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Emily Johnson

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Emily Johnson

Professor of Russian


Copeland 120B

emilydjohnson@ou.edu

Profile

Dr. Emily Johnson is a Professor of Russian. Before coming to the University of Oklahoma, she taught at Columbia University, Hofstra University, Drew University, and Williams College. Her research interests include the Petersburg myth and text, Russian popular culture, and the documentary heritage of the Soviet labor camp system. Dr. Johnson has received a number of faculty awards since arriving at the University of Oklahoma, including the Cecil W. Woods Memorial Award for Excellence in Teaching (2001), the Irene Rothbaum Award for Outstanding Junior Faculty in the College of Arts & Sciences (2005), the Dean’s Outstanding Academic Advising Award from the College of Arts and Sciences (2008), the Gary B. Cohen Award from the School of International and Area Studies (2009), the Vice-President for Research's Award for Outstanding Research Engagement (2012), and the Brian and Sandra O’Brien Presidential Professorship (2020). Her first book, How St. Petersburg Learned to Study Itself: The Russian Idea of Kraevedenie (Penn State University Press, 2006), won both the Antsiferov Prize for the Best Work on the City of St. Petersburg by a Foreign Author and the SCMLA Book Prize in Cultural Studies. For her work on Arsenii Formakov, Gulag Letters, translated, edited and introduced by Emily D. Johnson (Yale University Press, 2017), Dr. Johnson received the 2018 AATSEEL Book Prize for best scholarly translation. Dr. Johnson’s research has been funded by the Oklahoma Humanities Council, the South Central Modern Language Association, the American Council of Teachers of Russian, the Hoover Institution of Stanford University, and the National Council for Eurasian and East European Research. She is a member of the Editorial Board of the journal World Literature Today.

Selected Publications

Emily D. Johnson, “The Urban Context of Crime and Punishment,” forthcoming as part of Michael Katz and Alexander Burry, eds. MLA Approaches to Teaching Crime and Punishment.

Emily D. Johnson, “Kommentarii k lagernoi perepiske N. P. Antsiferova,” forthcoming in an edition of the correspondence of Nikolai Antsiferov edited by Dar’ia Moskovskaia (Novoe literaturnoe obozrenie, 2020).  

Julie A. Cassiday and Emily D. Johnson, ed. special issue on “Romance Fiction in the International Marketplace,” The Journal of Popular Romance Studies 9 (2020).  http://www.jprstudiestest.dreamhosters.com/issues/volume-9/

Emily D. Johnson, “Exploring His/Her Library: Reading and Books in Russian Romance,” special issue on “Romance Fiction in the International Marketplace,” The Journal of Popular Romance Studies 9 (2020). http://www.jprstudies.org/2020/03/exploring-his-her-library-reading-and-books-in-russian-romance/

Emily D. Johnson, “Remembering Chernobyl through the Lens of Post-Soviet Nostalgia,” Otto Boele, Ksenia Robbe, and Boris Noordenbos, eds. Post-Soviet Nostalgia: Confronting the Empire’s Legacies, Routledge Studies in Cultural History (Routledge, 2019).

Emily D. Johnson, “Performing Family Unity: Holiday Celebrations in the Labor Camp Correspondence of Arsenii Formakov,” in Julie Cassiday, Julie Buckler, and Boris Wolfson, eds., Russian Performances: Word, Object, Action (Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 2018): 252-61.

Emily D. Johnson, “A Voice from the Camps,” The Hoover Digest (fall 2017): 181-93.

Arsenii Formakov, Gulag Letters, edited, translated, and introduced by Emily D. Johnson (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2017). ---Excerpts published in Harper’s Magazine (April 2017) as Arsenii Formakov, “Silver Linings Daybook,” available online at: http://harpers.org/archive/2017/04/silver-linings-daybook/

Emily D. Johnson, "A New Song for the Motherland: Eurovision and the Rhetoric of Post-Soviet National Identity," Russian Review 73 (January 2014): 24-46.

Julie Buckler and Emily Johnson, ed., Rites of Place: Public Commemoration and Celebration in Russia and Eastern Europe (Evanston: Northwestern University Press, 2013).

Emily D. Johnson, “Jubilation Deferred: The Belated Commemoration of the 250th Anniversary of St. Petersburg/Leningrad,” in Rites of Place: Public Commemoration and Celebration in Russia and Beyond, Emily D. Johnson and Julie Buckler, eds. (Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2013), 81-102.

Emily D. Johnson, “Learning to Read Between the Lines: Miscommunication and Competing Notions of Victimhood in Private Gulag Correspondence,” working paper for the National Council for Eurasian and East European Research. http://www.nceeer.org/Papers/papers.php

Julie A. Cassiday and Emily D. Johnson, “Putin, Putiniana, and the Question of a Post-Soviet Cult of Personality,” Slavonic and East European Review 88:4 (October 2010), pp. 681-707.                                               ---Republished in an updated and abridged form as: Julie A. Cassiday and Emily D. Johnson, “A Personality Cult for the Post-Modern Age: Reading Vladimir Putin’s Public Persona,” in Putin as Celebrity and Cultural Icon, Helena Goscilo, ed. (New York: Routledge, 2012).

Emily D. Johnson, “Putin and Emptiness: The Place of Satire in the Contemporary Cult of Personality,” The Harriman Review 16:4 and 17:1 (May 2009), 1-6.

Emily D. Johnson, “Letters from the Gulag” Hoover Digest 2 (2009), pp. 199-207.

Emily D. Johnson How St. Petersburg Learned to Study Itself: The Russian Idea of Kraevedenie, (University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2006).

Emily D. Johnson, “Transcendence and the City: Nikolai Antsiferov’s The Soul of Petersburg as an Aesthetic Utopia,” in Moscow and Petersburg: The City in Russian Culture, ed. Ian Lilly. (Nottingham: Astra Press, 2002), 103-116.

Emily D. Johnson, “Nikita Khrushchev, Andrei Voznesensky, and the Cold Spring of 1963: A Newly Discovered Recording Documents the End of the Post-Stalin Thaw,” World Literature Today, 75:1 (Winter 2001): 30-39.

Education

Ph.D. in Russian Literature, Columbia University

Harriman Certificate, Columbia University

BA in Russian Civilization, UCLA

Research

Gulag Studies

The Petersburg Myth and Text

Russian popular culture

Documents

Emily Johnson CV