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Future, Current, and Recent Course Offerings

Future Courses: Fall 2022

To find out when and and where courses are being taught, click here.

Art History 3303 – RENAISSANCE ART IN ITALY. Kirk Duclaux. Focuses on Renaissance art and architecture in Italy from a social and cultural framework, beginning in the 1200's and ending around 1580. Taught on OU's campus in Arezzo, Italy.

Art History 3403 – BAROQUE ART & ARCHITECTURE IN EUROPE. Allison Palmer. Covers art and architecture in Europe in the seventeenth century, during the time period called the Baroque.

Drama 3713 – HISTORY OF THE THEATRE I. Jennifer Ezell, sects. 001-002; Thomas Pender, sects. 300-303. Acquaints the student with the development of drama, theatre and production procedures through the ages from 500 B.C. to 1780.

English 2543 – ENGLISH LITERATURE FROM 1375 TO 1700. Jason Lubinski. This course surveys English literature from the Middle Ages to the end of the seventeenth century—from Old English epic to Restoration poetry. As we move across nearly one thousand years of literary history, we will track a set of common themes (including heroism and villainy, love and desire, religious ritual, politics and violence, social critique, identity and otherness) and genres (epic, lyric, satire, tragedy), as well as the evolution of the English language itself. Each text will offer us a window into worlds impossibly distant yet unsettlingly familiar. Throughout the course, we will seek to understand the texts themselves, the periods in which they were written, and their place in the development of English literature.

English 4523 – SHAKESPEARE COMEDIES. Karen Feiner. Close reading and analysis of Shakespeare's comedies and histories. Selected criticism, 1600 to the present. Historical background and Shakespeare's theatre. Dramatic traditions, movie interpretations, performance theory and acting. Emphases and reading lists vary from year to year.

English 4970/5513 – CHAUCER AND THE 14th CENTURY. Joyce Coleman. This course will explore the period and the poet that created English literature. Geoffrey Chaucer liked to write himself into his fictions as an innocent stumbling around the language—but he was a brilliant, subtle writer: a linguistic innovator, a master of form, and a penetrating student of human nature. The course will place Chaucer and his achievements within the context of the literary system of his time and the other writers of the period.

French G4153 – SURVEY OF FRENCH LITERATURE TO 1800. Logan Whalen. Reading and discussion of major French works and their background from the Middle Ages to the French Revolution.

French 4313 – FROM LASCAUX TO LA TERREUR. Michael Winston. The political and social background of French literature from its beginning to the French revolution.

History 3113 – THE CRUSADES.. Roberta Magnusson. Covers crusades to the Holy Land and Europe against Moors, pagans, heretics, and enemies of the Pope. Topics include crusade ideology, relations between Latins, Byzantines, Jews and Muslims, crusader states, techniques of warfare, and the experience of crusading.

History 3993 – THE EVOLUTION OF MARTYRDOM. Shmuel Shepkaru. Traces the historical development of martyrdom in Judaism and Christianity to understand what motivated individuals and communities to give up their lives for their convictions. Compare the evolution of the idea of martyrdom in Judaism and Christianity to identify differences and similarities between these two faiths.

History of Science 3013 – HISTORY OF SCIENCE TO NEWTON. Peter Barker, sects. 102 and 103; Rienk Vermij, sect. 003. A survey of Western people's efforts to understand the natural world, from earliest historical times to the seventeenth century.

History of Science 3453 – SCIENCE AND CIVILIZATION IN ISLAM. Younes Mahdavi. History of scientific traditions and ideas in Islamic civilization, from the origins of Islam to the early modern period. Emphasis is on the derivation, development and transmission of Islamic science, as well as on the assimilation and influence of science within Islamic culture.

History of Science 5513 – ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL SCIENCE. Kathleen Crowther. Thematic historical analyses of ancient and/or medieval foundations of science, focusing on the development of particular disciplines or scientific institutions, the relationship between science and religion, or transmission of science. Includes examination of sources and critical assessment of scholarly interpretations.

MLLL 3313 – INTRODUCTION TO ITALIAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE. Roberto Pesce. Interdisciplinary approach to literature, culture, and history of the Italian peninsula, from the Middle Ages to the present day. Through major works of literature, political science, the visual arts, music, and cinema, students will set Italy's variegated literary and cultural expressions in their social and historical contexts.

MLLL 3623 – PRE-MODERN JAPANESE LITERATURE. Joshua Frydman. A survey of Japanese literature from ancient time to the Meiji restoration. Covers prominent works of poetry and prose in English translation. Students are introduced to traditional genres, themes, rhetorical device and aesthetics, as well as socio-historical context of literary production.

MLLL 4063 – EARLY LITERARY CRITICISM. A. Lauer. An introduction to the main critical ideas of the West (from Plato onward), with special emphasis on Plato and Aristotle; Greek and Latin Rhetoric (Aristotle, Cicero); the Middle Ages (St. Augustine, Boethius, St. Thomas Aquinas); Italian Renaissance Humanism (Boccaccio, Castelvetro, Mazzoni, Tasso); French Baroque (Corneille); German Idealism (Kant, Hegel, Schopenhauer) and Vitalism (Nietzsche, Freud); French Naturalism (Taine, Zola), German Materialism (Marx, Engels); and Anglo-Irish Modernism (Oscar Wilde). This course attempts to establish a solid critical foundation on aesthetics that would enable advanced undergraduates (Junior standing) and graduate students to deal with fundamental ideas—aesthetic and social—developed later by post-Enlightenment thinkers. The emphasis on Greek and Latin rhetoric during the fourth part of the semester will enable students to write strategically and to develop effective (verbal, tonal, and non-verbal) communicative skills. Rhetoric also fosters moral character.

Music 2313 – ANCIENT TIMES TO 1700. Jennifer Saltzstein, sects. 001 and 002. A study of the development of music from its inception to the late Baroque era conducted through lectures, readings, listening and analysis.

Spanish 4083 – LITERATURE AND CULTURE OF SPAIN. Luis Cortest. Introduces the literature and culture of Spain. It covers canonical texts from the Early to the Early Modern Period. It also emphasizes culture throughout its rich history. Like all other courses in Spanish, it emphasizes as well all four language skills (hearing, speaking, reading, and writing) and culture.

Current Courses: Spring 2022

To find out when and and where courses are being taught, click here.

Art History 2303 – INTRODUCTION TO ART IN EUROPE. Allison Palmer. An introduction to art and architecture of the early modern period in Europe, from the beginning of the Renaissance in the 1300s until the end of the French Revolution, around 1800.

Art History 3303 – RENAISSANCE ART IN ITALY. Kirk Duclaux. Focuses on Renaissance art and architecture in Italy from a social and cultural framework, beginning in the 1200's and ending around 1580. Taught on OU's campus in Arezzo, Italy.

English 3573 – ARTHURIAN LEGEND AND LITERATURE. Slash-listed with MLLL 3573. Joyce Coleman. Examination of the legend of King Arthur in European literature. The class will concentrate on the historical Arthur, followed by medieval and modern literary texts concerning Arthur and the Round Table.

English 4533 – SHAKESPEARE TRAGEDIES. Joseph Mansky. Close reading and analysis of Shakespeare's tragedies and lyric poetry. Selected criticism, 1600 to the present. Historical background and Shakespeare's theatre. Dramatic traditions, movie interpretations, performance theory and acting. Emphases and reading lists vary from year to year.  

History 3073 – THE RENAISSANCE. Jane Wickersham. Examines the European Renaissance, a time period that was crucial to the development of western European culture, intellectual thought, and state formation. By reviving classical antiquity, the Renaissance created both the classical canon of intellectual study and modern political units.

History 3113 – THE CRUSADES. Roberta Magnusson. Covers crusades to the Holy Land and Europe against Moors, pagans, heretics, and enemies of the Pope. Topics include crusade ideology, relations between Latins, Byzantines, Jews and Muslims, crusader states, techniques of warfare, and the experience of crusading.

History 3733 – THE HISTORY OF HEAVEN AND HELL. Shmuel Shepkaru. Traces the evolution of the concept of the afterlife, eternal reward and punishment in Judaism and Christianity from late Antiquity to the high Middle Ages.

History 3773 – JEWS AND CHRISTIANS IN THE MIDDLE AGES. Shmuel Shepkaru. Traces the development of the relationship between the Jewish minority and the Christian majority in medieval Europe, from the fifth century to the early modern period. Discusses how Jews and Christians dealt with and imagined each other.

History of Science 3013 – THE HISTORY OF SCIENCE TO NEWTON. Rienk Vermij. A survey of Western people's efforts to understand the natural world, from earliest historical times to the seventeenth century.

History of Science 5523 – RENAISSANCE AND EARLY MODERN SCIENCE. Peter Barker. Advanced wtudies in the history of Renaissance and Early Modern science.

Modern Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics 3303 – THE WORLD OF DANTE. Roberto Pesce. In this course students will engage in a close reading of a fundamental text in the western literary tradition: Dante Alighieri's Divine Comedy. The course will also consider one of Dante's minor works, the Vita Nuova, as well as the modern critical readings of Dante's writing and thought. In lectures, special attention will be paid to the historical, political, literary and intellectual context of Dante's poetry and thought.

Modern Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics 3573 – ARTHURIAN LEGEND AND LITERATURE. Slash-listed with ENGL 3573. Joyce Coleman. Examination of the legend of King Arthur in European literature. The class will concentrate on the historical Arthur, followed by medieval and modern literary texts concerning Arthur and the Round Table.

Musicology 5513 – MUSIC IN THE MIDDLE AGES. Jennifer Saltzstein. A detailed survey of music from Hildegard of Bingen through Guillaume de Machaut. Explores a wide variety of medieval musical repertories, including major sacred and vernacular musical genres. Through detailed study of primary and secondary materials, we will examine musical structures as well as the historical contexts within which they were produced.

Musicology 5970 – MUSIC IN ITALY, 530-1643. Jennifer Saltzstein.

Spanish 4713/5713 – HISTORY OF THE SPANISH LANGUAGE. Luis Cortest. As an introduction to historical Spanish Linguistics, the basic patterns of the evolution of Modern Spanish from Vulgar Latin, as shown in several major literary texts will be learned. Provides an understanding of how the Modern Spanish sound system evolved from the Vulgar Latin of the Iberian Peninsula. Emphasizes as well all four language skills (hearing, speaking, reading, and writing) and culture.