The past, the people, and their passions), 《世界经济与政治》 (World Economics and Politics, Beijing) , November, 2005.

“China Eyes the Hegemon,” Orbis: A Journal Of World Affairs, Summer 2005, pp. 401-412.

“The Koguryo Controversy, National Identity, and Sino-Korean Relations Today,” East Asia: An International Quarterly, Vol. 22, No. 4 (2005), pp. 3-17

“Nationalism, Indignation, and China’s Japan Policy,” The SAIS Review of International Affairs, Vol XXV, No. 2 (Summer-Fall 2005), pp. 105-114.

“Social Psychology and the Identity-Conflict Debate: Is a ‘China Threat’ Inevitable?” The European Journal of International Relations, Vol. 11, No. 2 (June 2005), pp. 235-265.

“The Perception of the Other in International Relations: Evidence for the Polarizing Effect of Entitativity,” Emanuele Castano, Simona Sacchi, and Peter Hays Gries, Political Psychology, Vol. 24, No. 3 (2003), pp. 449-68.

“Culture Clash? Apologies East and West,” Peter Hays Gries and Peng Kaiping, The Journal of Contemporary China Vol. 11, No. 30 (February 2002), pp. 173-178.

“Power and Resolve in U.S. China Policy,” International Security 26:2 (Fall 2001): 155-165. Correspondence with Thomas Christensen over Chinese military capabilities and intentions.

“Tears of Rage: Chinese Nationalism and the Belgrade Embassy Bombing,” The China Journal, No. 46 (July 2001), pp. 25-43.

“A ‘China Threat’? Power and Passion in Chinese ‘Face Nationalism’,” World Affairs No. 162.2 (Fall 1999), pp. 63-75.

SELECTED BOOK REVIEWS
Benjamin I. Page and Tao Xie. Living with the Dragon: How the American Public Views the Rise of China. New York: Columbia University Press. 2010. For Public Opinion Quarterly (2011).

SELECTED OP-EDS
"Why China Resents Japan, and Us," New York Times, 24 August 2012.

 

 

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