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TU, OU Move Forward to Expand the Community Medical School in Tulsa to a Four-Year Program

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

12-18-13

CONTACT: OU Public Affairs, (405) 325-1701

TULSA – The University of Tulsa and the University of Oklahoma recently signed a memorandum of understanding further advancing the partnership that has formed the Tulsa School of Community Medicine.

This document begins the process of seeking approval from the Liaison Committee on Medical Education to expand the Tulsa School of Community Medicine’s four-year educational track.

The first-year class will enter the school in 2015 and will consist of 25 students, with enrollment expected to grow over time.

The Tulsa School of Community Medicine does not require any new state dollars to expand from a two-year to a four-year program. The new school is funded entirely by private donors, including major gifts from the George Kaiser Family Foundation, the William K. Warren Foundation, Oxley Foundation, Mervin Bovaird Foundation, Charles and Lynn Schusterman Family Foundation, A.R. and Marylouise Tandy Foundation, Leta McFarlin Chapman Memorial Trust and Saint Francis Health System.

“We are proud to partner with TU, one of the nation’s leading private universities,” said OU President David L. Boren. “By working together, we will be able to train more M.D.s for underserved areas in Tulsa and northeastern Oklahoma. We are excited that we will be able to expand our current program with TU.”

“We are honored to participate in the expansion of medical education in Tulsa with the University of Oklahoma,” said TU President Steadman Upham. “The University of Tulsa’s mission includes serving our community, and the Tulsa School of Community Medicine will play a significant role in improving the lives of those who have had difficulty accessing health care in the past.”

The governing boards of both universities recently approved moving forward to create the Tulsa School of Community Medicine.