OMS Logo Oklahoma Microscopy Society (OMS) OMS Logo

The Oklahoma Microscopy Society is a local affiliate society of the Microscopy Society of America (MSA), the Microbeam Analysis Society (MAS) and the Oklahoma Academy of Science (OAS). The Society was founded as the Oklahoma Society for Electron Microscopy (Ok-SEM) in September 1977, becoming the 18th local affiliated society of MSA (then EMSA) and the 11th section of OAS. There are two scheduled meetings each year: (1) a technical meeting is held every fall in conjunction with the OAS and (2) a one- or two-day workshop is held every spring. Information about these meetings is located below.

An OMS membership form is available online in PDF format. A free reader for PDF files is at the Adobe web site. Membership in the Oklahoma Microscopy Society is available to anyone with an interest in microscopy. Corporate membership is $50, regular professional membership is $15 and student membership is $5 per academic year (July 1, 2016-June 30, 2017). Membership privileges include participation in society events, two newsletters/year and access to mailing lists. For Paypal payments go to http://www.ou.edu/research/electron/oms/paypaldues.html. Advertisements are accepted from Corporate Members through the Secretary-Treasurer and Newsletter Editor (see Officers) and a free link to their WWW Corporate Home Page is provided.

The latest OMS newsletter (Fall, 2016) is available online at this link (in PDF format). An archive of OMS newsletters is available at http://www.microscopy.ou.edu/oms-newsletters/.

Spring Meeting 2017:

The Oklahoma Microscopy Society (OMS) will be holding its Spring meeting at the http://samnoblemuseum.ou.edu/ Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History (Norman, OK) during the evening of Thursday, May 18 from 5 pm-9 pm. The evening will be a dinner tribute to the 40th anniversary of the OMS and also the 20th anniversary of the Ugly Bug Contest (http://www.uglybug.org/). The museum is currently hosting an exhibit for the Ugly Bug Contest "UGLY BUGS: Celebrating 20 years of the Oklahoma Ugly Bug contest" and large photos will be on display. The other exhibits will also be open to meeting attendees. Click on the following link to see the OMS MEETING FLYER for details. The dinner will be catered by Benvenuti's and will feature vegen, gluten-free and other dietary options. Click on the following link to see the DINNER MENU for details. (Members are free, guests $20).

The keynote speech will be "3-D and In-situ Characterization of Nanomaterials in the Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope" by Dr. Ilke Arslan. With recent advances in in-situ microscopy, a new era in microscopy has arrived that allows for the dynamic imaging of materials under reaction conditions. It is no longer sufficient to image materials in vacuum conditions, but to get closer to the conditions in which the material will be used, such as high temperature, liquid environments, gas environments or a combination thereof. Combining an in-situ or ex-situ experiment with STEM tomography is a very powerful method for materials characterization. The benefits and limitations of all these methods will be discussed through examples of different inorganic materials.

All nanomaterials are three-dimensional (3-D) in nature whether they are used for catalysis, energy storage, semiconductors, or medicine. While (scanning) transmission electron microscopes ((S)TEMs) are typically used to analyze these materials, the images are 2-D projections of 3-D objects. In order to understand the true nature of the nanomaterial, a 3-D tomogram is necessary on the nano- or atomic scale. Traditionally, this involves taking a series of images of the sample at different tilt angles, normally ranging between -70 to +70 every 1 to 2 degrees, and using these two dimensional images to reconstruct a three dimensional volume of the sample. This tilt range may increase depending on the sample geometry and the holder used, but there is a constant battle against an artifact in the reconstruction called the missing wedge. This effect may be reduced greatly by performing dual axis tomography, or overcome completely using new holder technologies, but each technique has its pros and cons. Another approach that has been taken in the last 3-5 years is the development of novel algorithms that greatly reduce the effects of the missing wedge and even provide atomic resolution 3-D tomograms from just a few projection images.

Ilke Arslan received her Ph.D. in Physics from the University of California at Davis, and is currently a Senior Scientist at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington. Before joining PNNL, Ilke was on the faculty of the Chemical Engineering and Materials Science Department at the University of California, Davis, and still holds an Adjunct Professor position there. She has held fellowships from the National Science Foundation, the Royal Society, and the Truman Fellowship at Sandia National Labs, and has been honored by President Obama with the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers. Her interests include materials for quantum computing, catalysis, and technique development in tomography, in-situ liquid and gas microscopy, and EELS.

Fall meeting 2017

The 2017 Fall Technical Meeting will be held in conjunction with the 106th Annual Technical Meeting of the Oklahoma Academy of Science on Friday November 3, 2017 at Rogers State University in Claremore, about 30 min NW of Tulsa (GPS coordinates: 1701 W. Will Rogers Blvd). Our keynote speaker is still to be determined.

OMS will also host a number of contributed talks, competition for the 2017 Timpano Award for the best student presentation and voting for the 2017 Ugly Bug Contest. Rules for the Timpano Award are available at the Timpano Award Rules site.

If you would like to present a paper or poster, Dr. Matt Lundwall would be happy to hear from you. His email is Matt.Lundwall@P66.com. We may also vote on the winners of the 21st Oklahoma Ugly Bug Contest, which provides fun activities and a microscope for winning primary (1-5th grade) schools and intermediate students (6th grade). For more information, see the Oklahoma Ugly Bug site.

Information about the Fall Technical meeting is also available from OAS at the following URL: http://www.oklahomaacademyofscience.org/technical-meeting1.html. Registration is available through links at this site. For your convenience, Rogers State University has provided a detailed campus map of the buildings.

Past 2016 Fall meeting:

The 2016 Fall Technical Meeting was held in conjunction with the 105th Annual Technical Meeting of the Oklahoma Academy of Science on Friday November 4, 2016 at the OSU Center for Health Sciences in Tulsa at 1111 W. 17th St. Our keynote speaker was Dr. Daniela Nicastro, who is in the process of moving her lab from Brandeis University to UT Southwestern. Dr. Nicastro is a leading expert in cellular cryo-electron tomography, studying the three-dimensional structure and function of cytoskeletal assemblies, molecular motors, organelles and cells using a combination of cutting-edge methods to elucidate the structure-function relationships of macromolecular complexes in their native organization.

OMS also hosted a number of contributed talks, competition for the 2016 Timpano Award for the best student presentation and voting for the 2016 Ugly Bug Contest. The winners of the Timpano Award were First Prize: Kayla Miller for "Choride and Sulfate Exchange in Short-Term, Low Temperature Brine + Jarosite Experiments" by Kayla M. Miller (OU), Andrew S. Elwood Madden (OU), Charity M. Phillips-Lander (OU), Janice L. Bishop (SETI/NASA Ames), and Megan E. Elwood Madden (OU)" and Second Prize: Michael Anderson for "Tissue Clearing with PACT, Fluorescent Immunohistochemistry and 3-Dimensional Reconstruction for the Spatial Evaluation of Protein Interactions" by Michael B. Anderson and Kenneth E. Miller. Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences. Rules for the Timpano Award are available at the Timpano Award Rules site.

We also voted on the winners of the 20th Oklahoma Ugly Bug Contest, which provides fun activities and a microscope for winning primary (1-5th grade) schools and intermediate students (6th grade). We have not named the winners yet as voting is still continuing. For more information, see the Oklahoma Ugly Bug site.

Information about the Fall Technical meeting is also available from OAS at the following URL: http://www.oklahomaacademyofscience.org/technical-meeting1.html. Registration is available through links at this site. For your convenience, OSU-CHS provided a detailed campus map of the buildings.

A listserv list is now available for all of the members at: OMS-L@lists.ou.edu, to the OMS Executive Board at: OMS-EXEC@lists.ou.edu, and to all of the OMS Corporate members at: OMS-CORP@lists.ou.edu.

For more information:

Information about EM and societies:

This page is maintained by Scott Russell, Samuel Roberts Noble Microscopy Lab, University of Oklahoma. Please address any comments or inquiries to srussell@ou.edu. Of course, like most web pages out there, these are still under development, so any suggestions for improvements, useful links or information about defective links would be appreciated. This page was last revised Saturday, 29-Apr-2017 16:14:25 CDT.

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