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2009 Newman Prize Jury and Nominees

Juror                     Nominee           Representative Work
Kirk Denton                Yan Lianke           Dreams of Ding Village(2006)
Howard Goldblatt       Mo Yan              Life and Death Are Wearing Me Out (2006)
Liu Hongtao                 Jin Yong            The Deer and the Cauldron (1969-1972)
Peng Hsiao-yen            Zhu Tianxin         Ancient Capital(1997)
Xu Zidong                    Wang anyi         The Song of Everlasting Sorrow(2000)
Zhang Yiwu                  Wang Meng           The Transformer (1985)
Zhao Yiheng                 Ning Ken            The City of Masks (2001)

Jury Coordinator:Haiyan Lee

 

kdHoward Goldblatt is Research Professor at the University of Notre Dame and an internationally renowned translator of modern Chinese literature. The recipient of two translation fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, he has translated more than forty novels and story collections from China and Taiwan into English. His translations have been awarded the Translation of the Year Prize from the American Literary Translators Association (for Notes of a Desolate Man by Chu T’ien-wen; Sylvia Li-chun Lin, co-tr., 1999) and the inaugural Man Asian Literary Prize (for Wolf Totem by Jiang Rong, 2007). 

Since receiving his Ph.D. from Indiana University in 1974, Howard Goldblatt has taught modern Chinese literature and culture for more than a quarter of a century, and has authored and edited half a dozen books on Chinese literature. The founding editor of the scholarly journal Modern Chinese Literature (renamed Modern Chinese Literature and Culture), he serves on the editorial and advisory boards of many scholarly and literary magazines, and has contributed essays and articles to The Washington Post, The Times of London, TIME Magazine, World Literature Today, and The Los Angeles Times, as well as scholarly books and journals.  He was recently profiled in the influential Chinese newspaper Southern Weekend (http://www.infzm.com/content/trs/raw/41155).

 

ghHoward Goldblatt is Research Professor at the University of Notre Dame and an internationally renowned translator of modern Chinese literature. The recipient of two translation fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, he has translated more than forty novels and story collections from China and Taiwan into English. His translations have been awarded the Translation of the Year Prize from the American Literary Translators Association (for Notes of a Desolate Man by Chu T’ien-wen; Sylvia Li-chun Lin, co-tr., 1999) and the inaugural Man Asian Literary Prize (for Wolf Totem by Jiang Rong, 2007). 
Since receiving his Ph.D. from Indiana University in 1974, Howard Goldblatt has taught modern Chinese literature and culture for more than a quarter of a century, and has authored and edited half a dozen books on Chinese literature. The founding editor of the scholarly journal Modern Chinese Literature (renamed Modern Chinese Literature and Culture), he serves on the editorial and advisory boards of many scholarly and literary magazines, and has contributed essays and articles to The Washington Post, The Times of London, TIME Magazine, World Literature Today, and The Los Angeles Times, as well as scholarly books and journals.  He was recently profiled in the influential Chinese newspaper Southern Weekend.
(http://www.infzm.com/content/trs/raw/41155)。

 

htlLiu Hongtao was born in 1962 in China. He is professor of comparative literature and associate dean of the Faculty of Arts at Beijing Normal University.  He received his BA from Henan University in 1984, MA in World Literature from Nankai University in 1989, and Ph.D. in Modern and Contemporary Chinese Literature from East China Normal University in 1995. He has been a visiting scholar at the University of Trento, University of Nottingham, and Cambridge University. He is a council member of the Beijing Comparative Literature Association and Chinese Comparative Literature Education and Research Association.

His published monographs include: Regional Literature and Culture in Hunan (Hunan jiaoyu chubanshe, 1997), Border Town: The Pastoral and the Image of China (Guangxi jiaoyu chubanshe, 2003), A New Perspective on Shen Congwen’s Fiction (Beijing shifan daxue chubanshe, 2005), Xu Zhimo and Cambridge University (Taiwan xiuwei zixun keji youxian gongsi, 2007), The Wasteland and Its Rescue: D.H. Lawrence’s Fiction in the Context of Modernism (Zhongguo shehui kexue chubanshe, 2007).

He is the editor-in-chief of a number of textbooks and study guides, including: A Guide to Foreign Literature (Zhongguo renmin daxue chubanshe, 2004), History of Comparative World Literature (first author of Volume 2) (Jiangxi jiaoyu chubanshe, 2004), and A History of Western Literature (volume 1 co-author) (Sichuan renmin chubanshe, 2003).

 

xyPeng Hsiao-yen received her B.A. in Western Languages and Literatures from National Chengchi University, M.A. in Foreign Languages and Literatures from National Taiwan University, and Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from Harvard University.  She taught at National Taiwan University before becoming a researcher at the Institute of Chinese Literature and Philosophy of Academia Sinica. She is the author of Chaoyue xieshi (Beyond realism), Lishi henduo loudong (There are many loopholes in history), and Haishang shuo qingyu (Desire in Shanghai); and editor of Yang Kui quanji (Complete works of Yang Kui), 14 volumes. She has also published two short story collections: Duanzhang Shunniang (Shunniang with broken palm lines) and Chunzhen niandai (Age of innocence).

 

 

                                                 
zdXu Zidong was born in Tiantai, Zhejiang Province. He holds the master’s degrees from East China Normal University (1992) and UCLA (1993), and the doctoral degree from the Chinese Department at the University of Hong Kong (1997). He began his academic career as an associate professor at East China Normal University in 1985. Currently he is professor of Chinese literature at Lingnan University and visiting professor at Peking University, He has also been a visiting scholar at the University of Hong Kong (Sino-British Fellow), a research fellow at the University of Chicago (Luce Fellow), the vice chairman of the Chinese Society for Theoretical Studies in Literature and Art, a research affiliate at the Fudan Research Center for Literary Theory and Aesthetics, and an adjunct professor at East China Normal University. In addition, he is an honorary host of Qiangqiang sanrenxing (Behind the Headlines with Wen Tao), a talk show program on the Phoenix cable television.

His major publications include: Yudafu xinlun (Revisiting Yu Dafu, 1984), Dangdai wenxue yinxiang (Impressions of Contemporary Chinese Literature, 1987), Dangdai xiaoshuo yuedu biji (Notes on Contemporary Chinese Fiction, 1997), Weile wangque de jiti jiyi – jiedu wushipian wenge xiaoshuo (Remembering and Forgetting: Reading Fifty Cultural Revolution Stories, 2000), Dangdai xiaoshuo yu jiti jiyi: xushu wenge (Contemporary Chinese Fiction and Collective Memory: Narrating the Cultural Revolution, 2000), Nahan yu liuyan (Call to Arms and Hearsay, 2004), Xianggang duanpian xiaoshuo chutan (A Preliminary Study of Hong Kong Short Stories, 2005). He is the editor of several volumes of Hong Kong short fiction anthologies as well as Shushuiguan senlin (Forest of Water Pipes, 2001), Houzhimin shiwu yu aiqing (Postcolonial Food and Love, 2003), Zaidu Zhang Ailing (Rereading Eileen Chang, 2002, co-editor), and Wu ai ji (A Loveless Record, 2005). He has won more than ten awards for his articles and books.


Zhang Yiwu is a professor in the Chinese Department and the deputy director of the Center for Cultural Resources at Peking University. His teaching and research interests include contemporary Chinese literature, film, popular culture and critical theory. Since the 1990s, he has conducted a series of pioneering studies on the relationship between globalization and contemporary Chinese culture, and provided innovative interpretations of the cultural phenomena of China in transition. He has written Zai bianyuanchu zhuisuo (Explorations on the Margins), Da zhuanxing (The Great Transformation), Cong xiandaixing dao houxiandaixing (From Modernity to Postmodernity), “Xinxin Zhongguo” de xingxiang (Images of the New New China), among others.

 

yhZhao Yiheng, semiotician and columnist, was educated at Nanjing University, the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, and the University of California, Berkeley. He taught in the School of Oriental and African Studies at the University of London for many years before becoming a professor of comparative literature in the Faculty of Arts at Sichuan University. He is a regular contributor to Shucheng (Book City), Wanxiang (Panorama), Xinjing bao (New Beijing News), Waitan huabao (The Bund Pictorial), Nandu zhoukan (Southern Metropolis Weekly), Nüyou (Lady Companion), and others.

His Chinese monographs include: Yuanyou de shishen (Traveling Muses, 1983), Xin piping (New Criticism, 1984), Wenxue fuhaoxue (Literary Semiotics, 1990), Kunao de xushuzhe (The Uneasy Narrator, 1991), Dang shuozhe beishuo de shihou: bijiao xushuxue daolun (When a Narrator is Narrated: A Guide to Comparative Narratology, 1997), Biyao de gudu: xingshi wenhuaxue lunji (Necessary Solitude: Essays on Formal Aesthetics, 1998), Jianli yizhong xiandai chanju (Towards a Modern Zen Theatre, 1998), Lijiao xiayan zhihou: zhongguo wenhua pipan zhuwenti (The Extension of Confucianism: Problems in Chinese Cultural Criticism, 2001), Duian de youhuo (Temptations from the Other Shore, 2003), etc.

His English monographs include The Uneasy Narrator: Chinese Fiction from the Traditional to the Modern (1995) and Towards a Modern Zen Theatre (2001). He is also a creative writer, best known for Jushilin de aliaosha (Alyosha in the Buddhist Lodge, novella, 1994) and Shamo yu sha (Desert and Sand, novel, 1995).

 

Jury Coordinator

 

haiyanHaiyan Lee teaches modern China studies at the University of Hong Kong.  She received her BA in philosophy and religious studies from Peking University, MA in East Asian civilizations from the University of Chicago, and Ph.D. in Chinese literature from Cornell University.  She taught at Cornell, Harvard, and the University of Colorado at Boulder before coming to Hong Kong.  She is the author of Revolution of the Heart: A Genealogy of Love in China, 1900-1950 (Stanford University Press, 2007), and guest editor of “Taking It to Heart: Emotion, Modernity, Asia,” a special issue of positions: east asia cultures critique (16.2, 2008).