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  The graduate program in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology spans >40 faculty across campus guiding students from the  Departments of Plant Biology-Microbiology and Biology at the University of Oklahoma.
 
 


"EEBies" study a wide variety of taxa, from the archaea to fungi, from algae to insects, from grasses to mammals.  We ask questions at a variety of levels from physiological ecology to phylogenetic reconstruction. We use tools as varied as quadrats and computer models, molecules and satellites, to get at the answers.  We work in ecosystems throughout Oklahoma, from high prairie to the ozark forests, from rivers to reservoirs, and from the polar seas to tropical rainforests.

 Our program offers guidance, tools, facilities, and financial support to students of ecology and evolutionary biology. 

 
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Ecomunch
1:30 in Richards 304
Will resume again Fall Semester.


Recent News
Congrats to Yiqi Luo on his election to AAAS.

Congratulations to Carla Atkinson, who's Dissertation Hierarchical Controls on the Impact of Consumer Stoichiometric Regulation earned a best in the Science and Engineering here at OU.

Check out Elizabeth Pennisi's writeup in Science on the Kaspari lab's ongoing work on sodium limitation.

 

 

New NSF - IOS - OEI grant to Larry Weider on Resurrection Ecology
Weider and colleagues (including EEB alum Puni Jeyasingh) will combine resurrection ecology of long-dormant (i.e. decades, centuries-old) resting eggs of the important aquatic herbivore zooplankter, Daphnia pulicaria, with Next-Generation-Genomic Sequencing methods, quantitative genetics, experimental physiological ecology, and paleolimnological techniques to examine the underlying role of environmental change (i.e. nutrient enrichment) in impacting the evolutionary dynamics of physiological and genomic shifts in this herbivore. Resurrected genotypes separated by thousands of generations of evolution in the wild will be examined. This is an ideal model system to better understand the evolutionary consequences of rapid global environmental change..

EEB Spotlight

Larry Weider