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The University of Oklahoma and Mewbourne College are continually monitoring COVID-19. Click below to find the latest information on OU's response to the pandemic. OU Together is a resource dedicated to up-to-date information.

COVID-19 RESPONSE OU TOGETHER

Assistant Professor Structural Geology/Tectonics

The School of Geosciences at the University of Oklahoma (OU) invites applications for a tenure-­track position in Structural Geology / Tectonics at the rank of Assistant Professor. The position will contribute to and expand upon existing interdisciplinary strengths in the department via the study of the 3D architecture and evolution of Earth's surface/crust, associated deformation and deformation processes, and potential use-­inspired research. The candidate must hold a Ph.D. in a related field at the time of appointment and exhibit strong research potential. The candidate is expected to establish an innovative, independent, and externally funded research program, build collaborations within and outside the School, and work with colleagues and students toward OU’s Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion goals. The candidate must have a demonstrated interest in teaching both undergraduate and graduate courses and mentoring graduate students. Example courses include, but are not limited to, Tectonic Geomorphology, Faulted & Fractured Reservoirs and Subsurface Fluid Storage, Advanced Structural Geology, Geodynamics, and Tectonics & Climate. Salary and start-­up funds will be commensurate with experience.

We are looking for a broad-­minded colleague whose skills and interests will complement and build upon existing areas of research within the department. The research area is open but can include topics such as field-­based studies, landscape evolution and tectonic geomorphology, geologic hazards, the structure and long-­term stability of subsurface reservoirs, and tectonics and the carbon cycle. The School of Geosciences, part of the Mewbourne College of Earth and Energy, has a large, vibrant faculty with a broad range of research activities in energy geosciences, paleoclimate and environmental geology, geochemistry, seismicity and earth structure, among others. Current departmental emphases include induced seismicity, fluid-­mineral-­organic matter interactions, and subsurface reservoir characterization and monitoring. The position supports college initiatives and research priorities in energy geosciences, seismicity, and water. The position also integrates into university-wide major research initiatives in energy, environmental sustainability, and computer/data science.

Apply here: https://apply.interfolio.com/92921

Assistant Curator of Vertebrate Paleontology, Sam Noble Museum & Assistant Professor, School of Geosciences

The Sam Noble Museum (https://samnoblemuseum.ou.edu/) and the School of Geosciences (https://www.ou.edu/mcee/geosciences) at the University of Oklahoma seek two innovative and enthusiastic colleagues to fill tenure-track split positions as Assistant Curators at the Sam Noble Museum and Assistant Professors in the School of Geosciences to begin in July 2022.

We seek colleagues who will establish discipline-leading, student-involved, and externally funded research programs; build collaborations within and outside the University; and work with colleagues and students toward OU’s Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion goals. The ideal candidates for these Assistant Curator/Assistant Professor positions will perform specimen-based research in any related subfield of vertebrate or invertebrate paleontology, including but not limited to biodiversity, paleoecology, phylogeny reconstruction, evolutionary or conservation paleobiology, isotope or trace element geochemistry, and/or paleoclimatology, and would have experience working with museum collections.

Apply here: http://apply.interfolio.com/93461

Assistant Curator of Invertebrate Paleontology, Sam Noble Museum & Assistant Professor, School of Geosciences

The Sam Noble Museum (https://samnoblemuseum.ou.edu/) and the School of Geosciences (https://www.ou.edu/mcee/geosciences) at the University of Oklahoma seek two innovative and enthusiastic colleagues to fill tenure-track split positions as Assistant Curators at the Sam Noble Museum and Assistant Professors in the School of Geosciences to begin in July 2022.

We seek colleagues who will establish discipline-leading, student-involved, and externally funded research programs; build collaborations within and outside the University; and work with colleagues and students toward OU’s Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion goals. The ideal candidates for these Assistant Curator/Assistant Professor positions will perform specimen-based research in any related subfield of vertebrate or invertebrate paleontology, including but not limited to biodiversity, paleoecology, phylogeny reconstruction, evolutionary or conservation paleobiology, isotope or trace element geochemistry, and/or paleoclimatology, and would have experience working with museum collections.

Apply here: http://apply.interfolio.com/93465

The School of Geosciences welcomes Dr. Caitlin Hodges and Dr. Sina Saneiyan


Caitlin Hodges is a critical zone geoscientist working at the interface of soil science and biogeochemistry, pursuing fundamental research in soil C cycle-weathering feedbacks and redox cycling in upland soils. She uses the understandings gained from this fundamental work to address the challenges we face in a world of rapid environmental change. Specifically, Caitlin’s research addresses two of the grand challenges in the environmental sciences: the global C cycle and water quality. She asks questions that span from mineral interactions at the micron scale to broad gradients that cross ecosystems. Caitlin’s analytical toolbox consists of both laboratory and field techniques, including traditional soil mineral extractions, field monitoring of elemental and nutrient fluxes, geophysical proximal sensing, and novel in situ sensor arrays. Her interdisciplinary approaches and interests lend themselves to diverse research questions, both applied and fundamental, poised to address soil’s role in modulating element and nutrient fluxes across scales.

Caitlin received her Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science and Master’s in Ecology at the University of Georgia. She obtained her Doctorate in Soil Science and Biogeochemistry at Pennsylvania State University.

During her PhD, Caitlin led fieldtrips and field-based classes for graduate and undergraduate students and is passionate about providing students at the University of Oklahoma with similar field-based learning experiences in soil and critical zone science. She is excited to explore the diverse soils and landscapes of Oklahoma with her students through her teaching and research programs.


Sina Saneiyan is a geophysicist whose research mainly focuses on near-surface environmental and engineering problems. Sina began his professional geophysical work as an ore exploration engineer right after finishing his B.Sc. but soon after, he realized there is much more to learn and study in his field. He started his Ph.D. in 2015, working on the novel and interesting idea of bridging geophysics and engineering. Sina chose the environmentally friendly microbial-induced carbonate precipitation (MICP) soil stabilization (a process to reinforce the soil for building purposes) method as his primary research focus and aimed to study this relatively new engineering ground improvement approach with geophysics. By the end of his Ph.D., he successfully showed geophysical methods (particularly induced polarization) are excellent in monitoring MICP in a non-invasive manner and can provide much more details compared to the old-fashioned direct monitoring techniques (such as soil sampling).

Sina’s current research builds upon his initial goal of bridging geophysics and engineering. He is now trying to find the geophysical signatures of soils under dynamic forces (heavy rain, landslides, earthquakes, etc.). We, humans, depend on the stability of the soil that we live upon and understanding the mechanical properties of soils play a crucial role in site assessment for construction and infrastructure. Soils with low shear strength can become unstable as a result of natural and/or anthropogenic induced forces, therefore knowing their state under such forces is vital. Geophysical methods have proven to be sensitive to changes in the soils caused by dynamic forces. In his future research, Sina is aiming to show that geophysical methods (particularly electrical methods, such as spectral induced polarization and electrical resistivity) can be used as reliable and permanent site characterization tools for monitoring areas prone to soil failure, such as active landslide zones. Although this would require developing new tools and software capable of conducting large-scale surveys and analyzing data fast and intelligently, ultimately such monitoring methods can be used as effective geo-hazard mitigation tools in the future.

Sina holds a B.Sc. in Mining Engineering from the University of Tehran, an M.Sc. in Petroleum Engineering from Shahrood University of Technology, and a Ph.D. in Environmental Sciences from Rutgers University. His postdoctoral research is on the assessment of soil deformation and failure with complex electrical methods. Sina is an experienced geophysicist and knows a wide range of geophysical techniques. He has research experience from his small laboratory to surveying Lake Michigan. He also is a skilled programmer. Sina is a core developer of ResIPy (2D/3D modeling and inversion of geoelectrical data), SIPy Studio (1D spectral induced polarization data analysis), and has contributed to developing EMagPy (modeling and inversion of electromagnetic data). Sina has an extensive teaching portfolio and believes that a diverse and inclusive environment is vital for preparing students for a successful future, therefore he is committed to promoting diversity and inclusion at the University of Oklahoma. Aside from work, Sina is an avid cyclist with thousands of miles ridden on his bike, Red! He also loves photography and backpacking, because there is nothing more fascinating than nature.

OU Field Camp Video