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Samuel Duwe

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Samuel Duwe

Samuel Duwe, Assistant Professor in the University of Oklahoma's Department of Anthropology

Associate Professor
Ph.D. University of Arizona, 2011
B.A. University of Michigan, 2003

Office: Dale Hall Tower 514
Email: duwe@ou.edu
Academia.edu Profile

Research Interests

  • Archaeology and ethnography of the American Southwest
  • Landscape and human-environment interactions
  • Indigenous archaeologies
  • Cosmology and religion
  • Ceramic analysis
  • Archaeometry
  • Public education and archaeology

Background

My interests focus on integrating archaeology, oral history, ethnography, and historical documents to understand the development of worldview and society. My research focuses on Pueblo communities in northern New Mexico. Recently I've addressed migration, ethnogenesis, colonial encounters, and the challenges and opportunities of contemporary collaborative archaeology.

My research projects also attempt to integrate undergraduate and graduate students. Prior to work in New Mexico, I conducted survey and excavation in northern Arizona, as well as eastern Europe.

Selected Publications

2020    Tewa Worlds: An Archaeological History of Being and Becoming in the Pueblo Southwest. University of Arizona Press, Tucson.

2019    The Continuous Path: Pueblo Movement and the Archaeology of Becoming. University of Arizona Press, Tucson. (edited with Robert W. Preucel)

2019    Tewa Origins and Middle Places. In The Continuous Path: Pueblo Movement and the Archaeology of Becoming, edited by Samuel Duwe and Robert W. Preucel, pp. 96-123. University of Arizona Press, Tucson. (with Patrick Cruz)

2019    Engaging with Pueblo Movement: An Introduction. In The Continuous Path: Pueblo Movement and the Archaeology of Becoming, edited by Samuel Duwe and Robert W. Preucel, pp. 1-33. University of Arizona Press, Tucson. (with Robert W. Preucel)

2019    The Economics of Becoming: Population Coalescence and the Production and Distribution of Ancestral Tewa Pottery. In Reframing the Northern Rio Grande Pueblo Economy, edited by Scott G. Ortman, pp. 104-118. Anthropological Papers of the University of Arizona, no. 80. University of Arizona Press, Tucson.

2017    A Bird’s-Eye View of Proto-Tewa Subsistence Agriculture: Making the Case for Floodplain Farming in the Ohkay Owingeh Homeland, New Mexico. American Antiquity 82(2):397-413. (with B. Sunday Eiselt, J. Andrew Darling, Mark Willis, Chester Walker, William Hudspeth, and Leslie Reeder-Meyers)

2016    Cupules and the Creation of the Tewa Pueblo World. Journal of Lithic Studies 3(3).

2016    The Pueblo Decomposition Model: A Method for Quantifying Architectural Rubble to Estimate Population Size. Journal of Archaeological Science 65:20-31. (with B. Sunday Eiselt, J. Andrew Darling, Mark D. Willis, and Chester Walker)

2013    Ecological Uncertainty and Organizational Flexibility on the Prehispanic Tewa Landscape: Notes from the Northern Frontier. In Mountain and Valley: Understanding Past Land Use in the Northern Rio Grande Valley, New Mexico, edited by Bradley J. Vierra, pp. 95-112. University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City. (with Kurt F. Anschuetz)