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About AME

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About AME

The School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering at the University of Oklahoma is one of seven schools within the Gallogly College of Engineering. This school has a rich history at the university and has produced many outstanding alumni. Additionally, we are very proud to say that both Aerospace Engineering and Mechanical Engineering undergraduate programs are accredited by Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET.

The School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering (AME) prepares students at all levels to solve engineering problems that are seen on a daily basis. Additionally, the school grooms students to solve the problems that the future holds. Through project-based education, working in teams of fellow students, and the 26 full-time faculty of the school, students gain an unique educational experience in AME.


Welcome to the School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering where you will have the opportunity to be a part of a diverse community engaged in experiential learning and cutting-edge research on your way to a successful career in industry, government, and academia.

Our undergraduate students enjoy an exceptional educational experience through innovative teaching from our faculty and participation in hands-on projects and laboratories. Being a part of our student competition teams helps develop not only engineering and inter-personal skills but also bonds that last a lifetime. Working on capstone projects sponsored by industry and internships in companies creates professional relationships leading to success after graduation. 

Our faculty members are engaged in high-impact research in a variety of areas, including advanced materials, sustainable energy, combustion and heat transfer, design and manufacturing, robotics and unmanned vehicles, and bioengineering.  The research work is sponsored by a variety of sources, including the National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, National Institute of Health, Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology, Schlumberger, and Honeywell Corporation.

Our graduate students thrive in the research environment as they pursue their MS and PhD degrees in aerospace and mechanical engineering; they partner with faculty members in research publications and patents. Our alumni can be found in companies such as Baker Hughes, Boeing, Caterpillar, Chesapeake Energy, Devon Energy, Exxon Mobil, Deere, Intel, John Zink, Lockheed Martin, Raytheon, Schlumberger, and Space X, as well as agencies such as NASA, Tinker Air Force Base, FAA, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Follow us on social media and enjoy our success stories; you can be a part of them. We provide an inclusive and dynamic experience through excellence in teaching, research, and service. Please do not hesitate to contact me at rparthasarathy@ou.edu with comments, questions or suggestions. 

Welcome, I look forward to working with you.

Kumar Parthasarathy

Professor and Interim Director

The history of the School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering began in 1905 when the University of Oklahoma established the School of Applied Science consisting of Mechanical Engineering, Civil Engineering and Electrical Engineering. In 1908, James Houston Felgar became the Director of the Department of Mechanical Engineering, a position which he filled until 1925. In 1909, the College of Engineering was established and James Felgar served as the Dean of the College of Engineering from 1909 to 1937. In 2015, the College of Engineering was renamed the Gallogly College of Engineering (GCoE).

An Aeronautical Engineering option was added to the Mechanical Engineering program in 1929, which spurred the construction of the Wind Tunnel in 1936. During this timeframe, the Mechanical Engineering program was first accredited on October 1, 1936. These important milestones in the development of the program took place under the tenure of William Henry Carson. He served as Director of the Department of Mechanical Engineering from 1927 to 1942. Like Dean Felgar, he also served as Dean of the College of Engineering during this time.

In 1947, the Department of Aeronautical Engineering was established within the School of Mechanical Engineering. The School of Aeronautical Engineering was established as separate from the School of Mechanical Engineering in 1954. However, this name did not last long; the school was named the School of Aeronautical and Space Engineering in 1959 in order to keep up with the national trends. In 1963, the School of Aeronautical and Space Engineering and the School of Mechanical Engineering merged to become the School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering (AME).

Today, AME is one of seven schools within GCoE at the University of Oklahoma. Located in historic Felgar Hall, AME's vision is to be recognized as the premier learning community of faculty, staff and students that upholds collegiality and synergistic collaboration in the pursuit of academic excellence. We strive to be a community that values both individual and collective achievements. In keeping with this vision, AME offers students a diverse engineering education that emphasizes rigorous engineering curricula coupled with learning through doing. Students at all levels - undergraduate and graduate - have opportunities to participate in a number of learning experiences.

The mission of the School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering (AME) is to provide the best possible educational experience for our students through excellence in teaching, research and creative activity, and service to society, nationally and internationally. 

Program Educational Objectives are broad statements that describe what graduates are expected to attain within a few years of graduation.

a. Our graduates will have successful professional careers in industry, government, academia or non-profit organizations. 

b. Our graduates will be successful in solving the engineering problems associated with the lifecycle of complex systems.

c. Our graduates will continue to learn and advance their careers through activities such as participation in professional organizations, attainment of professional certification and post-graduate study. 

Student Outcomes are statements that describe what students are expected to know and be able to do by the time of graduation.  These relate to the skills, knowledge and behaviors that students acquire as they progress through the program.

1. An ability to identify, formulate, and solve complex engineering problems by applying principles of engineering, science, and mathematics

2. An ability to apply engineering design to produce solutions that meet specified needs with consideration of public health, safety, and welfare, as well as global, cultural, social, environmental, and economic factors

3. An ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences

4. An ability to recognize ethical and professional responsibilities in engineering situations and make informed judgments, which must consider the impact of engineering solutions in global, economic, environmental, and societal contexts

5. An ability to function effectively on a team whose members together provide leadership, create a collaborative and inclusive environment, establish goals, plan tasks, and meet objectives

6. An ability to develop and conduct appropriate experimentation, analyze and interpret data, and use engineering judgment to draw conclusions

7. An ability to acquire and apply new knowledge as needed, using appropriate learning strategies

8. Knowledge of the major aeronautical topics and some astronautical topics (aerospace engineering only)

The mission of the School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering (AME) is to provide the best possible educational experience for our students through excellence in teaching, research and creative activity, and service to the state and society, nationally and internationally.

Program Educational Objectives are broad statements that describe what graduates are expected to attain within a few years of graduation.

a. Our graduates will have successful professional careers in industry, government, academia or non-profit organizations.

b. Our graduates will be successful in solving the engineering problems associated with the lifecycle of complex systems.

c. Our graduates will continue to learn and advance their careers through activities such as participation in professional organizations, attainment of professional certification and post-graduate study.

Student Outcomes are statements that describe what students are expected to know and be able to do by the time of graduation. These relate to the skills, knowledge and behaviors that students acquire as they progress through the program.

1. An ability to identify, formulate, and solve complex engineering problems by applying principles of engineering, science, and mathematics

2. An ability to apply engineering design to produce solutions that meet specified needs with consideration of public health, safety, and welfare, as well as global, cultural, social, environmental, and economic factors

3. An ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences

4. An ability to recognize ethical and professional responsibilities in engineering situations and make informed judgments, which must consider the impact of engineering solutions in global, economic, environmental, and societal contexts

5. An ability to function effectively on a team whose members together provide leadership, create a collaborative and inclusive environment, establish goals, plan tasks, and meet objectives

6. An ability to develop and conduct appropriate experimentation, analyze and interpret data, and use engineering judgment to draw conclusions

7. An ability to acquire and apply new knowledge as needed, using appropriate learning strategies

8. Knowledge of thermal or mechanical systems (mechanical engineering only)