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International Research

Firat Demir
Professor
Department of Economics

Research
Development Economics, International Economics, Turkey, Middle East

Selected Publications
Books
1. “South-South Trade and Finance in the 21st Century: Rise of the South or a Second Great Divergence.” Anthem Press, 2016 (with O.S. Dahi). 

Publications in Refereed Journals
1. “Bilateral FDI Flows, Productivity Growth and Convergence: The North vs. the South.” World Development 101: 235 – 249, 2018 (with Y. Duan).
2. “South-South vs. South-North Economic Exchanges: Does it Matter Who is Exchanging What and with Whom?” Journal of Economic Surveys 31(5): 1449 – 1486, 2017 (with O.S. Dahi).
• Reprinted in R. Veneziani and L. Zamparelli (Eds.), Analytical Political Economy (p. 339 – 379). Wiley, 2018. 
3. “Exchange Rate Adjustments and US Trade with China: What does a State Level Analysis Tell Us?” Global Economy Journal 17(2): 1-14, 2017 (with C. Wu).
4. “Effects of FDI Flows on Institutional Development in the South: Does It Matter Where the Investors are from?” World Development 78: 341 – 359, 2016.
5. “Institutional Differences and Direction of Bilateral FDI Flows: Are South-South Flows any Different than the Rest?” The World Economy 39(12): 2000 – 2024, 2016 (with C. Hu).
6. “Total Factor Productivity, Foreign Direct Investment and Entry Barriers in Chinese Automobile Industry.” Emerging Markets Finance and Trade 52(2): 302 – 321, 2016 (with L. Su).
7. “Firm Productivity, Exchange Rate Movements, Sources of Finance and Export Orientation.” World Development 54: 204 – 219, 2014 (with M. Caglayan).
8. “Preferential Trade Agreements and Manufactured Goods Trade: Does It Matter Whom You PTA With?” Applied Economics 45(34): 4754 – 4772, 2013 (with O.S. Dahi).
9. “Growth under Exchange Rate Volatility: Does Access to Foreign or Domestic Equity Markets Matter.” Journal of Development Economics 100(1): 74 – 88, 2013.
• Winner of the 2013 Best Academic Paper Award by the Central Bank of Turkey.
10. “Trade Flows, Exchange Rate Uncertainty and Financial Depth: Evidence from 28 Emerging Countries.” Southern Economic Journal 79(4): 905 – 927, 2013 (with M. Caglayan and O.S. Dahi).
11. “Income Inequality and Structures of International Trade.” Asia Pacific Journal of Accounting and Economics 19(2): 167 – 180, 2012 (with J. Ju and Y. Zhou).
12. “Asymmetric Effects of Financial Development on South-South and South-North Trade: Panel Data Evidence from Emerging Markets.” Journal of Development Economics 94(1): 139 – 149, 2011 (with O.S. Dahi).
13. “Exchange Rate Volatility and Employment Growth in Developing Countries: Evidence from Turkey.” World Development 38(8): 1127 – 1140, 2010.
• Winner of the 2008 Ibn Khaldun Prize in Economics awarded by the Middle East Economics Association.
14. “Financial Liberalization, Private Investment and Portfolio Choice: Financialization of Real Sectors in Emerging Markets.” Journal of Development Economics 88(2): 314 – 324, 2009. 
15. “Capital Market Imperfections and Financialization of Real Sectors in Emerging Markets: Private Investment and Cash Flow Relationship Revisited.” World Development 37(5): 953 – 964, 2009. 
16. “Volatility of Short Term Capital Flows and Private Investment in Emerging Markets.” Journal of Development Studies 45(5): 672 – 692, 2009. 
17. “Financialization and Manufacturing Firm Profitability under Uncertainty and Macroeconomic Volatility: Evidence from an Emerging Market.” Review of Development Economics 13(4): 592 – 609, 2009. 
18. “Macroeconomic Uncertainty and Private Investment in Argentina, Mexico and Turkey.” Applied Economics Letters 16(6): 567 – 571, 2009. 
19. “South-South Trade in Manufactures: Current Performance and Obstacles for Growth.” Review of Radical Political Economics 40(3): 266 – 275, 2008 (with O.S. Dahi). 
20. “The Rise of Rentier Capitalism and the Financialization of Real Sectors in Developing Countries.” Review of Radical Political Economics 39(3): 351 – 359, 2007. 
• Translated (in Turkish) and reprinted in Mulkiye Dergisi 257: 25 – 35, 2007.
21. “Militarization of the Market and Rent Seeking Coalitions in Turkey.” Development and Change 36(4): 667 – 690, 2005.
22. “A Failure Story: Politics and Financial Liberalization in Turkey, Revisiting the Revolving Door Hypothesis.” World Development 32(5): 851 – 869, 2004.

Publications in Edited Books
23. “Büyük İstikrar Döneminden Büyük Durgunluk Dönemine: Krizdeki Kapitalizm veya Kriz Kapitalizmi (From the Great Moderation to the Great Recession: Capitalism in Crisis or Crisis Capitalism).” In C. Bakir, Z. Onis, and F. Senses (Eds.), Küresel Ekonomik Kriz Sonrasında Yeni Dünya Düzeni (The New World Order after the Global Economic Crisis) (pp. 119-142). Iletisim, 2013.
24. “Labor Market Performance after Structural Adjustment in Developing Countries: The Interesting but not so Unique Case of Turkey.” In L.K. Valencia and B.J. Hahn (Eds.), Employment and Labor Issues: Unemployment, Youth Employment and Child Labor (pp.1 – 37). Nova Science Publishers, 2010 (with N. Erdem).
25. “A Political Economy Analysis of the Turkish Military’s Split Personality: The Patriarchal Master or Crony Capitalist?” In T. Cetin and F. Yilmaz (Eds.), Understanding the Process of Economic Change in Turkey: An Institutional Approach (pp.159 – 181). Nova Science Publishers, 2010. 
26. “Turkish Post-Crisis Development Experience from a Comparative Perspective: Structural Break of Business as Usual?” In Z. Önis and F. Senses (Eds.), Turkish Economy in the Post-Crisis Era: The New Phase of Neo-Liberal Restructuring and Integration to the Global Economy (pp.11 – 33). Routledge, 2009. 
27. “Volatility of Short Term Capital Flows and Socio-Political Instability in Developing Countries: A Review.” In T.N. Caldeira (Ed.), Economics of Developing Countries (pp.53 – 77). Nova Science Publishers, 2009.
28. “Economic Development and the Fabrication of the Middle East as a Eurocentric Project.” In R.K. Kanth (Ed.) The Challenge of Eurocentrism (pp.63 – 82). MacMillan, 2009 (with F. Kaboub).
29. “The Middle East and North Africa.” In A.K. Dutt and J. Ros (Eds.), International Handbook of Development Economics (pp.522 – 535). Edward Elgar, 2008 (with O.S. Dahi). 
30. “Value Creation in Acquisitions: Privatization of Turk Telekom.” In H.F. Ulrich and E.P. Lehrmann (Eds.), Telecommunications Research Trends (pp.107 – 126). Nova Science Publishers, 2008 (with V.B. Uysal).
Publications in Policy Journals
31. “Erdogan’s War.” Foreign Policy, March 18, 2016. 
32. “Ankara Blues: Yet More Bombings, Reflections on the Cheapness of life in Turkey.” The Globalist, October 13, 2015. 
33. “Turkey’s Enemy Within.” Foreign Policy, January 23, 2014.
34. “Why the Protests in Turkey make me Optimistic about the Future of Democracy.” Foreign Policy, June 6, 2013. 
35. “Here is What You Need to Know about the Clashes in Turkey.” Foreign Policy, June 1, 2013. 

Other Publications
36. “From Islamic Renaissance to Neo-Fascism in Turkey.” Review of Middle East Studies 50(2): 1-9, 2017. 
37. “The Rise of the South: Essays in South-South Trade and Finance.” Latin American Council of Social Sciences, Buenos Aires: CLASCO, 2015 (with O.S. Dahi).

Eric Heinze
Professor, Associate Chair
Department of International and Area Studies

Research
International relations, international law and institutions, ethics and IR

My research deals with ethical and legal issues in international relations with a focus on international norms pertaining to armed conflict, human rights, and genocide and mass atrocity. My current and recent work is on humanitarian intervention, the Responsibility to Protect, international law and non-state armed groups, and the law and ethics of cyber operations.

Selected Publications
Brent J. Steele and Eric A. Heinze, eds., Routledge Handbook of Ethics and International Relations (London: Routledge, 2018).

Eric A. Heinze, Global Violence: Ethical and Political Issues (London: Routledge, 2016).

Eric A. Heinze, “Failed Interventions and the Inherent Contradictions of Liberal Internationalism,” in Aidan Hehir and Robert Murray, eds., Protecting Human Rights in the 21st Century (Routledge, 2017).

Current Projects

  • Article manuscript: "The Return of Reprisals in the Law and Ethics of Armed Conflict"
  • Article manuscript: "The Legal Implications of targeting ISIL with Armed Force"
  • Preliminary stages: "The Ethics of Mandatory Military Service"
  • Preliminary stages: "Domestic Politics and Atrocity Response in Darfur and Myanmar"

Mark Raymond
Wick Cary Assistant Professor of International Security
Department of International and Area Studies

Research
International System

Mark Raymond (@MRaymondonIR) is the Wick Cary Assistant Professor of International Security and Director of the Cyber Governance and Policy Center at the University of Oklahoma. He is a Carnegie Fellow at the School of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University, an External Affiliate of the Ostrom Workshop at Indiana University, and a Fellow with the Center for Democracy and Technology. He is the author of Social Practices of Rule-Making in World Politics (New York: Oxford University Press, 2019). His work appears in various academic journals including International Theory, Strategic Studies Quarterly, The Cyber Defense Review, the UC Davis Law Review, and the Georgetown Journal of International Affairs. He has testified before the United Nations Commission on Science and Technology for Development, and participated in the Internet Governance Forum. His current research projects examine the politics of global rule-making, as well as Internet governance and cybersecurity governance.

Selected Publications

Social Practices of Rule-Making in World Politics (New York: Oxford University Press, 2019).

“Cyber Futures and the Justice Motive: Avoiding Pyrrhic Victory,” Military Cyber Affairs 3.1 (2018): 1-23.

“The Internet of Things as a Global Policy Frontier,” UC Davis Law Review 51.2 (2017): 475-497 (with Laura DeNardis).

“Managing Decentralized Cyber Governance: The Responsibility to Troubleshoot,” Strategic Studies Quarterly 10.4 (2016): 123-149.

“Engaging Security and Intelligence Practitioners in the Emerging Cyber Regime Complex,” The Cyber Defense Review 1.2 (2016): 81-94.

“Multistakeholderism: Anatomy of an Inchoate Global Institution,” International Theory 7.3 (2015): 572-616 (with Laura DeNardis).

“Puncturing the Myth of the Internet as a Commons,” Georgetown Journal of International Affairs International Engagement on Cyber III (2013-14): 53-64.

“Renovating the Procedural Architecture of International Law,” Canadian Foreign Policy Journal 19.3 (2013): 268-287.

Natalie Letsa
Wick Cary Assistant Professor of Political Economy
Department of International and Area Studies

Research
Cameroon, Sub-Saharan Africa, Autocratic Regimes

Natalie Letsa is a political scientist and the Wick Cary Assistant Professor of Political Economy in the Department of International and Area Studies at the University of Oklahoma.  Her work focuses on public opinion and political behavior in authoritarian regimes, primarily in sub-Saharan Africa. She is also interested in macro-issues of regime stability and legitimization in non-democratic and transitioning regimes. In the 2018/19 academic year, she will be a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law at Stanford University. She teaches classes on the political economy of development, African politics, and authoritarianism.  Her work has appeared in or is forthcoming at Comparative Politics, The Journal of Modern African Studies, and Democratization. Her current book project, The Autocratic Voter: Understanding Partisanship and Electoral Behavior under Authoritarianism, investigates why people choose to vote in non-competitive elections. In preparation of the manuscript, she spent 2014/15 in Cameroon conducting an original national public opinion survey in order to explore how and why people choose to engage in elections that never result in electoral turnover.    Dr. Letsa received her B.A. in Political Science from Reed College in 2009, and her Ph.D. in Government from Cornell University in 2017.

Selected Publications

2018. “Popular Support for Democracy in Autocratic Regimes: A Micro-Level Analysis of Preferences” (with Martha Wilfahrt). Comparative Politics 50 (2).

2017. “‘The People’s Choice’: Popular (Il)Legitimacy in Autocratic Cameroon”  Journal of Modern African Studies 55 (4), 647-679.  

2017. “Voting for Peace, Mobilizing for War: Post-Conflict Voter Turnout and Civil War Recurrence.” Democratization 24 (3), p. 425-443.  

Rita Kerestztesi
Associate Professor
Department of English

Research
Africa and African Diaspora Studies

Rita Keresztesi specializes in the study of the literary, political and cultural production of the African Diaspora. She has published articles on the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Power movement, Afro-Caribbean culture, and postcolonial West African cinema. She was a Fulbright Scholar at the University of Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso in 2010-2011. She is a Fulbright Alumni Ambassador, see: https://www.cies.org/alumni-ambassadors/rita-keresztesi. She is also active in OU’s Education Abroad summer programs: she led courses on film in Arezzo, Italy, Clermont-Ferrand, France, and twice in Tanzania/Zanzibar for the Journey to Africa program.

Selected Publications
The Western in the Global South (co-editor) (Routledge, 2015) Strangers at Home: American Ethnic Modernism between the World Wars (Nebraska UP, 2005)

Andreana Prichard
Wick Cary Associate Professor of Honors and African History
Honors College

Research
East Africa

Dr. Prichard is an historian of nineteenth and twentieth century East Africa. In particular, she is interested in the intersections of gender, religion, and politics. Her book, Sisters in Spirit: Christianity, Affect, and Community Building in East Africa, 1860-1960, was released in 2017 with Michigan State University Press. The book uses the rich personal stories of a group of female African lay evangelists to tell an intimate history of the Universities' Mission to Central Africa, and of the Tanzanian nation. Prichard's current research project deals with the history of evangelical child sponsorship initiatives in East Africa and the American Bible Belt.

Selected Publications
Sisters in Spirit: Christianity, Affect, and Community Building in East Africa, 1860-1960

Articles in publications such as The Journal of African History and Women's Studies Review

Katerina Tsetsura
Associate Professor
Gaylord College of Journalism and Mass Communications

Research
Europe (Finland, Spain, Ukraine, Russia, etc.); South Pacific Asia; exploring connections with S. America

My research interests are closely aligned with global strategic communication. In short, I study how strategic communication helps to shape knowledge societies in transition. My research crosses boundaries and addresses issues in global and intercultural advertising, public relations, and strategic communication, mass media ethics, and business and strategic management. My scholarship examines cultural, political, economic, and societal influences on strategic communication practice and the ethical dimensions of this professionalized occupation in different nations and global regions. As part of my decade-long media transparency research project, I examine, from multiple perspectives, global advertising, public relations, and journalism practices throughout the world.   My primary research area that investigates how global media transparency defines public relations-media interactions assumes the disclosure of all sources and possible influences on the news in the media. Thus, media non-transparency, or media opacity, is defined as any form of payment for news coverage or any influence on editorial decisions that is not explicitly indicated in the finished product of the media, such as a journalistic report, an article, or a program. I explore media transparency from the perspectives of global and international journalism and public relations ethics and from socially constructed media relations practices worldwide.   My other recent research project focused on the role and functions of media-related NGOs and independent media development in countries having transitional regimes. In 2011-2012, I conducted an extensive research in Ukraine to study independent media development as part of the global Media Map Project, which was sponsored by the Melinda and Bill Gates Foundation and was supported by the World Bank Foundation. I conducted additional research on the subject in 2015 as part of the USAID evaluation of the Ukraine Media project. In 2017, I worked on the evaluation and measurement research team to evaluate the continuing development of civil society in Ukraine.   Recently, I completed the research project on identifying global capabilities for public relations. I led the U.S. research team in this global project that spanned nine countries to develop the global capability framework for public relations and communications management. This two-year research project (2016-2018), supported by the Global Alliance for Public Relations and Communication Management (GA), designed the framework for professional bodies and practitioners around the world and serves as a research to influence 21st Century curricula.  

See my curriculum vitae here.

Selected Publications

Tsetsura, K., & Aziz, K. (2018). Toward professional standards for media transparency in the United States: Comparison of perceptions of non-transparency in national vs. regional media. Public Relations Review, 44(1), 180-190.  Online first: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0363811117301030   Nguyen, T., &Tsetsura, K. (2017). Gift-giving and media transparency in Vietnam.  PR Journal, 1. (A special issue: Public Relations Practices in Asia). Retrieved from http://prjournal.instituteforpr.org/wp-content/uploads/04GiftGivingCultureinVietnam.pdf  Tsetsura, K., & Valentini, C. (2016). The “holy” triad in media ethics:  A conceptual model for understanding global media ethics.  Public Relations Review, 42(4), 573-581.   Tsetsura, K. (2015). Ukrainian NGOs as opinion makers: How media organizations communicate about progress in new democracy with western donors. Tripodos, 37, 91-110.  Boldonova, I., & Tsetsura, K. (2015). Volunteering movement in Russia: Regional presence and future perspectives. Styles of Communication, 7(1), 7-22. [Lead article]  Tsetsura, K. (2015). Guanxi, gift-giving, or bribery? Ethical considerations of paid news in China. Public Relations Journal, 9(2). Retrieved from  https://www.prsa.org/Intelligence/PRJournal/Documents/2015v09n02Tsetsura.pdf   Klyueva, A., & Tsetsura, K. (2015).  Economic foundations of morality:  Questions of transparency and ethics in Russian journalism. Central European Journal of Communication, 8(1). Retrieved from http://ptks.pl/cejc/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/03-kluyeva.pdf    Uysal, N., & Tsetsura, K. (2015). Corporate governance on stakeholder issues: Shareholder activism as a guiding force. Journal of Public Affairs, 15(2), 210-219.  DOI: 10.1002/pa.1529. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/pa.1529/abstract   Tsetsura, K., Bentley, J., & Newcomb, T. (2015). Idealistic and conflicted: New portrayals of public relations practitioners in film. Public Relations Review, 41(5), 652-661.   Tsetsura, K. (2014). Constructing public relations as a women’s profession. Revista Internacional de Relaciones Públicas: International Journal of Public Relations, 4(8), 85-110. [Special Issue on European Public Relations]. Retrieved from http://revistarelacionespublicas.uma.es/index.php/revrrpp/article/view/293/178     Tsetsura, K. (2013). Challenges in framing women’s rights as human rights at the domestic level: A case study of NGOs in the post-Soviet countries. Public Relations Review, 39, 406-416.   Tsetsura, K. (2012). A struggle for legitimacy: Russian women secure their professional identities in public relations in a hyper-sexualized patriarchal workplace. Public Relations Journal, 6(1). Retrieved from http://www.prsa.org/Intelligence/PRJournal/Documents/2012Tsetsura.pdf    Chernov, G., & Tsetsura, K. (2012). Building a bridge between corporate reputation and corporate social responsibility in the Ukrainian print media. International Journal of Emerging Markets, 7(2), 132-145. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?articleid=17026341&ini=aob   Klyueva, A., & Tsetsura, K. (2011). News from the Urals with love and payment: The first look at non-transparent media practices in the Urals Federal District of Russia. Russian Journal of Communication, 4(1/2), 72-93.  Tsetsura, K. (2011). How understanding multidimensional diversity can benefit global public relations education. Public Relations Review, 37(5), 530-535. [Special issue on public relations pedagogy; winner of the 2012 NCA PRIDE Award]   Tsetsura, K. (2011). Is public relations a real job? How female practitioners construct the profession. Journal of Public Relations Research, 23(1), 1-23. [Lead article]  Tsetsura, K.  (2010). How female practitioners in Moscow view their profession: A pilot study. Public Relations Review, 36, 78-80.  Tsetsura, K. (2010). Performing thyself: Sparking imagination and exploring ethnic identity. The Journal for Learning through the Arts: A Research Journal on Arts Integration in Schools and Communities, 6(1). Retrieved from http://escholarship.org/uc/item/974542b5   Tsetsura, K., & Luoma-aho, V. (2010). Innovative thinking or distortion of journalistic values? How the lack of trust creates non-transparency in the Russian media. Ethical Space: The International Journal of Communication Ethics, 7(4), 30-38.  Klyueva, A., & Tsetsura, K. (2010). Media non-transparency research: A Case of Romania. Public Relations Journal, 4(4). Retrieved from http://www.prsa.org/Intelligence/PRJournal/Documents/2010FallKlyuevaTsetsura.pdf   Tsetsura, K., & Chernov, G. (2009). Constructing corporate reputation in the Russian media. Russian Journal of Communication, 2(1-2), 46-65.  Tsetsura, K., & Grynko, A. (2009). An exploratory study of the media transparency in Ukraine. Public Relations Journal, 3(2). Retrieved from http://www.prsa.org/SearchResults/download/6D-030205/0/An_Exploratory_Study_of_the_Media_Transparency_in  Tsetsura, K., & Kruckeberg, D. (2009). Corporate reputation: Beyond measurement. Public Relations Journal, 3(3). Retrieved from http://www.prsa.org/SearchResults/download/6D-030303/0/Corporate_Reputation_Beyond_Measuremen  [Named among the Top Five Papers Published in PR Journal in 2009]  Tsetsura, K. (2008). An exploratory study of global media relations practices. Institute for Public Relations Research Reports: International Research. Retrieved from http://www.instituteforpr.org/global-media-relations-practices-2008/  Kruckeberg, D., & Tsetsura, K. (2008). The Chicago school in global community: Concept explication for communication theories and practices. Asian Communication Research, 5, 9-30. [Lead article]  Tsetsura, K. (2005). Bribery for news coverage: Research in Poland. Institute for Public Relations Online: International Research. Retrieved from http://www.instituteforpr.org/bribery-poland-2005/   Kruckeberg, D., Tsetsura, K., & Ovaitt, F. (2005). International index of media bribery. In The Global Corruption Report 2005: Transparency International (pp. 258-261). London: Pluto Press.  Kruckeberg, D., & Tsetsura, K. (2003). International index of bribery for news coverage: A composite index by country of variables related to the likelihood of the existence of “cash for news coverage.” Institute for Public Relations Online: International Research. Retrieved from http://www.instituteforpr.org/bribery-news-coverage-2003/  

Alexander Jabbari
Farzaneh Family Assistant Professor of Persian Language and Literature
Department of International and Area Studies

Research
Iran and India

Persian was once the lingua franca of a broad region stretching from the Balkans in the west to China in the east, an area now referred to by scholars as the "Persianate world." My research is concerned with how intellectuals throughout the Persianate world sought to modernize their shared literary heritage. I work primarily on Persian and Urdu, but also draw from source material in Arabic and Turkish, as well as European languages. Methodologically, my work lies at the intersection of history, literary studies, and philology.

I am currently working on a monograph about how modernizers in Iran and India reworked Persianate materials to produce the genre of Persian literary history. I also have a number of articles in preparation dealing with various aspects of modernizing the Persianate world, including Urdu-Persian translation in Afghanistan and Iran, Persian literature in China, and Persian digital humanities.

Selected Publications
“The Making of Modernity in Persianate Literary History,” Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa, and the Middle East 36:3 (December 2016): 418-434

“Race, Modernity, and Temporality in Dear Uncle Napoleon.” In Persian Literature Unbound, ed. Nasrin Rahimieh. Irvine: Samuel Jordan Center for Persian Studies (forthcoming)

Zoe Sherinian
Professor of Ethnomusicology
School of Music

Research
South Asia

Zoe Sherinian is Professor of Ethnomusicology and Division Chair at the University of Oklahoma. She has published the book Tamil Folk Music as Dalit Liberation Theology (Indian Univ. Press 2014), articles on the Dalit parai frame drum in the journal Interpretation (2017), and articles on the indigenization of Christianity in Ethnomusicology (2007), The World of Music (2005), and Women and Music (2005). She has also produced and directed two documentary films: This is A Music: Reclaiming an Untouchable Drum (2011), on the changing status of Dalit (outcaste) drummers in India, and Sakthi Vibrations (2018), on the use of Tamil folk arts to develop self-esteem in young Dalit women at the Sakthi Folk Cultural Centre. She is presently writing a book entitled Drumming Our Liberation: The Spiritual, Cultural, and Sonic Power of the Parai Drum. She is also an active musician who performs and conducts trainings in the parai drum. She has extensively studied the mrdangam, the classical drum of South Indian Karnatak music, and performs on the jazz drumset. She has also performed with the Balinese Gamelan, Sekar Jaya, and several university based steel drum and African drumming ensembles. In 2009, Sherinian began the first parai (Indian folk) drumming ensemble in the U.S. at the University of Oklahoma and teaches drumset for the Girls Rock and Roll camp of Oklahoma City.

Sherinian’s research engages the intersectional relationship between caste, class, gender and music in South Asia as well as the historical and contemporary use of music to indigenize Christian ritual and theology. Her strengths include theoretical attention to the intersectionality of race, class, gender, caste and religion; a South Asia area studies concentration with focus on art, religion and politics; a secondary focus in African American music; ethnomusicological fieldwork praxis based in applied ethnomusicology, phenomenology, and participatory documentary filmmaking; as well as historically grounded research on cross-cultural religious contact and the resulting agency of oppressed people in the production of music. She also has strengths in gender and queer theory, and applies feminist analysis from global and anthropological perspectives to most of her work.

Selected Publications

Sakthi Vibrations. Ethnomusicological documentary. Edited by Sundance Fellow, Jeffrey Palmer. 2018
Making Congregational Music Local in Christian Communities Worldwide. Co-Editor
with Monique M. Ingalls and Muriel Swijghuisen Reigersberg, Routledge 2018.
“Religious Encounters: Empowerment Through Tamil Outcaste Folk Drumming.” Interpretation:
A Journal of Bible and Theology. Vol. 70, No.1. Sage. January 2017: 64-79. Pub. with video examples
“Songs of Ora Olai: The Praxis of Alternative Dalit Christian Modernities.” The Oxford Handbook
of Music and World Christianities, Edited by Jonathan Dueck and Suzel Reily. 2016: 269-290.
Handbook of Applied Ethnomusicology, Oxford University Press. Edited by Jeff Titon and
Svanibor Pettan, “Activist Ethnomusicology and Marginalized Musics of South Asia.” 2015. 
Tamil Folk Music as Dalit Liberation Theology, Indiana Univ. Press, Jan. 2014
Includes 50 clips of on-line annotated media. 
This is a Music: Reclaiming an Untouchable Drum, Ethnomusicological Documentary Film. 
World Premiere deadCENTER Film Festival, Oklahoma City, June 2011. 
“Changing Status in India’s Marginal Music Communities.” Religious Compass, Blackwell-
Compass Online Peer Reviewed Journal. Vol. 4, June 2009. With accompanying video file. 
“Musical Style and the Changing Social Identity of Tamil Christians.” Ethnomusicology, vol. 51,
no. 2, Spring/Summer 2007: 238-280.
“Re-presenting Dalit Feminist Politics Through Dialogical Musical Ethnography,” Women
and Music, Vol. 9. 2005: 1-12.
“The Indigenization of Tamil Christian Music: Musical Style and Liberation Theology.” 
The World of Music. Edited by Max Peter Baumann, Guest Edited by T. M. Scruggs. 
Berlin, Germany. Vol. 47 no. 1. 2005: 125-165.
“Dalit Theology in Tamil Christian Folk Music: A Transformative Liturgy by James Theophilus
Appavoo.” Popular Christianity in India: Riting Between the Lines, Eds. Selva J. Raj and Corinne
Dempsey. Albany: SUNY Press 2002: 233-253.

My works that might be of most interest are the following book and two films: 
Book
Tamil Folk Music as Dalit Liberation Theology, Indiana Univ. Press, Jan. 2014
Includes 50 clips of on-line annotated media. 

Films
This is a Music: Reclaiming an Untouchable Drum, Ethnomusicological Documentary Film. 
World Premiere deadCENTER Film Festival, Oklahoma City, June 2011.

Sakthi Vibrations. Ethnomusicological documentary. Edited by Sundance Fellow, Jeffrey Palmer. 2018

Peter Barker
Professor
Department of the History of Science

Research
Early Modern Europe, Safavid Persia and Mughal India

I am currently working on a book about celestial orbs (see the preliminary web site here), and doing research to undermine the thesis that science in the Islamic world declined after the thirteenth century.

Selected Publications
Barker, P. (2017) “The Social Structure of Islamicate Science” Journal of World Philosophies, 3, 37-47. Barker, P. and Heidarzadeh, T. (2016) “Copernicus, the Ṭūsī couple and East-West Exchange in the Fifteenth Century” in M. A. Grenada and P. Boner (eds.) Man and Cosmos (Barcelona: University of Barcelona Press), 19-57. Crowther, K. and Barker, P. (2013)  “Training the Intelligent Eye: Understanding Illustrations in Early Modern Astronomy Texts. “ Isis, 104, 429-70. Barker, P. (2013a) “Why was Copernicus a Copernican?” Metascience, 22, 1-6.  

Aquil Shah
Assistant Professor
Department of International and Area Studies

Research
South Asia, Pakistan

Civil-military relations, democratic transitions, civil society, strategic effects of drone warfare

Selected Publications

The Army and Democracy: Military Politics in Pakistan (Harvard University Press, 2014).

“Assessing Blowback from U.S. Drone Strikes: Pakistan & Beyond,” International Security, 42.4 (Spring 2018), pp. 47-84.

“The Dog That Did Not Bark: The Indian Army and the Emergency,” Commonwealth and Comparative Politics, 55.1 (2017), pp. 1-19.   

“Democracy Deadlocked in Bangladesh,” Current History, (April 2016), pp. 130-136.   

“States, Organizations, and War-making: Pakistan in Comparative Perspective,” Review Essay, Perspectives on Politics, 13.4 (December 2015), 1-10.  

“Constraining Consolidation: Military Politics and Democracy in Pakistan,” Democratization, 21.6 (2014), 1007-1033.  

“Getting the Military Out of Pakistani Politics: How Aiding the Army Undermines Democracy,” Foreign Affairs (Fall 2011), pp. 69-82.

“Bringing State Institutions Back In,” in Matthew McCartney and Akbar Zaidi, eds., Rethinking the Political Economy of Pakistan: State, Civil Society and Social Classes (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming).  

"Civil-Military Relations in South Asia," in Sumit Ganguly, Andrew Scobell and Joseph Liow, eds., The Handbook of Asian Security Studies (Routledge, 2017).  

"The Military," in Christophe Jaffrelot, ed., Pakistan at the Cross Roads (Columbia University Press, April 2016).  

“Security, Soldiers and the State,” in Stephen P. Cohen, ed., The Future of Pakistan (Brookings Press, 2011), 199-214.   

Elyssa Faison
L.R. Brammer Jr Presidential Professor, Associate Professor
History Department

Research
Japan

Research-in-Progress
Atomic Memories: Legacies of the Cold War in the Japan and the United States (monograph)
Resisting the Nuclear: Art and Activism Across the Pacific (edited volume, co-edited with Alison Fields, projected publication 2020)
Socialism, Feminism and the State in Twentieth-Century Japan: A Biography of Yamakawa Kikue (monograph)

Publications
Books
Managing Women: Disciplining Labor in Modern Japan (University of California Press, 2007)

Edited Books
Gender and Labour in Korea and Japan: Sexing Class, edited by Ruth Barraclough and Elyssa Faison (RoutledgeCurzon “Women in Asia” series, 2009)

Essays in Edited Books
“Women’s Rights as Proletarian Rights: Yamakawa Kikue, Suffrage Rights, and the ‘Dawn of Liberation’”, in Rethinking Modern Japanese Feminisms, edited by Julia Bullock, Ayako Kano and James Welker (University of Hawaii Press, forthcoming 2018)
“Tokyo Twilight: Alienation, Belonging and the Fractured Family,” in Ozu International: Essays on the Global Influences of a Japanese Auteur, edited by Marc DiPaolo and Wayne Stein (New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2015)
“Introduction: The Entanglement of Sexual and Industrial Labour” (co-authored, pp. 1-9), and “Gender and Korean Labour in Wartime Japan” (pp. 27-43), in Gender and Labour in Korea and Japan: Sexing Class, edited by Ruth Barraclough and Elyssa Faison (RoutledgeCurzon, 2009)

Peter Barker
Professor
Department of the History of Science

Research
Early Modern Europe, Safavid Persia and Mughal India

I am currently working on a book about celestial orbs (see the preliminary web site here), and doing research to undermine the thesis that science in the Islamic world declined after the thirteenth century.

Selected Publications
Barker, P. (2017) “The Social Structure of Islamicate Science” Journal of World Philosophies, 3, 37-47. Barker, P. and Heidarzadeh, T. (2016) “Copernicus, the Ṭūsī couple and East-West Exchange in the Fifteenth Century” in M. A. Grenada and P. Boner (eds.) Man and Cosmos (Barcelona: University of Barcelona Press), 19-57. Crowther, K. and Barker, P. (2013)  “Training the Intelligent Eye: Understanding Illustrations in Early Modern Astronomy Texts. “ Isis, 104, 429-70. Barker, P. (2013a) “Why was Copernicus a Copernican?” Metascience, 22, 1-6.  

Jill Irvine
Presedentail Professor of International and Area Studies
Department of International and Area Studies

Research
Europe and Southeastern Europe

My teaching and research interests include social movements, political mobilization, and transnational activism, with a focus on gender. More recent work has focused on ethno-religious movements and democratic transformations in Eastern Europe.

Selected Publications
(2013-2018)

Books:
Gendered Mobilization: Intersectional Challenges in Social Movements in North America and Europe (with Celeste Montoya and Sabine Lang, eds.) under contract, Rowman & Littlefield, anticipated publication fall 2018

Natalija, Life in the Balkan Powderkeg, 1880-1956, (with Carol S. Lilly, ed.), Central European University Press, 2008

State-Society Relations in Yugoslavia, 1945-1992, (with Melissa Bokovoy, and Carol S. Lilly, eds.), St. Martin's Press, 1997

The Croatian Question: Partisan Politics in the Formation of the Yugoslav Socialist State. Westview Press, 1995

Peer Reviewed Book Chapters and Journal Articles:

Funding Empowerment: U.S. Foundations and Global Gender Equality," Politics & Gender (2018) https://doi.org/10.1017/S1743923X18000314

"US Aid and Gender Equality: Social Movement vs. Civil Society Models of Funding," Democratization (2018) 

"The Queer Work of Militarized Prides in the Balkans," (with Janice Irvine) Contexts Fall 2017

"Trends in Comparative Research on Politics and Gender," (with Cindy Simon Rosenthal), Comparative Politics Newsletter, American Political Science Association, vol.27, issue 1, spring 2017

"Gender Equality in Croatia: Closing the Compliance Gap," in Gender Equality and Gender Politics in Southeastern Europe, a Question of Justice, Sabrina P. Ramet and Christine M. Hassenstab eds., Palgrave Press, 2015

"Bounded Altruism: INGO Behavior during Humanitarian Crises and US Interventions in the Balkans," (with Andrew Halterman), East European Politics, August 2014 

"Negotiating Interests: Women and Nationalism in Serbia and Croatia 1990-1997," (with Carol Lilly) reprinted in" Women in Transition, Irena Grodinska and Andrzej Tymmowski, eds., Peter Lang, Internationaler Verlag der Wissenschaften, 2013

"Leveraging Change: Women's Organizing and the Implementation of UNSCR 1325 in the Balkans," reprinted in Gender, Governance, and International Security, Nicola Pratt and Sophie Richter-Devroe, eds., Routledge Press, 2013

"Electoral Breakthroughs in Croatia and Serbia: Women's Organizing and International Assistance," Communist and Post-Communist Studies 46 (2013) 

"From International Courts to Grassroots Organizing: Obstacles to Transitional Justice in the Balkans," (with Patrice McMahon), Transitional Justice and Civil Society in the Balkans, Olivera Simic and Zala Volcic, eds., Springer Press, January 2013

"Leveraging Change: Women's Organizations and the Implementation of UNSCR 1325 in the Balkans," International Feminist Journal of Politics 15 1 2013

Daniel Simon
Assistant Director and Editor in Chief
World Literature Today

Research
France

The Musée Arthur Rimbaud in Charleville-Mézières, France, is preparing an exhibition of prints, drawings, paintings, and livres d’artiste by contemporary artists and translator-poets devoted to Rimbaud’s famous poem, "Le Bateau ivre." They asked me to do a new translation of the poem, which will be featured in a livre d'artiste that includes my translation. The exhibition will open in mid-October 2018 and continue through January 2019.

Selected Publications
A dozen of my own poems have been translated into French and will appear in Le Journal des Poètes, an esteemed publication from Belgium, in 2019. I've also translated a number of French, Spanish, and Polish writers for World Literature Today: Joanna Pollakówna (from French; 2017), Zofia Romanowicz (from French; 2016), five Spanish poets (2015), Abdellah Taïa (2013), Boualem Sansal (2012), Tahar Ben Jelloun (2009), Christine Montalbetti (2008), Assia Djebar (2006), and Claude Michel Cluny (2005).

Peter Kutner
Hugh Roff Professor of Law
College of Law

Research
Britain and Commonwealth

Law in common law and "mixed" legal systems.  Primary subjects tort law and private international law/conflict of laws.

Selected Publications
Monographs and journal articles, primarily on subjects of tort law and private international law/conflict of laws.

Katerina Tsetsura
Associate Professor
Gaylord College of Journalism and Mass Communications

Research
Europe (Finland, Spain, Ukraine, Russia, etc.); South Pacific Asia; exploring connections with S. America

My research interests are closely aligned with global strategic communication. In short, I study how strategic communication helps to shape knowledge societies in transition. My research crosses boundaries and addresses issues in global and intercultural advertising, public relations, and strategic communication, mass media ethics, and business and strategic management. My scholarship examines cultural, political, economic, and societal influences on strategic communication practice and the ethical dimensions of this professionalized occupation in different nations and global regions. As part of my decade-long media transparency research project, I examine, from multiple perspectives, global advertising, public relations, and journalism practices throughout the world.   My primary research area that investigates how global media transparency defines public relations-media interactions assumes the disclosure of all sources and possible influences on the news in the media. Thus, media non-transparency, or media opacity, is defined as any form of payment for news coverage or any influence on editorial decisions that is not explicitly indicated in the finished product of the media, such as a journalistic report, an article, or a program. I explore media transparency from the perspectives of global and international journalism and public relations ethics and from socially constructed media relations practices worldwide.   My other recent research project focused on the role and functions of media-related NGOs and independent media development in countries having transitional regimes. In 2011-2012, I conducted an extensive research in Ukraine to study independent media development as part of the global Media Map Project, which was sponsored by the Melinda and Bill Gates Foundation and was supported by the World Bank Foundation. I conducted additional research on the subject in 2015 as part of the USAID evaluation of the Ukraine Media project. In 2017, I worked on the evaluation and measurement research team to evaluate the continuing development of civil society in Ukraine.   Recently, I completed the research project on identifying global capabilities for public relations. I led the U.S. research team in this global project that spanned nine countries to develop the global capability framework for public relations and communications management. This two-year research project (2016-2018), supported by the Global Alliance for Public Relations and Communication Management (GA), designed the framework for professional bodies and practitioners around the world and serves as a research to influence 21st Century curricula.  

See my curriculum vitae here.

Selected Publications

Tsetsura, K., & Aziz, K. (2018). Toward professional standards for media transparency in the United States: Comparison of perceptions of non-transparency in national vs. regional media. Public Relations Review, 44(1), 180-190.  Online first: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0363811117301030   Nguyen, T., &Tsetsura, K. (2017). Gift-giving and media transparency in Vietnam.  PR Journal, 1. (A special issue: Public Relations Practices in Asia). Retrieved from http://prjournal.instituteforpr.org/wp-content/uploads/04GiftGivingCultureinVietnam.pdf  Tsetsura, K., & Valentini, C. (2016). The “holy” triad in media ethics:  A conceptual model for understanding global media ethics.  Public Relations Review, 42(4), 573-581.   Tsetsura, K. (2015). Ukrainian NGOs as opinion makers: How media organizations communicate about progress in new democracy with western donors. Tripodos, 37, 91-110.  Boldonova, I., & Tsetsura, K. (2015). Volunteering movement in Russia: Regional presence and future perspectives. Styles of Communication, 7(1), 7-22. [Lead article]  Tsetsura, K. (2015). Guanxi, gift-giving, or bribery? Ethical considerations of paid news in China. Public Relations Journal, 9(2). Retrieved from  https://www.prsa.org/Intelligence/PRJournal/Documents/2015v09n02Tsetsura.pdf   Klyueva, A., & Tsetsura, K. (2015).  Economic foundations of morality:  Questions of transparency and ethics in Russian journalism. Central European Journal of Communication, 8(1). Retrieved from http://ptks.pl/cejc/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/03-kluyeva.pdf    Uysal, N., & Tsetsura, K. (2015). Corporate governance on stakeholder issues: Shareholder activism as a guiding force. Journal of Public Affairs, 15(2), 210-219.  DOI: 10.1002/pa.1529. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/pa.1529/abstract   Tsetsura, K., Bentley, J., & Newcomb, T. (2015). Idealistic and conflicted: New portrayals of public relations practitioners in film. Public Relations Review, 41(5), 652-661.   Tsetsura, K. (2014). Constructing public relations as a women’s profession. Revista Internacional de Relaciones Públicas: International Journal of Public Relations, 4(8), 85-110. [Special Issue on European Public Relations]. Retrieved from http://revistarelacionespublicas.uma.es/index.php/revrrpp/article/view/293/178     Tsetsura, K. (2013). Challenges in framing women’s rights as human rights at the domestic level: A case study of NGOs in the post-Soviet countries. Public Relations Review, 39, 406-416.   Tsetsura, K. (2012). A struggle for legitimacy: Russian women secure their professional identities in public relations in a hyper-sexualized patriarchal workplace. Public Relations Journal, 6(1). Retrieved from http://www.prsa.org/Intelligence/PRJournal/Documents/2012Tsetsura.pdf    Chernov, G., & Tsetsura, K. (2012). Building a bridge between corporate reputation and corporate social responsibility in the Ukrainian print media. International Journal of Emerging Markets, 7(2), 132-145. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?articleid=17026341&ini=aob   Klyueva, A., & Tsetsura, K. (2011). News from the Urals with love and payment: The first look at non-transparent media practices in the Urals Federal District of Russia. Russian Journal of Communication, 4(1/2), 72-93.  Tsetsura, K. (2011). How understanding multidimensional diversity can benefit global public relations education. Public Relations Review, 37(5), 530-535. [Special issue on public relations pedagogy; winner of the 2012 NCA PRIDE Award]   Tsetsura, K. (2011). Is public relations a real job? How female practitioners construct the profession. Journal of Public Relations Research, 23(1), 1-23. [Lead article]  Tsetsura, K.  (2010). How female practitioners in Moscow view their profession: A pilot study. Public Relations Review, 36, 78-80.  Tsetsura, K. (2010). Performing thyself: Sparking imagination and exploring ethnic identity. The Journal for Learning through the Arts: A Research Journal on Arts Integration in Schools and Communities, 6(1). Retrieved from http://escholarship.org/uc/item/974542b5   Tsetsura, K., & Luoma-aho, V. (2010). Innovative thinking or distortion of journalistic values? How the lack of trust creates non-transparency in the Russian media. Ethical Space: The International Journal of Communication Ethics, 7(4), 30-38.  Klyueva, A., & Tsetsura, K. (2010). Media non-transparency research: A Case of Romania. Public Relations Journal, 4(4). Retrieved from http://www.prsa.org/Intelligence/PRJournal/Documents/2010FallKlyuevaTsetsura.pdf   Tsetsura, K., & Chernov, G. (2009). Constructing corporate reputation in the Russian media. Russian Journal of Communication, 2(1-2), 46-65.  Tsetsura, K., & Grynko, A. (2009). An exploratory study of the media transparency in Ukraine. Public Relations Journal, 3(2). Retrieved from http://www.prsa.org/SearchResults/download/6D-030205/0/An_Exploratory_Study_of_the_Media_Transparency_in  Tsetsura, K., & Kruckeberg, D. (2009). Corporate reputation: Beyond measurement. Public Relations Journal, 3(3). Retrieved from http://www.prsa.org/SearchResults/download/6D-030303/0/Corporate_Reputation_Beyond_Measuremen  [Named among the Top Five Papers Published in PR Journal in 2009]  Tsetsura, K. (2008). An exploratory study of global media relations practices. Institute for Public Relations Research Reports: International Research. Retrieved from http://www.instituteforpr.org/global-media-relations-practices-2008/  Kruckeberg, D., & Tsetsura, K. (2008). The Chicago school in global community: Concept explication for communication theories and practices. Asian Communication Research, 5, 9-30. [Lead article]  Tsetsura, K. (2005). Bribery for news coverage: Research in Poland. Institute for Public Relations Online: International Research. Retrieved from http://www.instituteforpr.org/bribery-poland-2005/   Kruckeberg, D., Tsetsura, K., & Ovaitt, F. (2005). International index of media bribery. In The Global Corruption Report 2005: Transparency International (pp. 258-261). London: Pluto Press.  Kruckeberg, D., & Tsetsura, K. (2003). International index of bribery for news coverage: A composite index by country of variables related to the likelihood of the existence of “cash for news coverage.” Institute for Public Relations Online: International Research. Retrieved from http://www.instituteforpr.org/bribery-news-coverage-2003/  

Marvin Lamb
Professor of Music
School of Music

Research
Croatia

International premiere of a new music composition in July 2018 for TENOR SAXOPHONE SOLOIST & 4 PRE RECORDED TENOR SAXOPHONES entitled WOODCUTS. Performance at the International Saxophone Congress in Croatia by faculty colleague, Dr Jonathan Nichol.  The 17 minute multi-movement work is based upon the jazz music compositions & arrangements of the  Woody Herman Band. 

Selected Publications
LAMENTATIONS for String Quartet (published by Carl Fischer,Inc) recorded & released by the Boston based PEDROIA QUARTET on their new CD/ QUADRANTS: VOLUME 2; Navona Records (Boston) nv 1684. Originally composed for the OU Crouse Quartet & premiered in France.

Tassie Hirschfield
Associate Professor
Department of Anthropology

Research
Cuba, Caucasus region, and other post-Soviet areas

My PhD research was done in Cuba, and I have continued to follow events on the Island since that time.  My most recent research project (together with Kirsten de Beurs in Geography) combines geospatial analysis, anthropology and history to explore changing patterns of infectious disease in the Caucasus region.  I am also interested in how political instability and corruption impact population health patterns in Latin America and elsewhere.

Selected Publications
Books:   Health, Politics and Revolution in Cuba since 1898 (Transaction Press 2007) Gangster-States:  Organized Crime, Kleptocracy and Political Collapse (Palgrave-Macmillan 2015)  Recent Articles:  Failing States as Epidemiological Risk Zones (Health Security, 2017) Rethinking Structural Violence (Society, 2017)

Michelle Morais de Sa e Silva
Assistant Professor of International and Area Studies
Department of International and Area Studies

Research
Brazil, Countries of the Geopolitical South

My research agenda has included studies on South-South cooperation, as well as on policy diffusion among developing countries. Among the policies of interest for these studies were education policies, poverty-reduction programs, and human rights programs. I am also starting a new research project on international organizations, currently looking at the case of Brazil and the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights.

Selected Publications

Morais de Sa e Silva, M. (forthcoming). The South as an arena of policy circulation: South-South cooperation on human rights policies. In Baker, T. and Walker, C. (Eds.) Public policy circulation: Arenas, agents, actions. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.  Morais de Sa e Silva, M. (2017). Poverty Reduction, Education, and the Global Diffusion of Conditional Cash Transfers. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.  Morais de Sa e Silva, M. (2016). Barriers and Enablers to the Sharing of Human Rights Policies through South-South Cooperation. Buenos Aires: Clacso.  Morais de Sa e Silva, M. (2015). Conditional cash transfers and improved education quality: A political search for the policy link. International Journal of Educational Development, 45 (2015) 169–181.  Morais Morais de Sa e Silva, M. (2014). Opportunity NYC Program, United States. In M. Poisson (ed.), Achieving transparency in pro-poor education incentives. Paris: International Institute for Educational Planning.  de Sa e Silva, M. (2012). Conditional cash transfers: paying to keep children in school and conquering the world. Three selected case studies. In G. Steiner-Khamsi and F. Waldow (eds.), World Yearbook of Education 2012. Policy Borrowing and Lending in Education. New York: Routledge.  Morais de Sa e Silva, M. (2009). South-South cooperation in times of global economic crisis. International Policy Center for Inclusive Growth, One Pager, n. 76.  Morais de Sa e Silva, M. (2008). South-South cooperation: Past and present conceptualization and practice. In G. Steiner-Khamsi and L. Chisholm (eds), South-South Cooperation in Education and Development. New York and London: Teachers College Press.  Morais de Sa e Silva, M. (2008). Opportunity NYC: a performance-based conditional cash transfer programme. A qualitative analysis. International Policy Center for Inclusive Growth, Working Paper, n. 49.  Jules, T. and Morais de Sa e Silva, M. (2008). How different disciplines have approached South-South cooperation and transfer. Journal of the Society for International Education, 6. Morais de Sa e Silva, M. (2008). Opportunity NYC: A controversial cash transfer in the North. In Poverty in Focus, vol. 15.  Morais de Sa e Silva, M. (2008). New York’s brand-new conditional cash transfer programme: What if it succeeds? International Policy Center for Inclusive Growth, One Pager, n. 60.  Mayer, P., Morais de Sa e Silva, M. (2008). Bogotá Equity in Education: Conditional subsidies for school attendance and postsecondary study. A qualitative evaluation. Inter-American Development Bank Evaluation paper.  Morais, M. (2005). Cooperação Sul-Sul em Alfabetização: rumo ao Desenvolvimento Humano. In Revista da Alfabetização Solidária, vol. 5 (5). Morais, M. (2005). South-South cooperation, policy transfer and best-practice reasoning: The transfer of the Solidarity in Literacy Program from Brazil to Mozambique. ISS Working Paper Series / General Series (Vol. 406, pp. 1–57). Erasmus University Rotterdam. Morais, M. (2002). De mãos dadas com a mulher : a Unesco como agente promotor da igualdade entre gêneros. Brasília: UNESCO.

William Shelton
Professor Emeritus
Department of Biology

Research
Israel, Egypt, Czech Republic

Management of fish reproduction for fish culture Multi-year collaboration in Israel (series of annual in-country research  collaborations - 2-8 months each); Egypt in- country research at Government Fish Research Station (2-3 months each for 3 years); multiple 2-3 week collaborative research at University of South Bohemia, Czech Republic, most recently including a one-year faculty appointment with the Laboratory of Fish Reproductive Physiology.  Continuation with 3 Czech researchers -- two 1-month collaborative research projects at the University of Oklahoma -- additional funding for continuation in review.

Director of Peace Corps Training Program Fish Culture volunteers-- Multi-year, trained 475 volunteers for 20 different countries.

Selected Publications

Multiple journal and book chapters on fish reproduction with several collaborators -- see bio-data here and professional synopsis here.

Alexander Jabbari
Farzaneh Family Assistant Professor of Persian Language and Literature
Department of International and Area Studies

Research
Iran and India

Persian was once the lingua franca of a broad region stretching from the Balkans in the west to China in the east, an area now referred to by scholars as the "Persianate world." My research is concerned with how intellectuals throughout the Persianate world sought to modernize their shared literary heritage. I work primarily on Persian and Urdu, but also draw from source material in Arabic and Turkish, as well as European languages. Methodologically, my work lies at the intersection of history, literary studies, and philology.

I am currently working on a monograph about how modernizers in Iran and India reworked Persianate materials to produce the genre of Persian literary history. I also have a number of articles in preparation dealing with various aspects of modernizing the Persianate world, including Urdu-Persian translation in Afghanistan and Iran, Persian literature in China, and Persian digital humanities.

Selected Publications
“The Making of Modernity in Persianate Literary History,” Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa, and the Middle East 36:3 (December 2016): 418-434

“Race, Modernity, and Temporality in Dear Uncle Napoleon.” In Persian Literature Unbound, ed. Nasrin Rahimieh. Irvine: Samuel Jordan Center for Persian Studies (forthcoming)

Manata Hashemi
Farzaneh Family Assistant Professor of Iranian Studies

Research
Iran and the Middle East.

My research examines how moral understandings interact with socioeconomic conditions to affect people’s behaviors and perceptions of the good life. I’m interested in how people find meaning and assert dignity and what role social norms, networks, and institutions play in that process, particularly among economically marginalized groups.  My current research answers these questions by drawing from extensive ethnographic fieldwork in the Middle East. 

My forthcoming (2020) book with New York University Press draws from participant observation and interviews in Iran to show how conformism to socially sanctioned norms enables some young men and women to gain social mobility within conditions of poverty. Illuminating how social practice is collectively judged, I reveal the embedded moral ideologies that both challenge and reproduce systems of inequality within communities. I'm currently working on a project examining how socially stigmatized labor in Iran contributes to the moral understandings that service workers hold of themselves and others. 

Selected Publications

Forthcoming 2020. The Face-Savers: Morality and Mobility in Contemporary Iran, New York: New York University Press.  

Forthcoming 2019. "Embedded Enclaves: Cultural Mimicry and Urban Social Exclusion in Iran," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research

2018. "Tarnished Work: Dignity and Labour in Iran," British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies. DOI: 10.1080/13530194.2018.1552116

2017. “Aspirations, Poverty and Behavior Among Youth in the Middle East – Some Theoretical Considerations,” The Muslim World 107: 83-99.  

2015. “Waithood and Face: Morality and Mobility Among Lower-Class Youth in Iran,” Qualitative Sociology 38: 261-283. 

2013.  Children in Crisis: Ethnographic Studies in International Contexts, with Martín Sánchez-Jankowski. New York: Routledge.

Peter Barker
Professor
Department of the History of Science

Research
Early Modern Europe, Safavid Persia and Mughal India

I am currently working on a book about celestial orbs (see the preliminary web site here), and doing research to undermine the thesis that science in the Islamic world declined after the thirteenth century.

Selected Publications
Barker, P. (2017) “The Social Structure of Islamicate Science” Journal of World Philosophies, 3, 37-47. Barker, P. and Heidarzadeh, T. (2016) “Copernicus, the Ṭūsī couple and East-West Exchange in the Fifteenth Century” in M. A. Grenada and P. Boner (eds.) Man and Cosmos (Barcelona: University of Barcelona Press), 19-57. Crowther, K. and Barker, P. (2013)  “Training the Intelligent Eye: Understanding Illustrations in Early Modern Astronomy Texts. “ Isis, 104, 429-70. Barker, P. (2013a) “Why was Copernicus a Copernican?” Metascience, 22, 1-6.  

Firat Demir
Professor
Department of Economics

Research
Development Economics, International Economics, Turkey, Middle East

Selected Publications
Books
1. “South-South Trade and Finance in the 21st Century: Rise of the South or a Second Great Divergence.” Anthem Press, 2016 (with O.S. Dahi). 

Publications in Refereed Journals
1. “Bilateral FDI Flows, Productivity Growth and Convergence: The North vs. the South.” World Development 101: 235 – 249, 2018 (with Y. Duan).
2. “South-South vs. South-North Economic Exchanges: Does it Matter Who is Exchanging What and with Whom?” Journal of Economic Surveys 31(5): 1449 – 1486, 2017 (with O.S. Dahi).
• Reprinted in R. Veneziani and L. Zamparelli (Eds.), Analytical Political Economy (p. 339 – 379). Wiley, 2018. 
3. “Exchange Rate Adjustments and US Trade with China: What does a State Level Analysis Tell Us?” Global Economy Journal 17(2): 1-14, 2017 (with C. Wu).
4. “Effects of FDI Flows on Institutional Development in the South: Does It Matter Where the Investors are from?” World Development 78: 341 – 359, 2016.
5. “Institutional Differences and Direction of Bilateral FDI Flows: Are South-South Flows any Different than the Rest?” The World Economy 39(12): 2000 – 2024, 2016 (with C. Hu).
6. “Total Factor Productivity, Foreign Direct Investment and Entry Barriers in Chinese Automobile Industry.” Emerging Markets Finance and Trade 52(2): 302 – 321, 2016 (with L. Su).
7. “Firm Productivity, Exchange Rate Movements, Sources of Finance and Export Orientation.” World Development 54: 204 – 219, 2014 (with M. Caglayan).
8. “Preferential Trade Agreements and Manufactured Goods Trade: Does It Matter Whom You PTA With?” Applied Economics 45(34): 4754 – 4772, 2013 (with O.S. Dahi).
9. “Growth under Exchange Rate Volatility: Does Access to Foreign or Domestic Equity Markets Matter.” Journal of Development Economics 100(1): 74 – 88, 2013.
• Winner of the 2013 Best Academic Paper Award by the Central Bank of Turkey.
10. “Trade Flows, Exchange Rate Uncertainty and Financial Depth: Evidence from 28 Emerging Countries.” Southern Economic Journal 79(4): 905 – 927, 2013 (with M. Caglayan and O.S. Dahi).
11. “Income Inequality and Structures of International Trade.” Asia Pacific Journal of Accounting and Economics 19(2): 167 – 180, 2012 (with J. Ju and Y. Zhou).
12. “Asymmetric Effects of Financial Development on South-South and South-North Trade: Panel Data Evidence from Emerging Markets.” Journal of Development Economics 94(1): 139 – 149, 2011 (with O.S. Dahi).
13. “Exchange Rate Volatility and Employment Growth in Developing Countries: Evidence from Turkey.” World Development 38(8): 1127 – 1140, 2010.
• Winner of the 2008 Ibn Khaldun Prize in Economics awarded by the Middle East Economics Association.
14. “Financial Liberalization, Private Investment and Portfolio Choice: Financialization of Real Sectors in Emerging Markets.” Journal of Development Economics 88(2): 314 – 324, 2009. 
15. “Capital Market Imperfections and Financialization of Real Sectors in Emerging Markets: Private Investment and Cash Flow Relationship Revisited.” World Development 37(5): 953 – 964, 2009. 
16. “Volatility of Short Term Capital Flows and Private Investment in Emerging Markets.” Journal of Development Studies 45(5): 672 – 692, 2009. 
17. “Financialization and Manufacturing Firm Profitability under Uncertainty and Macroeconomic Volatility: Evidence from an Emerging Market.” Review of Development Economics 13(4): 592 – 609, 2009. 
18. “Macroeconomic Uncertainty and Private Investment in Argentina, Mexico and Turkey.” Applied Economics Letters 16(6): 567 – 571, 2009. 
19. “South-South Trade in Manufactures: Current Performance and Obstacles for Growth.” Review of Radical Political Economics 40(3): 266 – 275, 2008 (with O.S. Dahi). 
20. “The Rise of Rentier Capitalism and the Financialization of Real Sectors in Developing Countries.” Review of Radical Political Economics 39(3): 351 – 359, 2007. 
• Translated (in Turkish) and reprinted in Mulkiye Dergisi 257: 25 – 35, 2007.
21. “Militarization of the Market and Rent Seeking Coalitions in Turkey.” Development and Change 36(4): 667 – 690, 2005.
22. “A Failure Story: Politics and Financial Liberalization in Turkey, Revisiting the Revolving Door Hypothesis.” World Development 32(5): 851 – 869, 2004.

Publications in Edited Books
23. “Büyük İstikrar Döneminden Büyük Durgunluk Dönemine: Krizdeki Kapitalizm veya Kriz Kapitalizmi (From the Great Moderation to the Great Recession: Capitalism in Crisis or Crisis Capitalism).” In C. Bakir, Z. Onis, and F. Senses (Eds.), Küresel Ekonomik Kriz Sonrasında Yeni Dünya Düzeni (The New World Order after the Global Economic Crisis) (pp. 119-142). Iletisim, 2013.
24. “Labor Market Performance after Structural Adjustment in Developing Countries: The Interesting but not so Unique Case of Turkey.” In L.K. Valencia and B.J. Hahn (Eds.), Employment and Labor Issues: Unemployment, Youth Employment and Child Labor (pp.1 – 37). Nova Science Publishers, 2010 (with N. Erdem).
25. “A Political Economy Analysis of the Turkish Military’s Split Personality: The Patriarchal Master or Crony Capitalist?” In T. Cetin and F. Yilmaz (Eds.), Understanding the Process of Economic Change in Turkey: An Institutional Approach (pp.159 – 181). Nova Science Publishers, 2010. 
26. “Turkish Post-Crisis Development Experience from a Comparative Perspective: Structural Break of Business as Usual?” In Z. Önis and F. Senses (Eds.), Turkish Economy in the Post-Crisis Era: The New Phase of Neo-Liberal Restructuring and Integration to the Global Economy (pp.11 – 33). Routledge, 2009. 
27. “Volatility of Short Term Capital Flows and Socio-Political Instability in Developing Countries: A Review.” In T.N. Caldeira (Ed.), Economics of Developing Countries (pp.53 – 77). Nova Science Publishers, 2009.
28. “Economic Development and the Fabrication of the Middle East as a Eurocentric Project.” In R.K. Kanth (Ed.) The Challenge of Eurocentrism (pp.63 – 82). MacMillan, 2009 (with F. Kaboub).
29. “The Middle East and North Africa.” In A.K. Dutt and J. Ros (Eds.), International Handbook of Development Economics (pp.522 – 535). Edward Elgar, 2008 (with O.S. Dahi). 
30. “Value Creation in Acquisitions: Privatization of Turk Telekom.” In H.F. Ulrich and E.P. Lehrmann (Eds.), Telecommunications Research Trends (pp.107 – 126). Nova Science Publishers, 2008 (with V.B. Uysal).
Publications in Policy Journals
31. “Erdogan’s War.” Foreign Policy, March 18, 2016. 
32. “Ankara Blues: Yet More Bombings, Reflections on the Cheapness of life in Turkey.” The Globalist, October 13, 2015. 
33. “Turkey’s Enemy Within.” Foreign Policy, January 23, 2014.
34. “Why the Protests in Turkey make me Optimistic about the Future of Democracy.” Foreign Policy, June 6, 2013. 
35. “Here is What You Need to Know about the Clashes in Turkey.” Foreign Policy, June 1, 2013. 

Other Publications
36. “From Islamic Renaissance to Neo-Fascism in Turkey.” Review of Middle East Studies 50(2): 1-9, 2017. 
37. “The Rise of the South: Essays in South-South Trade and Finance.” Latin American Council of Social Sciences, Buenos Aires: CLASCO, 2015 (with O.S. Dahi).

Afshin Marashi
Farzaneh Family Chair of Modern Iranian History
Department of International and Area Studies

Research
Iran

My main area of research is the cultural and intellectual history of modern Iranian nationalism. I specifically focus on the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, roughly between 1870-1940. Most of my research has focused on the question of how Iran’s ancient, classical, and pre-Islamic heritage has been reshaped and reinvented to serve the demands of the nation-building project of the modern period. How have Iranians chosen to remember their cultural past? What political interests have shaped this process of cultural selection? What has been omitted or erased in this process, and what has been emphasized or exaggerated? Finally, how has this history of cultural contestation shaped the political outcomes of Iran’s modern and contemporary history?

I also served a three-year term as a member of the editorial board of the International Journal of Middle East Studies.   I was also elected to the council of the Association of Iranian Studies.   In 2017 I was invited to the give the "Afrassiabi Distinguished Lecture in Persian and Iranian Studies" at the University of Washington. 

Selected Publications
I’ve published one single-authored book, and co-edited two collections of essays that relate to these research questions. I have also published approximately a dozen peer-reviewed articles and book chapters.   My first book, Nationalizing Iran: Culture, Power, and the State, 1870-1940, was published by the University of Washington Press in 2008. I subsequently co-edited (with Kamran Aghaie) an edited volume titled Rethinking Iranian Nationalism and Modernity, which was published in 2014. I have also co-edited (with Mana Kia) a collection of essays titled "After the Persianate" for a special issue of the journal Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa, and the Middle East, published in 2016. This collection of essays was based on a conference that I organized at OU's Farzaneh Center for Iranian Studies in 2014.  I am currently completing my second single-authored monograph, titled Exile and Kingdom: The Parsi Community of India and the Making of Modern Iranian Nationalism. The manuscript is under contract with the University of Texas Press. 

Joshua Landis
Prof and Director, Center for Middle East Studies
Department of International and Area Studies  

I continue to research the civil war in Syria and write about it for “Syria Comment,” my online newsletter about Syrian politics that is visited by readers over two hundred times a year.   I have appeared in print, on radio or TV over 100 times this year, including in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal and Washington Post.  I have been interviewd on the BBC and NPR Newshour and 

Katerina Tsetsura
Associate Professor
Gaylord College of Journalism and Mass Communications

Research
Europe (Finland, Spain, Ukraine, Russia, etc.); South Pacific Asia; exploring connections with S. America

My research interests are closely aligned with global strategic communication. In short, I study how strategic communication helps to shape knowledge societies in transition. My research crosses boundaries and addresses issues in global and intercultural advertising, public relations, and strategic communication, mass media ethics, and business and strategic management. My scholarship examines cultural, political, economic, and societal influences on strategic communication practice and the ethical dimensions of this professionalized occupation in different nations and global regions. As part of my decade-long media transparency research project, I examine, from multiple perspectives, global advertising, public relations, and journalism practices throughout the world.   My primary research area that investigates how global media transparency defines public relations-media interactions assumes the disclosure of all sources and possible influences on the news in the media. Thus, media non-transparency, or media opacity, is defined as any form of payment for news coverage or any influence on editorial decisions that is not explicitly indicated in the finished product of the media, such as a journalistic report, an article, or a program. I explore media transparency from the perspectives of global and international journalism and public relations ethics and from socially constructed media relations practices worldwide.   My other recent research project focused on the role and functions of media-related NGOs and independent media development in countries having transitional regimes. In 2011-2012, I conducted an extensive research in Ukraine to study independent media development as part of the global Media Map Project, which was sponsored by the Melinda and Bill Gates Foundation and was supported by the World Bank Foundation. I conducted additional research on the subject in 2015 as part of the USAID evaluation of the Ukraine Media project. In 2017, I worked on the evaluation and measurement research team to evaluate the continuing development of civil society in Ukraine.   Recently, I completed the research project on identifying global capabilities for public relations. I led the U.S. research team in this global project that spanned nine countries to develop the global capability framework for public relations and communications management. This two-year research project (2016-2018), supported by the Global Alliance for Public Relations and Communication Management (GA), designed the framework for professional bodies and practitioners around the world and serves as a research to influence 21st Century curricula.  

See my curriculum vitae here.

Selected Publications

Tsetsura, K., & Aziz, K. (2018). Toward professional standards for media transparency in the United States: Comparison of perceptions of non-transparency in national vs. regional media. Public Relations Review, 44(1), 180-190.  Online first: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0363811117301030   Nguyen, T., &Tsetsura, K. (2017). Gift-giving and media transparency in Vietnam.  PR Journal, 1. (A special issue: Public Relations Practices in Asia). Retrieved from http://prjournal.instituteforpr.org/wp-content/uploads/04GiftGivingCultureinVietnam.pdf  Tsetsura, K., & Valentini, C. (2016). The “holy” triad in media ethics:  A conceptual model for understanding global media ethics.  Public Relations Review, 42(4), 573-581.   Tsetsura, K. (2015). Ukrainian NGOs as opinion makers: How media organizations communicate about progress in new democracy with western donors. Tripodos, 37, 91-110.  Boldonova, I., & Tsetsura, K. (2015). Volunteering movement in Russia: Regional presence and future perspectives. Styles of Communication, 7(1), 7-22. [Lead article]  Tsetsura, K. (2015). Guanxi, gift-giving, or bribery? Ethical considerations of paid news in China. Public Relations Journal, 9(2). Retrieved from  https://www.prsa.org/Intelligence/PRJournal/Documents/2015v09n02Tsetsura.pdf   Klyueva, A., & Tsetsura, K. (2015).  Economic foundations of morality:  Questions of transparency and ethics in Russian journalism. Central European Journal of Communication, 8(1). Retrieved from http://ptks.pl/cejc/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/03-kluyeva.pdf    Uysal, N., & Tsetsura, K. (2015). Corporate governance on stakeholder issues: Shareholder activism as a guiding force. Journal of Public Affairs, 15(2), 210-219.  DOI: 10.1002/pa.1529. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/pa.1529/abstract   Tsetsura, K., Bentley, J., & Newcomb, T. (2015). Idealistic and conflicted: New portrayals of public relations practitioners in film. Public Relations Review, 41(5), 652-661.   Tsetsura, K. (2014). Constructing public relations as a women’s profession. Revista Internacional de Relaciones Públicas: International Journal of Public Relations, 4(8), 85-110. [Special Issue on European Public Relations]. Retrieved from http://revistarelacionespublicas.uma.es/index.php/revrrpp/article/view/293/178     Tsetsura, K. (2013). Challenges in framing women’s rights as human rights at the domestic level: A case study of NGOs in the post-Soviet countries. Public Relations Review, 39, 406-416.   Tsetsura, K. (2012). A struggle for legitimacy: Russian women secure their professional identities in public relations in a hyper-sexualized patriarchal workplace. Public Relations Journal, 6(1). Retrieved from http://www.prsa.org/Intelligence/PRJournal/Documents/2012Tsetsura.pdf    Chernov, G., & Tsetsura, K. (2012). Building a bridge between corporate reputation and corporate social responsibility in the Ukrainian print media. International Journal of Emerging Markets, 7(2), 132-145. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?articleid=17026341&ini=aob   Klyueva, A., & Tsetsura, K. (2011). News from the Urals with love and payment: The first look at non-transparent media practices in the Urals Federal District of Russia. Russian Journal of Communication, 4(1/2), 72-93.  Tsetsura, K. (2011). How understanding multidimensional diversity can benefit global public relations education. Public Relations Review, 37(5), 530-535. [Special issue on public relations pedagogy; winner of the 2012 NCA PRIDE Award]   Tsetsura, K. (2011). Is public relations a real job? How female practitioners construct the profession. Journal of Public Relations Research, 23(1), 1-23. [Lead article]  Tsetsura, K.  (2010). How female practitioners in Moscow view their profession: A pilot study. Public Relations Review, 36, 78-80.  Tsetsura, K. (2010). Performing thyself: Sparking imagination and exploring ethnic identity. The Journal for Learning through the Arts: A Research Journal on Arts Integration in Schools and Communities, 6(1). Retrieved from http://escholarship.org/uc/item/974542b5   Tsetsura, K., & Luoma-aho, V. (2010). Innovative thinking or distortion of journalistic values? How the lack of trust creates non-transparency in the Russian media. Ethical Space: The International Journal of Communication Ethics, 7(4), 30-38.  Klyueva, A., & Tsetsura, K. (2010). Media non-transparency research: A Case of Romania. Public Relations Journal, 4(4). Retrieved from http://www.prsa.org/Intelligence/PRJournal/Documents/2010FallKlyuevaTsetsura.pdf   Tsetsura, K., & Chernov, G. (2009). Constructing corporate reputation in the Russian media. Russian Journal of Communication, 2(1-2), 46-65.  Tsetsura, K., & Grynko, A. (2009). An exploratory study of the media transparency in Ukraine. Public Relations Journal, 3(2). Retrieved from http://www.prsa.org/SearchResults/download/6D-030205/0/An_Exploratory_Study_of_the_Media_Transparency_in  Tsetsura, K., & Kruckeberg, D. (2009). Corporate reputation: Beyond measurement. Public Relations Journal, 3(3). Retrieved from http://www.prsa.org/SearchResults/download/6D-030303/0/Corporate_Reputation_Beyond_Measuremen  [Named among the Top Five Papers Published in PR Journal in 2009]  Tsetsura, K. (2008). An exploratory study of global media relations practices. Institute for Public Relations Research Reports: International Research. Retrieved from http://www.instituteforpr.org/global-media-relations-practices-2008/  Kruckeberg, D., & Tsetsura, K. (2008). The Chicago school in global community: Concept explication for communication theories and practices. Asian Communication Research, 5, 9-30. [Lead article]  Tsetsura, K. (2005). Bribery for news coverage: Research in Poland. Institute for Public Relations Online: International Research. Retrieved from http://www.instituteforpr.org/bribery-poland-2005/   Kruckeberg, D., Tsetsura, K., & Ovaitt, F. (2005). International index of media bribery. In The Global Corruption Report 2005: Transparency International (pp. 258-261). London: Pluto Press.  Kruckeberg, D., & Tsetsura, K. (2003). International index of bribery for news coverage: A composite index by country of variables related to the likelihood of the existence of “cash for news coverage.” Institute for Public Relations Online: International Research. Retrieved from http://www.instituteforpr.org/bribery-news-coverage-2003/  

Tassie Hirschfield
Associate Professor
Department of Anthropology

Research
Cuba, Caucasus region, and other post-Soviet areas

My PhD research was done in Cuba, and I have continued to follow events on the Island since that time.  My most recent research project (together with Kirsten de Beurs in Geography) combines geospatial analysis, anthropology and history to explore changing patterns of infectious disease in the Caucasus region.  I am also interested in how political instability and corruption impact population health patterns in Latin America and elsewhere.

Selected Publications
Books:   Health, Politics and Revolution in Cuba since 1898 (Transaction Press 2007) Gangster-States:  Organized Crime, Kleptocracy and Political Collapse (Palgrave-Macmillan 2015)  Recent Articles:  Failing States as Epidemiological Risk Zones (Health Security, 2017) Rethinking Structural Violence (Society, 2017)

William Shelton
Professor Emeritus
Department of Biology

Research
Israel, Egypt, Czech Republic

Management of fish reproduction for fish culture Multi-year collaboration in Israel (series of annual in-country research  collaborations - 2-8 months each); Egypt in- country research at Government Fish Research Station (2-3 months each for 3 years); multiple 2-3 week collaborative research at University of South Bohemia, Czech Republic, most recently including a one-year faculty appointment with the Laboratory of Fish Reproductive Physiology.  Continuation with 3 Czech researchers -- two 1-month collaborative research projects at the University of Oklahoma -- additional funding for continuation in review.

Director of Peace Corps Training Program Fish Culture volunteers-- Multi-year, trained 475 volunteers for 20 different countries.

Selected Publications

Multiple journal and book chapters on fish reproduction with several collaborators -- see bio-data here and professional synopsis here.